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Search results “Uses of natural fuel resources”
Natural Fuel Resources
 
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Make an animated explainer video for free at: http://www.rawshorts.com Now you create your own explainer videos and animated presentations for free. Raw Shorts is a free cloud based video builder that allows you to make awesome explanation videos for your business, website, startup video, pitch video, product launch, video resume, landing page video or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. Our free video templates and explainer video software will help you create presentation videos in an instant! It's never been easier to make an animated explainer video with outstanding production value and without the cost or hassle of hiring an expensive production company or animation studio. Wait no more! Our animation software is free to use. You can make an animated video today for your landing page, website, kickstarter video, indiegogo video, pitch video and more. Simply log on and select from thousands of animated icons, animated characters and free video templates for business to make the perfect web video for your business.
Views: 194 Almas Sofiya
Fossil Fuels 101
 
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Fossil fuel is a term used to describe a group of energy sources that were formed when ancient plants and organisms were subject to intense heat and pressure over millions of years. Learn more about the fossil fuels and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 529431 Student Energy
Science Channel - Importance and Uses of Natural Resources
 
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Find more than 1500 education videos available at http://www.youtube.com/user/IkenEdu Natural resources are important for our daily lives such as SUN, Coal, Petroleum, Minerals etc. Sun gives us light, Vitamin D. We use Coal as fuel, Petroleum provides us petrol, diesel etc. which are used as fuel in Vehicles. So there are so many uses of these Natural Resources and they are very important.
Views: 76284 Iken Edu
The journey of natural gas
 
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Natural gas is fundamental to our way of life - we use it for cooking, heating, electricity and power. Over 90% of the natural gas used in Queensland comes from coal seams, but how is it formed and how is it produced? Take a look at how we go about developing our coal seam gas resources safely and sustainably, as we build a new industry that will power the Queensland economy for many years to come.
Views: 746904 Santos GLNG
How to draw Save Fuel for better environment drawing and painting
 
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Hi friends, hope you are doing great........😊😊 In this video, I have shown you, Drawing on save fuel for better environment in an easy way especially for kids. This is a save fuel for better environment painting and poster step by step Things used 1. Camlin Kokuyo Oil Pastel (50 Shades) https://amzn.to/2k1NO2p used in the video are 25 shades. 2.White paint marker pen https://amzn.to/2KlDXPV 3. paper napkins for blending 4. STAEDTLER 8b pencil https://amzn.to/2Kru97c Or pencil https://amzn.to/2IHn01Y 5. Use Art paper. Normal drawing paper 6. Masking tape https://amzn.to/2IpIno8 7. White paint marker pen https://amzn.to/2KlDXPV Subscribe to my channel to get more drawing videos. ▽ Visit my channel 👇: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwPA7tDDZqdkWNtVX3iqMxA ▽ My Facebook Page Link 👇 ➞ https://www.facebook.com/ArtandSketch123/ ▽ My Twitter Link 👇 ➞ https://twitter.com/artandsketch123?lang=en ▽ My Instagram Link 👇 ➞ https://www.instagram.com/artandsketch123/?hl=en Music Credit: Adventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music released by Argofox https://youtu.be/8BXNwnxaVQE Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/MkNeIUgNPQ8 #drawing #ArtandSketch #painting
Views: 274987 Art and Sketch
Why Natural Gas Could Be the Fuel That Changes the World
 
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July 29 -- The first liquefied natural gas tanker ship passed through the expanded Panama Canal on July 25, hauling gas from the U.S. Gulf Coast. The shortcut means less time and money spent getting American gas across the Pacific. Natural gas already has a lot going for it -- it's cheap, burns cleaner than other fossil fuels and it's plentiful. The new route just adds to why LNG may be the fuel of the future. Like this video? Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg?sub_confirmation=1 And subscribe to Bloomberg Politics for the latest political news: http://www.youtube.com/BloombergPolitics?sub_confirmation=1 Bloomberg is the First Word in business news, delivering breaking news & analysis, up-to-the-minute market data, features, profiles and more: http://www.bloomberg.com Connect with us on... Twitter: https://twitter.com/business Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bloombergbusiness Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bloombergbusiness/ Bloomberg Television brings you coverage of the biggest business stories and exclusive interviews with newsmakers, 24 hours a day: http://www.bloomberg.com/live Connect with us on... Twitter: https://twitter.com/bloombergtv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BloombergTelevision Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bloombergtv
Views: 54658 Bloomberg
Will Fossil Fuels Run Out? | Earth Lab
 
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Greg Foot looks into the dirty world of fossil fuels. Will we run out of fossil fuels and what cost will we likely pay for their use? Footnotes 1 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html and https://www.theguardian.com/science/2009/feb/07/first-dinosaurs-late-triassic 2 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html 3- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 4- https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/pdf/energy-economics/statistical-review-2015/bp-statistical-review-of-world-energy-2015-full-report.pdf 5- http://fortune.com/2016/07/05/oil-reserves-us/ 6- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 7- http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidblackmon/2013/07/16/as-fracking-rises-peak-oil-theory-slowly-dies/#7bc2bf0c589b 8- https://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/article/shale_in_the_united_states.cfm 9- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2013/jul/23/peak-oil-bbc-shale-fracking-economy-recession 10- http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013EO280001/abstract 11- http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/08/17/490375230/oil-3-how-fracking-changed-the-world 12- https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-13/saudi-arabia-overtakes-u-s-as-largest-oil-producer-iea-says 13 - http://climate.nasa.gov/ and http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/05/26/climate_change_denying_reality_is_a_threat_to_our_nation.html 14 https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases 15 http://www.carbontracker.org/resources/ and https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 16 - https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-age-of-wind-and-solar-is-closer-than-you-think/ Subscribe for more awesome science - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV
Views: 359520 BBC Earth Lab
Natural Gas 101
 
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Natural Gas is a flammable gas, consisting mainly of methane (CH4), occurring in underground reservoirs often with oil. Learn more about natural gas and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 220071 Student Energy
Oil and Gas Formation
 
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A fast paced explanation of how many oil and gas deposits form and how we explore for them.
Natural Fuel Resources
 
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Make an animated explainer video for free at: http://www.rawshorts.com Now you create your own explainer videos and animated presentations for free. Raw Shorts is a free cloud based video builder that allows you to make awesome explanation videos for your business, website, startup video, pitch video, product launch, video resume, landing page video or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. Our free video templates and explainer video software will help you create presentation videos in an instant! It's never been easier to make an animated explainer video with outstanding production value and without the cost or hassle of hiring an expensive production company or animation studio. Wait no more! Our animation software is free to use. You can make an animated video today for your landing page, website, kickstarter video, indiegogo video, pitch video and more. Simply log on and select from thousands of animated icons, animated characters and free video templates for business to make the perfect web video for your business.
Views: 30 Almas Sofiya
26. Natural Fuel Resources
 
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Natural Fuel
Views: 49 SHK SMKBJa
Analysing Natural Fuel Resources and their Importance
 
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Natural Fuel Resources
Views: 122 SHK SMKBJ
Fossil Fuels
 
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024 - Fossil Fuels In this video Paul Andersen explains how fossil fuels are formed when organic material is heating and squeezed in an anaerobic environment. Formation, extraction, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed for coal, petroleum and natural gas. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: BLM, T. P. F. office of the. (2007). English: A natural gas drilling rig on the Pinedale Anticline, just west of Wyoming’s Wind River Range. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rig_wind_river.jpg Bobjgalindo. (2004). English: Gas prices, may 2004, Sinclair gas station, Oregon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GasPriceOR.jpg Coal formation. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2015, from https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13598459184/ Company, N. I. O. (1970). Bidboland gas refinery Aghajary Iran. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bidboland_gas_refinery.jpg Delphi234. (2014). English: Total world energy consumption by source 2013, from REN21 Renewables 2014 Global Status Report. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Total_World_Energy_Consumption_by_Source_2013.png Diatom. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/174569/diatom English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg John, J. S. (2013). English: Tar sandstone from the Monterey Formation of Miocene age. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tar_Sandstone_California.jpg Knight, A. E. (2015). English: A sign for a Sinclair gas station. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinclair_gas_station_sign.JPG Observatory, N. E. (2009). English: Athabasca Oil Sands NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Athabasca_oil_sands.jpg Plazak. (2015). English: Hubbert’s upper-bound prediction for US crude oil production (1956), and actual lower-48 states production through 2014. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_Upper-Bound_Peak_1956.png Unknown. (2004). English: Coal mine in Wyoming. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_mine_Wyoming.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg User. (2011). English: Chu Huo in Kenting, Taiwan. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chuhuo.jpg Wikipedia, F. at E. (2007). English: A pumpjack in Texas. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oil_well.jpg Wikipedia, S. at E. (2007). English: Castle Gate Power Plant near Helper by David Jolley 2007. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Castle_Gate_Power_Plant,_Utah_2007.jpg Wikipedia, T. original uploader was D. at E. (2004). Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ashtabulacoalcars_e2.jpg Wikipedia, W. at E. (2007). Outcrop of Ordovician oil shale (kukersite), northern Estonia. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OilShaleEstonia.jpg Zooplankton silhouette. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/170815/zooplankton-silhouette
Views: 75583 Bozeman Science
Renewable Resources Game Show – BRAIN ZAPPED | Science for Kids! | batteryPOP
 
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Educate, inspire and entertain with these short, relatable, fast-paced videos packed full of TEKS-based information. Best of all, real students like YOU present the information! In this episode, it's time for everyone's favorite game: Renewable or Non-Renewable Resource! batteryPOP is the digital kids network! We feature hours of fun, kid-safe videos from cartoons to comedy to music and more! Check our channel every week for new shows and shorts as well as classic kids stuff you know and love! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE to our channel! https://www.youtube.com/user/batteryP... Keep up with BRAIN ZAPPED on our website: http://www.batteryPOP.com/shows/brain-zapped Tweet us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/batterypop Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/batterypop/ ‘Like’ us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Batterypop/
What is LNG? Turning natural gas into liquid | Natural Gas
 
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As global demand for natural gas grows, companies are using advanced technology to transport it from source to customers. Gas can be piped over relatively short distances. But cooling the gas to -162°C (-260°F) turns it to liquid for easier, safe shipment to faraway markets overseas. Shell provided the natural gas for the first liquefied natural gas (LNG) project more than 50 years ago. Today the world's largest provider of LNG, Shell continues to develop innovative approaches to unlock new resources of natural gas. In North-West Australia, for example, Shell is working with partners to build a giant floating production and liquefaction facility at sea, Prelude FLNG. Welcome to Shell’s official YouTube channel. Subscribe here to learn about the future of energy, see our new technology and innovation in action or watch highlights from our major projects around the world. Here you’ll also find videos on jobs and careers, motorsports, the Shell Eco-marathon as well as new products like Shell V-Power. If you have any thoughts or questions, please comment, like or share. Together we can #makethefuture Visit our Website: http://www.shell.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Shell/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shell/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/shell Look us up on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/royaldutchshell Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1271/
Views: 409520 Shell
Different Sources of Energy, Using Energy Responsibly, Educational Video for Kids
 
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Learning about the different sources of energy. The difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Learn ways to conserve energy right at home, and make a difference! Recommended for grades: 4 - 6. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
How Algae Could Change The Fossil Fuel Industry
 
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Watch the next video to learn more about the science of algae fuel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExOXF1x3N1g Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1 Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com App - iOS http://seekernetwork.com/ios App - Android http://seekernetwork.com/android Great strides have been made in recent years towards using renewable sources of energy, like electric vehicles, solar panels, wind energy and even algae. It might seem surprising, but algae is one of the most powerful sources of energy we have access to on Earth. When dried algae is ground into a powder and refined, oil can be extracted from it. The result is nearly identical to traditional gasoline, but with far more benefits. Dave Hazlebeck, CEO of Global Algae Innovations, gave Seeker a tour of his algae farm in Kauai, Hawaii, and explained how his company is revolutionizing sustainable energy. "The fuel that we're producing is exactly the same in terms of performance as gasoline or diesel or jet, it's just a lot cleaner. I think the big difference is that [with] all the other biofuels, you're growing it and you're just getting biofuel. In this case, for every gallon of biofuel you get 10 pounds of food with it," Hazlebeck said. Hazlebeck believes his company is on the path to completely change the way we currently produce both oil and food. Not only can algae create biofuel, it can also be used to create animal feed. Currently, most animal and fish feed is made from corn or soy, which both use more water and energy to grow than algae. "There's studies that show with algae grown to replace animal feed, you could actually solve global warming to a large extent," Hazlebeck told Seeker. Algae can be used to create food for humans as well. New Wave Foods in Northern California created fake shrimp made from algae and other plants that actually looks, smells and even tastes like real shrimp. Because it's made from algae, the shrimp substitute also has the added benefit of being low in fat and extremely rich in nutrients, something that corn and soy are severely lacking. Growing algae for oil and food could also significantly reduce deforestation. According to Scientific American, the yields from algae are far more significant than crops like corn or soy. If all the fuel in the country was replaced with biofuel from corn, we would need a facility three times the size of the continental U.S. to produce it. But for algae, we would need a facility the size of Maryland. Additionally, algae can produce 40 times more food per acre than traditional crops. While showing the Seeker team around GAI's Hawaii facility, Hazlebeck explained that the algae farm is next to a power plant, which puts it in a very unique position. "[It] allows us to capture carbon dioxide and avoid that discharge and reuse it, and that prevents it from going into the atmosphere and causing global warming," he said. "If every power plant had an algae farm next to it, it could potentially solve the global warming issue entirely." The environmental benefits of algae are impressive, and because algae can grow in both freshwater and seawater, it's also very easy to produce. So, does that mean we'll all be filling our cars with algae gas at the pumps very soon? Not just yet. Hazlebeck and his team have run into a few setbacks since they began scaling up their operations. The most prohibitive issue has been the cost. When Global Algae Innovations began, a gallon of oil produced from algae was about $30 a gallon -- 10 times higher than it needs to be to work as a viable alternative to fossil fuel. But Hazlebeck and his team didn't give up, and they've continued to come up with solutions to decrease the cost. As of now, they almost have algae oil down to only $2 - $3 a gallon. Once GAI can get their algae production up to scale, Hazlebeck believes it will change the geopolitics of the world. "A lot of the reasons we have wars are because of fights over resources or the need for more resources. By creating a more equitable distribution with countries being able to make their own, it should lead to a more stable and peaceful world," he told Seeker. That's really the point of it all for Hazlebeck and GAI. They don't want to be the only company doing this; they want everyone working together because they truly believe using algae as a fuel and food source will change the world. Executive Producer: Laura Ling Producers: Paige Keipper (Hansen), Conor Spicer Cinematographers: Matthew Piniol Spencer Snider Editor: Lee Mould
Views: 175030 Stories
Could We Make The Perfect Energy Source?
 
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Solar? Wind? Coal? Oil? Natural Gas? While we use all of these, could we make the most efficient energy source yet? Watch more: Could We Build A Planet From Scratch? ►► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fUO3Xjlohc&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6JtEDRfRMyb6rFd1acqYSlO&index=49&t=0s Subscribe: https://bit.ly/SubLifeNoggin | Get your exclusive Life Noggin merch: http://keeponthinking.co Support Life Noggin on Patreon: https://patreon.com/LifeNogginStudios Follow Life Noggin! Facebook: https://facebook.com/LifeNoggin/?ref=br_rs Instagram: https://instagram.com/lifenoggin/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lifenoggin Official Website: https://lnstudios.co/ Watch More Life Noggin: Latest Uploads: https://youtube.com/watch?v=4A6XkYpmidU&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6JtEDRfRMyb6rFd1acqYSlO Big Questions: https://youtube.com/watch?v=rJTkHGXMdb0&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6LtaKh-Eqj7Cs4Tmf5iQPx4 Outer Space: https://youtube.com/watch?v=rJTkHGXMdb0&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6IPWXQvW3Exk9bqGzOdj8Qq Inside the Human Body: https://youtube.com/watch?v=FVnnM6hZ7Wk&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6JoZQ-Sy3eK2rjiDsamxCQs Popular Videos: https://youtube.com/watch?v=1bVfzBD-40E&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6IYeU-cNGR6NYHW19GMiPNy We are LIFE NOGGIN! An animated and educational web show designed to teach you all about your awesome life and the brain that makes you able to live it! We answer questions about everything from inside the human body to deep outer space. Stay tuned for more videos on every Monday and Thursday! Keep On Thinking. Life Noggin Team: Director/Voice: http://lifenogg.in/PatGraziosi Executive Producer - Ian Dokie: http://instagram.com/iandokie Director of Marketing: http://lifenogg.in/JaredOban Animation by Robert Grisham Written by Sophie Bakoledis: https://www.instagram.com/sophieexplorestheworld/ Sources: https://www.eia.gov/outlooks/ieo/pdf/0484(2017).pdf https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=nuclear_home https://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/fact-sheets/byproduct-materials.html https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=wind_environment https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-energy/renewable-energy/environmental-impacts#.WmpaulPwbfZ https://water.usgs.gov/edu/wuhy.html https://qz.com/1125355/solar-and-wind-are-now-the-cheapest-energy-around-unless-you-need-to-store-it/ https://www.lazard.com/perspective/levelized-cost-of-energy-2017/ https://qz.com/1077688/solar-costs-in-the-us-beat-government-goals-by-three-years/ https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/09/solar-now-costs-6-per-kilowatt-hour-beating-government-goal-by-3-years/ https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=107&t=3 https://www.eia.gov/electricity/annual/html/epa_08_01.html https://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2016/10/f33/Source%20Energy%20Report%20-%20Final%20-%2010.21.16.pdf https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=107&t=3 https://www.osha.gov/dep/greenjobs/index.html https://www.osha.gov/dep/greenjobs/biofuels.html https://www.osha.gov/dep/greenjobs/geo_silica.html https://www.osha.gov/dep/greenjobs/windenergy.html https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149197016300774 http://time.com/4756648/batteries-clean-energy-renewables/ https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276164566_Potential_of_lithium-ion_batteries_in_renewable_energy
Views: 563381 Life Noggin
What is energy for kids | Learn about Energy Sources | Renewable Energy |  الطاقة | エネルギー | zaffron
 
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This video represents a good explanation of What is energy for kids. You will gonna learn about Energy Sources for kids, How we use Energy ( how to save energy ) and a brief understanding about different types of Renewable Energy resources as well as the nonrenewable ones. ► What is energy ? The best definition of energy, that every children should know, is that the Scientists define energy as the ability to do work. Modern civilization is possible because people have learned how to change energy from one form to another and then use it to do work. We use energy to move cars along roads and boats through water, to cook food on stoves, to make ice in freezers, and to light our homes. Energy comes in different forms: Heat (thermal), Light (radiant), Motion (kinetic), Electrical, Chemical, Nuclear energy and Gravitational Energy. People use energy for everything from making a jump shot to sending astronauts into space. There are two types of energy: ( Stored (potential) energy + Working (kinetic) energy ). For example, the food a person eats contains chemical energy, and a person's body stores this energy until he or she uses it as kinetic energy during work or play. Energy sources can be categorized as renewable or nonrenewable When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated by burning coal, by a nuclear reaction, or by a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name just a few sources. Therefore, coal, nuclear, and hydro are called energy sources. When people fill up a gas tank, the source might be petroleum refined from crude oil or ethanol made by growing and processing corn. Energy sources are divided into two groups: 1- Renewable (an energy source that can be easily replenished) 2- Nonrenewable (an energy source that cannot be easily replenished). ► Renewable energy and nonrenewable energy for kids : Renewable and nonrenewable energy sources can be used as primary energy sources to produce useful energy such as heat or used to produce secondary energy sources such as electricity. When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated from burning coal or natural gas, a nuclear reaction, or a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name a few possible energy sources. The gasoline people use to fuel their cars is made from crude oil (nonrenewable energy) and may contain a bio-fuel (renewable energy) like ethanol, which is made from processed corn. ► Moreover, you will gonna learn What is renewable energy for kids ? There are five main renewable energy sources: 1- Solar energy from the sun 2- Geothermal energy from heat inside the earth 3- Wind energy 4- Biomass from plants 5- Hydro power from flowing water ► What is Nonrenewable energy ? Most of the energy consumed in the United States is from nonrenewable energy sources: ( Petroleum products - Hydrocarbon gas liquids - Natural gas - Coal - Nuclear energy ). Crude oil, natural gas, and coal are called fossil fuels because they were formed over millions of years by the action of heat from the earth's core and pressure from rock and soil on the remains (or fossils) of dead plants and creatures like microscopic diatoms. Most of the petroleum products consumed in the United States are made from crude oil, but petroleum liquids can also be made from natural gas and coal. Nuclear energy is produced from uranium, a nonrenewable energy source whose atoms are split (through a process called nuclear fission) to create heat and, eventually, electricity. By watching this video, you will gonna learn how to conserve energy resources ( energy saving ) by understanding how energy conservation mechanism work as well as much knowledge about alternative energy resources. Enjoy watching and have a great time learning about energy sources for children.
Views: 44763 Zaffron
Thanks, Fossil Fuels
 
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Happy Thanksgiving! While you’re taking time to be thankful for your friends, family, food, drinks, and other luxuries, perhaps you should take a moment to say thank you to the resources that make this holiday so wonderful: fossil fuels. Watch to learn just how much oil, natural gas, and coal bring to the table during the holiday season (and every other day of the year) VISIT Clear Energy Alliance https://clearenergyalliance.com/ FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClearEnergyAlliance Twitter: https://twitter.com/clearenergy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/clearenergyalliance For list of sources and downloadable transcript: https://clearenergyalliance.com/project/thanks-fossil-fuels/ Script: Here’s an unexpected twist on Thanksgiving. While we’re expressing our gratitude for family, friends, food, jobs and other good stuff, let’s include something extremely important that we mostly take for granted. This Thanksgiving let’s acknowledge oil, natural gas, and coal, for without them life would be much shorter, way harder and a lot less fun. Let’s get real here. By historical standards, most of us are living in amazing, exciting future-land. We could spend hours, days really, talking about all the ways that fossil fuels make our lives healthy, productive, comfortable, safe and generally pretty great. But, for the sake of brevity, let’s just take a quick look at look at how we enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday. For starters, very few of us actually have to work on Thanksgiving or the day after, or Saturday and Sunday. It’s a four-day holiday! For about 99.9 percent of human existence, four days of doing nothing but eating, shopping and goofing off would have been unthinkable. The only reason we can take such a long break is that we invented all kinds of machines to do our work for us and all of those machines were manufactured and are powered by fossil fuels. Just imagine all the cars, trucks, trains, planes and ships that were used to bring all that good food to your home, as well as all those important people in your life. Most of the meat, vegetables, breads, beverages, and sweet confections came from hundreds or even thousands of miles away. And don’t forget about the big machines that produced all that food in the first place. Fossil fuels aided by some strong hands did that work. And, by the way, natural gas and oil were used as feedstocks for all the plastics, rubber, lubricants and a multitude of petrochemicals used to package your Thanksgiving feast. Don’t forget about the natural gas range and the electric oven that are used to cook the food and keep it warm. Fossil fuel electricity also powers the lights, the air conditioning, furnace, the TV, phones, and tablets. The water heater is there for everything from meal prep through the clean-up, as is the refrigerator and the dishwasher is pretty handy, too. Ok. I know. You get it. I don’t need to mention that oil, natural gas, and coal were used to bring you the seemingly countless football, basketball and hockey games.... or that lots of fossil fuel will be used when buying up everything under the sun on Black Friday. Although… I guess I just did. Yes... let’s recognize it’s not just fossil fuels that are deserving of our gratitude. Nuclear, hydropower and other renewables deserve some credit as well. But, since fossil fuels pull 80 percent of our energy load, which includes manufacturing all other energy technologies, that’s why fossil fuels should get the bulk of our praise. Of course, be thankful for your family and friends, your faith, your country, your job, and even your favorite beer. But while you’re feeling grateful, give thanks to those hard-working people that produced the fossil fuels that work so hard for you on Thanksgiving and every other day of the year. Happy Thanksgiving. For the Clear Energy Alliance, I’m Mark Mathis. Power On.
Views: 38156 Clear Energy Alliance
Resources: Welcome to the Neighborhood - Crash Course Kids #2.1
 
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Welcome to the Neighborhood! Humans need a lot of things to survive (I'm sure you've noticed). We need food, water, and shelter and it takes a lot of resources to get all of those things. What are resources? In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina talks about what resources are and how we use them. And you might be surprised where all of it starts. This first series is based on 5th grade science. We're super excited and hope you enjoy Crash Course Kids! ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/CrashCourseKids Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Producer: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Ben Kessler Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 213952 Crash Course Kids
Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuels
 
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As America takes steps to improve our energy security, home-grown fuel sources are more important that ever. One of the fuel sources of the future is algae, small aquatic organisms that convert sunlight into energy and store it in the form of oil. Scientists and engineers at the Energy Department and its national laboratories are researching the best strains of algae and developing the most efficient farming practices. This edition of Energy 101 shows how oil is extracted from algae and refined into sustainable biofuels. For more information on biofuels visit http://www.eere.energy.gov.
Fossil Fuel || जीवाश्म ईंधन || Class - X || Science [ In Hindi & English]
 
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We have seen some of the issues involved in the conservation and sustainable use of resources like forests, wild-life and water. These can meet our needs perpetually if we were to use them in a sustainable manner. Now we come to yet another important resource – fossil fuels, that is, coal and petroleum, which are important sources of energy for us. Since the industrial revolution, we have been using increasing amounts of energy to meet our basic needs and for the manufacture of a large number of goods upon which our lives depend. These energy needs have been largely met by the reserves of coal and petroleum. The management of these energy sources involves slightly different perspectives from those resources discussed earlier. Coal and petroleum were formed from the degradation of bio-mass millions of years ago and hence these are resources that will be exhausted in the future no matter how carefully we use them. And then we would need to look for alternative sources of energy. Various estimates as to how long these resources will last us exist and one is that at present rates of usage, our known petroleum resources will last us for about forty years and the coal resources will last for another two hundred years.
Science Video for Kids: Natural Resources of the Earth
 
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Natural resources are found all over Earth like sunlight, air, water, rocks, soil, plants and animals. There are two types of natural resources - renewable and nonrenewable resources. Let's learn more about natural resources by playing this video. #ChildEducation #ScienceVideos #Kids #Science #Education Looking for more educational content? After watching the video, put your kids' knowledge to the test with our Natural Resources quiz: http://ow.ly/10hqkD
Views: 442915 Turtlediary
Top 10 Energy Sources of the Future
 
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These are ten most promising alternative energy sources of tomorrow. It’s a really exciting time to be alive. We have a front row seat to the only known transformation of a world powered by dirty fossil fuels, to a planet that gets its energy from renewable, clean sources. It’s happening just once, right now. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Join us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/100134925804523235350/posts Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo 10. Space-based solar power http://energy.gov/articles/space-based-solar-power 9. Human Power http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-harness-human-power-electricity/ 8. Tidal Power http://www.renewablegreenenergypower.com/wave-energy-facts/ 7. Hydrogen (fuel cells) http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/story/chapter20.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen-powered_aircraft 6. Geothermal heat from underground lava beds http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_energy#Electricity https://theconversation.com/drilling-surprise-opens-door-to-volcano-powered-electricity-22515 5. Nuclear Waste http://nautil.us/issue/7/waste/our-nuclear-waste-is-a-goldmine http://gehitachiprism.com/ 4. Solar windows http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growth_of_photovoltaics http://renewableresourcesinc.com/10-interesting-facts-about-solar-energy/#.VAtud2RdVB8 3. Bio-fuels (algae) http://cleantechnica.com/2014/08/20/alabama-gets-first-world-carbon-negative-algae-biofuel/ http://biofuel.org.uk/biofuel-facts.html 2. Flying wind farms http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/high-flying-turbine-produces-more-power-0515 http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=427&t=3 1. Nuclear fusion http://www.americansecurityproject.org/10-key-facts-about-nuclear-fusion/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER#Timeline_and_current_status http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/nuclear-fusion-from-google-lockheed-draper-fisher/
Views: 1591447 The Daily Conversation
If We Stop Burning Fossil Fuel, [once try this] GyanTech
 
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A fossil fuel is a fuel formed by natural processes, such as anaerobic decompositionof buried dead organisms, containing energy originating in ancient photosynthesis.[1]The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years.[2] Fossil fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[3] Other commonly used derivatives include kerosene and propane. Fossil fuels range from volatile materials with low carbon to hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquids like petroleum, to nonvolatile materials composed of almost pure carbon, like anthracite coal. Methane can be found in hydrocarbon fields either alone, associated with oil, or in the form of methane clathrates. The theory that fossil fuels formed from the fossilized remains of dead plants by exposure to heat and pressure in the Earth's crust over millions of years was first introduced by Georgius Agricola in 1546 and later by Mikhail Lomonosov in the 18th century.[4] The United States Energy Information Administration estimates that in 2007 the world's primary energy sources consisted of petroleum (36.0%), coal (27.4%), natural gas (23.0%), amounting to an 86.4% share for fossil fuels in primary energy consumption in the world.[5] Non-fossil sources in 2006 included nuclear (8.5%), hydroelectric (6.3%), and others (geothermal, solar, tidal, wind, wood, waste) amounting to 0.9%.[6] World energy consumption was growing at about 2.3% per year. Although fossil fuels are continually being formed via natural processes, they are generally considered to be non-renewable resources because they take millions of years to form and the known viable reserves are being depleted much faster than new ones are being made.[7][8] The use of fossil fuels raises serious environmental concerns. The burning of fossil fuels produces around 21.3 billion tonnes(21.3 gigatonnes) of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. It is estimated that natural processes can only absorb about half of that amount, so there is a net increase of 10.65 billion tonnes of atmospheric carbon dioxide per year.[9] Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that increases radiative forcing and contributes to global warming. A global movement towards the generation of low-carbon renewable energy is underway to help reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels are of great importance because they can be burned (oxidized to carbon dioxideand water), producing significant amounts of energy per unit mass. The use of coal as a fuel predates recorded history. Coal was used to run furnaces for the melting of metal ore. Semi-solid hydrocarbons from seeps were also burned in ancient times,[11] but these materials were mostly used for waterproofing and embalming.[12] Commercial exploitation of petroleum began in the 19th century, largely to replace oils from animal sources (notably whale oil) for use in oil lamps.[13] Natural gas, once flared-off as an unneeded byproduct of petroleum production, is now considered a very valuable resource.[14] Natural gas deposits are also the main source of the element helium. Heavy crude oil, which is much more viscous than conventional crude oil, and tar sands, where bitumen is found mixed with sand and clay, began to become more important as sources of fossil fuel as of the early 2000s.[15] Oil shale and similar materials are sedimentary rocks containing kerogen, a complex mixture of high-molecular weight organic compounds, which yield synthetic crude oil when heated (pyrolyzed). These materials had yet to be fully exploited commercially.[16] With additional processing, they can be employed in lieu of other already established fossil fuel deposits. More recently, there has been disinvestment from exploitation of such resources due to their high carbon cost, relative to more easily processed reserves.[17] Prior to the latter half of the 18th century, windmills and watermills provided the energy needed for industry such as milling flour, sawing wood or pumping water, and burning wood or peat provided domestic heat. The widescale use of fossil fuels, coal at first and petroleum later, to fire steam engines enabled the Industrial Revolution. At the same time, gas lights using natural gas or coal gas were coming into wide use. The invention of the internal combustion engine and its use in automobilesand trucks greatly increased the demand for gasoline and diesel oil, both made from fossil fuels. Other forms of transportation, railways and aircraft, also required fossil fuels. The other major use for fossil fuels is in generating electricity and as feedstockfor the petrochemical industry. Tar, a leftover of petroleum extraction, is used in construction of roads.
Views: 40 GyanTech
Series - Part 1: Oil and gas - Million year-old treasures beneath the earth
 
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How are oil and gas formed? What tools do geologists use to search for these valuable resources? And what techniques exist for extracting oil and gas from the ground where they have lain for thousands of years? Our first short film in the series on crude oil and natural gas, which was made in cooperation with the production company Real & Fiction, describes very vividly where oil and gas can be found and where these resources are actually formed.
Views: 75666 Wintershall
Rap-Rock Song & Lyrics About Natural Resources -Earth Science for Kids in Elementary & Middle School
 
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This is a Rap - Rock song with lyrics for kids in elementary, middle & high school, about Earth Science. In particular this is a song about natural resources - renewable and non-renewable. More info and free downloads here: http://brambarker.com/scirave/scirave.html#EarthScience · A natural resource can be renewable or nonrenewable. Renewable resources, like trees, replace themselves quickly. Nonrenewable resources, like coal, take thousands or million of years to replace. · People use many resources faster than the earth replaces them. Recycling is a process that treats materials for reuse so that we don’t have to gather as many resources from nature. · All energy resources can be traced back to the sun. The energy resource we use the most are fossil fuels. · Fossil fuels are nonrenewable. They form from the remains of dead organisms that are millions of years old. · Petroleum, or crude oil, is the liquid fossil fuel we get gasoline from. · Gaseous fossil fuels are natural gases. Natural gases power our kitchen stoves. · Coal is a solid fossil fuel that comes from buried, decomposed plant material. Coal is also a rock. · We are always looking for alternative energy sources because obtaining fossil fuels harms the environment. When coal is burned, sulfor dioxide is released and combines with the moisture in the air to make acid rain (sulfuric acid). · Nuclear energy is an alternative source of energy that comes from splitting the nuclei of atoms. This process is called fission, and it releases a lot of energy that is used to run electric generators in power plants. The waste products are easy to contain, but it is hard to know where to bury them. · Solar cells, like the ones on calculators, get their energy directly from the sun. Solar energy does not pollute like many other energy resources, but solar panels are very expensive to make. · Wind is another clean energy source. However, wind turbines are only effective in places where the wind is steady, such as California and north Texas. · Hydroelectric energy uses the power of falling water to make energy. Like wind energy, hydroelectric energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Dams built to harness this energy also hurt the fish populations and other wildlife. · Underground water is hot enough in some places to evaporate into steam. Geothermal energy uses the steam from natural vents called geysers to power electric generators. Download the free Scirave games: http://www.jmtour.com/scirave/index.htm http://stemscopes.com/scirave/ Songs commissioned by James Tour with funding from the National Science Foundation http://www.nsf.gov/ and are © Rice University http://www.rice.edu/
Views: 58523 Science Songs
Top 10 Renewable energy sources
 
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Top 10 renewable energy sources and their work process, Top 10 Renewable Energy Resources, What Are Sources of Renewable Energy?, Top 10 Energy Sources of the Future, Renewable energy, Top Clean Energy Resources, Power of the Future, Examples of Renewable Resources, Types of Renewable Energy, Top 10 Alternative Energy Stocks, 10 Different Sources of Energy, The 10 Best Renewable Energy, The World's 10 Largest Renewable Energy, world's most important renewable energy resource, types of renewable energy list, what is the best renewable energy, Top 10 Renewable Energy Technologies
Views: 51366 All Activity
If Green Energy Is So Great, Why Aren't We Using It?
 
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Green energy is getting better and cheaper, yet we still largely rely on fossil fuels. Why haven't we switched to solar and wind energy yet? Which Countries Will Be Underwater Due To Climate Change? - https://youtu.be/1ilC2ODaWSY Which Countries Run On 100% Renewable Energy? - https://youtu.be/SrmsQzRQPPw Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: What Would Happen If We Burned All The Fossil Fuels On Earth? http://www.popsci.com/burning-all-fossil-fuels-could-raise-sea-levels-by-200-feet "A new study published today in Science Advances finds that if we burn all of the remaining fossil fuels on Earth, almost all of the ice in Antarctica will melt, potentially causing sea levels to rise by as much as 200 feet--enough to drown most major cities in the world." Who's Winning The Battle To Replace Coal? http://www.forbes.com/sites/thebakersinstitute/2016/05/17/whos-winning-the-battle-to-replace-coal/#e9dc97c6b09f "Coal is losing the battle for the electricity future in the United States. Investment in new coal-fired generating capacity has dried up with its share of electricity generation dropping from 53% in 2000 to 34% in 2015." Electricity in the United States http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=electricity_in_the_United_States "In 2015, coal was used for about 33% of the 4 trillion kilowatthours of electricity generated in the United States. In addition to being burned to heat water for steam, natural gas can also be burned to produce hot combustion gases that pass directly through a natural gas turbine, spinning the turbine's blades to generate electricity." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of DNews! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00
Views: 339302 Seeker
Sci-Tech Labs: Fossil Fish
 
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In this activity, we use a Swedish fish to model how fossils (and fossil fuel) is made. Materials: • 1 Swedish Fish • 1 small container of playdough per item • (Optional) Aluminum Foil or other items Procedure 1. Take the playdough out of its packaging. 2. Make a pancake shape out of the playdough by using the palm of your hand to flatten the playdough. Keep playdough's thickness equal throughout and make sure that it stays as thick as a Swedish fish. The playdough represents the ground sediments. 3. Once you have your playdough pancake, take a Swedish fish from the bag. a. Make this into a story by having this fish be a fish from long ago. "He swam throughout the ocean, traveling far and wide. He was an old but happy fish. His time finally came and he passed away. When he did, he fell to the bottom of the ocean. After thousands of years, sediments covered him for hundreds of feet." 4. Fold the pancake in half so that the empty half folds over the fish. a. "There was so much sand and dirt above him that his body was under a lot of pressure." 5. Place some pressure on top by using the palm of your hand. Try not to squeeze so hard that you cannot open the playdough again. a. "His body decomposed long ago so that not much was left." 6. Open up the playdough so that your fish and the marking shows. 7. Remove the fish so that now you have two markings on either side. a. "By the time we found where the fish lay, this is what we found. This is how we know the fish lived. We can look at the markings to figure out how large the fish was, what type of fish was, and even what the fish liked to eat. This is what it means to study fossils. You try to figure out the life of the animal/plant, try to figure out how the world looked like, and finally, how it affected the future. Now, sometimes different things happen. Look at how glossy the fossil looks. In the right conditions, the parts of the fish that were left behind can turn into a fuel. In fact, that's where fossil fuels come from. Many of the things we use (including electricity and plastic) are made from these fossil fuels. 8. (Optional) Use other materials and see what happens. Like in the video, aluminum foil makes crevices but will not leave the glossy layer the Swedish fish makes. Science: • Fossil fuels are categorized as non-renewable resources. Non-renewable means that if we use that resource, our planet cannot make more to resupply the amount we used. It can also be used for something that takes a very long time (thousands of years) to make. • Fossil fuels are made from past organisms and the chemical reactions that happened afterwards. The energy these organisms had stored before their passing is the same energy we try to use when we burn them in engines or factories. • There are multiple types of fossil fuels. Each one is made by different biodegradable parts and has their own history on how they became a fuel source. These fossil fuels are often found together in different depths. Below is a list of the most widely used. o Petroleum "crude oil" -- is made out of the biodegraded parts of animals. Petroleum is a liquid fossil fuel used for a variety of different things including electricity generation, plastics, and medicine. The finer version of petroleum is made from plankton and other microorganisms. This version is what we use as gasoline for our cars and is also called oil. o Coal -- is made out of the remains of terrestrial plants. It is formed when the remains of these plants are put under pressure and hardened. Coal is a hard sedimentary rock and is the most abundant of the fossil fuels. Just like with petroleum, different classes of coal also exist, each with their own energy outputs. It is used mainly for the production of heat and electricity. In the U.S., 50% of our electricity is derived from coal, usually with a steam turbine and generator. o Natural Gas -- is a gas made out of the remains of microorganisms. Mostly methane, natural gas is considered clean compared to the other two fossil fuels. This means that there are low environmental impacts from burning natural gas. • Use of fossil fuels has a variety of impacts on the environment. Greenhouse gas, acid rain and smog are three examples of the impact from their use. There are also consequences when it comes to removal of these fossil fuels as forests and mountains have to be cleared to set up the equipment. In recent news, fracking has become an issue as that can also pollute our water. Lastly, transportation of the fuels has made environmental disasters in various areas of the world including the Gulf of Mexico and the waters of Alaska. • Despite the problems associated, fossil fuels continue to be the most widely used fuel source due to their cheap economical nature. While alternative renewable resources are being researched, all of them have their own pros and cons. It is up to the people to find a balance.
Views: 1956 SciTechDiscovery
A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-guide-to-the-energy-of-the-earth-joshua-m-sneideman Energy is neither created nor destroyed — and yet the global demand for it continues to increase. But where does energy come from, and where does it go? Joshua M. Sneideman examines the many ways in which energy cycles through our planet, from the sun to our food chain to electricity and beyond. Lesson by Joshua M. Sneideman, animation by Marc Christoforidis.
Views: 446474 TED-Ed
Humans and Energy: Crash Course World History 207
 
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In which Stan Muller subs for John Green and teaches you about energy and humanity. Today we discuss the ideas put forth by Alfred Crosby in his book, Children of the Sun. Historically, almost all of the energy that humans use has been directly or indirectly generated by the sun, whether that be food energy from plants, wind energy, direct solar energy, or fossil fuels. Stan looks into these different sources, and talks about how humanity will continue to use energy in the future as populations grow and energy resources become more scarce. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. SUBBABLE SPONSOR MESSAGES! TO: Dana FROM: Cameron you're wonderful, I can't wait for our faces to meet :) TO: TheGeekyBlonde FROM: Arbace Thanks for your outstanding Youtube Abuse Recovery video! http://youtu.be/3Uc5eNNG60o You can get Alfred Crosby's Children of the Sun here: http://smile.amazon.com/Children-Sun-Humanitys-Unappeasable-Appetite/dp/0393931536/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409260623&sr=8-1&keywords=crosby+children+of+the+sun
Views: 1061621 CrashCourse
300 Years of FOSSIL FUELS in 300 Seconds
 
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*** (19. MARCH 2011) WINNER OF YOUTUBE'S BEST NONPROFIT VIDEO AWARD!!! *** Fossil fuels have powered human growth and ingenuity for centuries. Now that we're reaching the end of cheap and abundant oil and coal supplies, we're in for an exciting ride. While there's a real risk that we'll fall off a cliff, there's still time to control our transition to a post-carbon future. A deeper analysis of the crises we face, and possible solutions we can work on right now can be had HERE: http://j.mp/PCReader +++ TRANSLATIONS currently uploaded as Closed Captions -- Dutch, English, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish. OTHER TRANSLATIONS: SPANISH DUBBED: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIydcOn_3kI PORTUGUESE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9l6jkqv63lU HEBREW: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4zP4Xhj4AQ SIMPLIFIED CHINESE subtitles: http://www.tudou.com/playlist/p/l11764222i95039245.html TRADITIONAL CHINESE subtitles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOBSAYP1LpU FRENCH subtitles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5SaC-luI98, dubbed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeEU_uy4YrQ&feature=player_embedded SONG CREDIT: "Can I Kick It?" by Tribe Called Quest
Views: 1591413 postcarboninstitute
RENEWABLE AND NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCES | AZIMUTH SOFTWARE
 
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Environmental Friendliness Elearning Course. Awareness about our environment. Renewable and Non-renewable Resources
Which Power Source Is Most Efficient?
 
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Australian researchers just unveiled the most efficient solar panels ever. How efficient are they, and what is the most efficient source of energy? Get 15% off http://www.domain.com's s domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code DNEWS at checkout! Read More: In world first -- UNSW researchers convert sunlight to electricity with over 40 percent efficiency http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-12/uons-iwf120514.php "UNSW Australia's solar researchers have converted over 40% of the sunlight hitting a solar system into electricity, the highest efficiency ever reported." New world record for solar cell efficiency at 46% French-German cooperation confirms competitive advantages of European photovoltaic industry http://www.ise.fraunhofer.de/en/press-and-media/press-releases/press-releases-2014/new-world-record-for-solar-cell-efficiency-at-46-percent "A new world record for the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity has been established." Australia develops world's most efficient solar panels http://rt.com/business/212383-australia-record-solar-energy/ "?Australian researchers have developed a new method of using commercial solar panels that converts more electricity from sunlight than ever before." What is the efficiency of different types of power plants? http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=107&t=3 "One measure of the efficiency of a power plant that converts a fuel into heat and into electricity is the heat rate." Improving Efficiencies http://www.worldcoal.org/coal-the-environment/coal-use-the-environment/improving-efficiencies/ "Improving efficiency levels increases the amount of energy that can be extracted from a single unit of coal." The Most Common Electricity Sources in the U.S. http://pureenergies.com/us/blog/the-most-common-electricity-sources-in-the-u-s/ "Though renewable energy is growing fast, the U.S. still gets the vast majority of its power from conventional power plants." Increasing the Efficiency of Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43343.pdf "Coal has long been the major fossil fuel used to produce electricity." Coal Will Survive as Efficient Power Plants Boost Demand http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-02/coal-seen-surving-as-efficient-power-plants-boost-demand.html "President Barack Obama's plan to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions left coal with a future even as the industry accuses him of trying to make the fuel obsolete." How Do Wind Turbines Work? http://energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work "So how do wind turbines make electricity?" Screwy-looking wind turbine makes little noise and a big claim http://www.gizmag.com/the-archimedes-liam-f1-urban-wind-turbine/32263/ "Although it's getting increasingly common to see solar panels on the roofs of homes, household wind turbines are still a fairly rare sight." Betz's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betz%27s_law Wind Energy More Energy Efficient than Fossil Fuels http://cleantechnica.com/2012/07/18/wind-energy-energy-efficient-fossil-fuels-uk/ "Here's something that may surprise you. Wind energy is more efficient than carbon-based fuels." Wind Energy's Shadow: Turbines Drag Down Power Potential http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/05/130516-wind-energy-shadow-effect/ "As seemingly limitless as the air that swirls around us, wind has proven to be the world's fastest-growing source of renewable energy." Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle/Power-Reactors/Advanced-Nuclear-Power-Reactors/ "The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades and is starting to build the next generation of nuclear power reactors to fill new orders." Hydroelectric Power http://www.mpoweruk.com/hydro_power.htm "Hydro-electric power, using the potential energy of rivers, now supplies 17.5% of the world's electricity (99% in Norway, 57% in Canada, 55% in Switzerland, 40% in Sweden, 7% in USA)." Hydroelectric Power http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf "It's a form of energy ... a renewable resource." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 644613 Seeker
Safety Smart® Science with Bill Nye the Science Guy®: Renewable Energy -- PREVIEW
 
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Bill Nye the Science Guy® explores the science of renewable energy and demonstrates how we can use science and technology to engineer a brighter tomorrow. Using his trademark blend of hands-on demos and humor, Bill Explains Newton's First Law. Then, he's off to the Renewable Energy Lab at UL to compare renewable and non-renewable energy sources such as fossil fuels, solar, wind, and hydroelectricity. Languages: English and Spanish http://www.dep-store.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=77E42VL00 For more information, go to www.DisneyEducation.com.
Using Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Drilling for Natural Gas Production
 
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Geologists have long known about huge natural gas deposits trapped in shale rock formations, but it is only over the past decade that energy companies have combined two established technologies to unlock this resource. See how Chevron uses horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to safely produce natural gas from shale. For more about Chevron's shale gas business, visit [http://www.chevron.com/deliveringenergy/naturalgas/shalegas/]. To watch more Chevron Human Energy Stories, visit http://www.chevron.com/stories/
Views: 38519 Chevron
Renewable Energy Explained in 2 1/2 Minutes
 
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This is an unofficial explainer video I created for a college project. I decided to gear it toward TheSolutionsProject.org. The assets went from Adobe Illustrator to After Effects. This animation explains the different types of energy such as, fossil fuels, biomass, nuclear and renewables. Written, animated and illustrated by Dane Bliss Music by: Essa: https://soundcloud.com/essa-1 Voiceover by: Mike Porter: https://goo.gl/GNouYE Visit my online portfolio to see some more work at http://www.DaneBliss.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaneBlissDesign Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dane-Bliss-Graphic-Design-813194572110628/timeline/ German translation by Robert Orzanna Twitter: https://twitter.com/orschiro
Views: 402736 Dane Bliss Design
Coal 101
 
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Coal is a combustible black or dark brown rock consisting of carbonized plant matter, found mainly in underground deposits and widely for electricity production. Learn more about coal and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 85138 Student Energy
Electricity,  its sources, renewable and non renewable.Science for kids.
 
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What is Electricity? What are its sources? Why is it important to conserve electricity?What are some basic facts of electricity? These are some of the questions addressed in this video. What is electricity? Electricity is nothing but energy. We eat food every day and this gives us energy- Similarly, electricity gives machines and gadgets energy. Electricity can be generated using the following • Power stations • Wind • Sun • Water • Battery The electricity is generated using one of the sources mentioned above. It is then to transformers which push the electricity long distances using high-voltage transmission lines via pylons. The substation further distributes the electricity to the neighbourhood areas like houses, factories etc. Power Station Different power stations use different types of fuel, some of which are: coal, oil, gas and even rubbish. These fuels get burnt and then get made into electricity. Wind: Windmills use the power of wind to spin a turbine to make electricity. Blowing wind spins the blades on a wind turbine - just like when you blow on a toy pinwheel. When the blades turn, the turbine is operating and electricity is generated. Solar Energy: It means energy (light or heat) that comes from the sun. A Solar panel also called as photovoltaic panels are used to create electricity from the sun. Water: The force of the falling water from rivers or lakes creates electricity also known as hydro electricity. The water is held behind a dam, forming an artificial lake, or reservoir. The force of the water being released from the reservoir through the dam spins the blades of a giant turbine. The turbine is connected to the generator that makes electricity as it spins. After passing through the turbine, the water flows back into the river on the other side of the dam. ==========================================================
Views: 77183 funza Academy
How Gasoline is Made: "The Story of Gasoline" 1928 US Bureau of Mines; Oil Refining
 
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Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney Chemistry playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_KyuOalV6rwHjo810Zaa6xq more at http://auto-parts.quickfound.net 'Department of the Interior. Bureau of Mines. Pittsburgh Experiment Station. (1934 - 01/19/1975) ARC Identifier 12422 / Local Identifier 70.99 1924 The Story of Gasoline Reel 1, crude oil is pumped to a refinery where gasoline is extracted by distillation. Reel 2, further distilling removes impurities from crude gasoline. Reel 3 consists mostly of laboratory tests of gasoline. Shows transportation in barrels, ships, tank cars, and trucks.' Produced in cooperation with the Standard Oil Company of Indiana. Silent. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Gasoline is a toxic, translucent, petroleum-derived liquid that is primarily used as a fuel in internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. Some gasolines also contain ethanol as an alternative fuel. In North America, the term "gasoline" is often shortened in colloquial usage to "gas", whereas most current or former Commonwealth nations use the term "petrol". Under normal ambient conditions its material state is liquid, unlike liquefied petroleum gas or "natural gas". Volatility Gasoline is more volatile than diesel oil, Jet-A, or kerosene, not only because of the base constituents, but also because of additives. Volatility is often controlled by blending with butane, which boils at -0.5 °C. The volatility of gasoline is determined by the Reid vapor pressure (RVP) test... Octane rating is measured relative to a mixture of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (an isomer of octane) and n-heptane. There are different conventions for expressing octane ratings, so a fuel may have several different octane ratings based on the measure used. Research octane number (RON) for commercially-available gasoline varies by country... In the UK, ordinary regular unleaded petrol is 91 RON... premium unleaded petrol is always 95 RON, and super unleaded is usually 97-98 RON. However, both Shell and BP produce fuel at 102 RON for cars with high-performance engines... In the US, octane ratings in unleaded fuels can vary between 86 and 87 AKI (91-92 RON) for regular, through 89-90 AKI (94-95 RON) for mid-grade, up to 90-94 AKI (95-99 RON) for premium. The octane rating became important as the military sought higher output for aircraft engines in the late 1930s and the 1940s. A higher octane rating allows a higher compression ratio, and thus higher temperatures and pressures, which translate to higher power output... Tetraethyl lead Gasoline, when used in high-compression internal combustion engines, has a tendency to autoignite (detonate) causing damaging "engine knocking" (also called "pinging" or "pinking") noise. Early research into this effect was led by A.H. Gibson and Harry Ricardo in England and Thomas Midgley and Thomas Boyd in the United States. The discovery that lead additives modified this behavior led to the widespread adoption of their use in the 1920s, and therefore more powerful, higher compression engines. The most popular additive was tetra-ethyl lead. With the discovery of the extent of environmental and health damage caused by the lead, however, and the incompatibility of lead with catalytic converters found on virtually all newly sold US automobiles since 1975, this practice began to wane (encouraged by many governments introducing differential tax rates) in the 1980s. In the US, where lead had been blended with gasoline (primarily to boost octane levels) since the early 1920s, standards to phase out leaded gasoline were first implemented in 1973 - due in great part to studies conducted by Philip J. Landrigan. In 1995, leaded fuel accounted for only 0.6% of total gasoline sales and less than 2000 short tons (1814 t) of lead per year. From 1 January 1996, the Clean Air Act banned the sale of leaded fuel for use in on-road vehicles. Possession and use of leaded gasoline in a regular on-road vehicle now carries a maximum $10,000 fine in the US. However, fuel containing lead may continue to be sold for off-road uses, including aircraft, racing cars, farm equipment, and marine engines.
Views: 6596 Jeff Quitney
The Largest Oil Rig in The World
 
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Perdido is the deepest floating oil rig (platform) in the world at a water depth of about 2450 meters operated by the Shell Oil Company in the Gulf of Mexico. The Perdido is located in the Perdido fold belt which is a rich discovery of crude oil and natural gas that lies in water that is nearly 8000 feet deep. The platform's peak production will be 100,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day. At 267 meters, the Perdido is nearly as tall as the Eiffel Tower. An oil rig is a large structure with facilities to drill wells, to extract and process oil and natural gas, and to temporarily store product until it can be brought to shore for refining and marketing. In many cases, the platform contains facilities to house the workforce as well. Perdido Oil Platform https://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/perdido-oil-platform.html Troll A Platform http://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/troll-platform.html Offshore Oil Drilling History http://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/offshore-oil-drilling-history.html Oil History http://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/oil-history.html Trans-Alaska Pipeline System http://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/trans-alaska-pipeline-system.html Snow White Gas Refinery http://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/snow-white-gas-refinery.html Oil Tankers https://engineers-channel.blogspot.com/p/oil-tankers.html
Views: 5880224 Largest Dams
Why You Should Love Fossil Fuel
 
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Every year on Earth Day we learn how bad humanity's economic development is for the health of the planet. But maybe this is the wrong message. Maybe we should instead reflect on how human progress, even use of fossil fuels, has made our environment cleaner and healthier. Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Every year on Earth Day, we're supposed to reflect on all the ways we've made the planet worse. But what if we try something different? What if we reflect on all the ways we've made the planet better? Try this thought experiment: Imagine that we transported someone from three hundred years ago, at the very start of the Industrial Revolution, to today's world. What would he think about our environment? Without question, his reaction would be one of disbelief; not that we had destroyed his pristine, natural world, but that such a clean, healthy environment was possible. "The air is so clean," our time traveler might say. "Where I come from, we're breathing in smoke all day from the fire we need to burn in our furnaces and stoves." "And the water. Everywhere I go, the water tastes so fresh, and it's all safe to drink. On my farm, we get our water from a brook we share with animals, and my kids are always getting sick." "And then the weather. I mean, the weather isn't that much different, but you're so much safer in it; you can move a knob and make it cool when it's hot, and warm when it's cold." "And what happened to all the disease? In my time, we had insects everywhere giving us disease -- my neighbor's son died of malaria -- and you don't seem to have any of that here. What's your secret?" I'd tell him that the secret was energy, specifically energy derived from fossil fuels -- oil, coal and natural gas. These fuels power machines that allow us to transform our naturally hazardous environment into a far healthier environment. Most of the natural world is too hot or too cold, has too much rainfall or not enough. Then there's bacteria-filled water, disease carrying insects, tornadoes, earthquakes and tsunamis, to name just few of nature's other unpleasant features. As our time traveler noted, 300 years ago human beings spent a lot of time breathing polluted air from indoor fires. As unhealthy as it was, it was worth the warmth. But we've been able to conquer all these environmental hazards. We've drained swamps, reclaimed land, cleared forests, built roads, constructed glass and steel skyscrapers. We've irrigated deserts, developed fertilizers and pesticides, linked oceans -- all of it in humanity's incredibly successful effort to create a safer, cleaner, more habitable world. And we did most of this using machines running on cheap, plentiful, reliable energy from fossil fuels. To be sure, using that energy has carried risks and created negative by-products. But thanks to technology, we get better and better at minimizing and neutralizing those risks. Los Angeles was once smog city. Now its air is cleaner than it's been in decades. London's Thames River was once clogged with sewage; now it's clean. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/why-you-should-love-fossil-fuel
Views: 691096 PragerU
Fuel Energy: Types of Fuels and Heating Resources
 
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After completing this chapter, the students will be able to recognize various types of fuels and heating resources that come in daily life uses in our houses. Identify and categories various types of fuels with their heating resource. Subscribe to our channel to avail the benefits of Genee India's interactive education tutorials. Click here. http://www.youtube.com/subscribe_widget?p=GeneeIndiaPvtLtd Tell Your Friends about Genee http://www.facebook.com/Genee.Technologies.India.Pvt.Ltd http://twitter.com/GeneeIndia/ http://www.linkedin.com/company/genee-technologies-india-pvt-ltd http://plus.google.com/112885220724069159245 What Genee Technologies India is all about? http://www.genee-india.com We need your invaluable feedback. Help us get even better! http://www.genee-india.com/get-a-quote/
Titan™ ETEM G2 - environmental TEM
 
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Catalysts are essential for environmental protection, energy production, chemical supplies, fuel upgrading, and the effective use of natural resources, with the most rapid growth in the use of catalysts being in the automotive and chemical industries. For scientists working in these areas, it is extremely important for them to be able to observe chemical reactions and catalyst changes that are taking place at the nano- and atomic-scale. Titan™ ETEM G2 is a dedicated environmental TEM, designed for in situ chemical reactions and catalysis experiments. With the Titan ETEM you can: Observe functional nanomaterials and their time-resolved response to gas and temperature stimuli Study gas-solid interactions, including shape and morphology, and interaction at surfaces and interfaces Gain insight at the atomic-scale to geometric and electronic structure, and chemical composition of functional nanomaterials. FEI Company's Website : https://www.fei.com/ Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/FEICompany/
National Park Saves Natural Resources with Alternative Fuels
 
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Watch how the Great Smoky Mountains National Park uses alternative fuel vehicles.
Views: 157 CleanCitiesTV
Renewable Energy
 
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028 - Renewable Energy In this video Paul Andersen discusses the technology, advantages and disadvantages of six sources of renewable energy; biomass, hydroelectric, solar, geothermal wind, and hydrogen. He also explains how changes in the storage and flow of energy in our power grid must be improved. He also lists the energy returned over energy invested ration for the various forms of energy. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: afloresm. (2007). Español: Solúcar PS10 es una planta solar termoeléctrica por tecnología de torre, la primera en el mundo explotada comercialmente. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PS10_solar_power_tower.jpg Andrewglaser. (2009). English: The Solar Settlement with the Sun Ship in the background: Freiburg, Germany. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SoSie%2BSoSchiff_Ansicht.jpg Canada, A. D. from W. Yukon. (2012). Woodpile. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Woodpile_(6885117855).jpg company, J. J. owner of A. H. S. an appliance. (2013). English: Here is a picture of a man stoking the fire in a wood burning stove. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stoking-the-fire.JPG Delphi234. (2014). English: Total world energy consumption by source 2013, from REN21 Renewables 2014 Global Status Report. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Total_World_Energy_Consumption_by_Source_2013.png EarthBy barretr. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/3320/earth Energy, D. of. (2010). English: Geothermal energy setup. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GEOTHERMAL_ENERGY_tapping.png en.wikipedia, O. uploader was V. at. (2007). English: A particle motion in an ocean wave. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wave_motion-i18n-mod.svg Germany, J. from S. (2005). English: Wind turbines in a rapeseed field in Sandesneben, Germany. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alternative_Energies.jpg Hijau, B. (2008). Wood fuel heater. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wood_fuel_heater20080102.jpg Hillewaert, H. (2008). English: Newly constructed windmills D4 (nearest) to D1 on the Thornton Bank. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Windmills_D1-D4_(Thornton_Bank).jpg http://www.eere.energy.gov. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). English: Passive solar heating illustration. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Illust_passive_solar_d1.gif Institut, P. (2006). Original Passivhaus, Darmstadt, in spring. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Passivhaus_Darmstadt_Kranichstein_Fruehling_2006.JPG KVDP. (2008). English: A picture of a house fitted with thermodynamic panels. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ThermodynamicPanelsInstalled.jpg Ledebur, A. (1895). English: Charcoal pile. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Meule_charbon_bois.jpg m, dan. (2007). English: Power grid Gowkthrapple Pylons and power cables. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Power_grid_Gowkthrapple_-_geograph.org.uk_-_626930.jpg Photographer, D. A. R. (2005). English: Title: Technology: Lab. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ethyl_alcohol_usp_grade.jpg Rolypolyman. (2008). English: United States Power Grid. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:UnitedStatesPowerGrid.jpg Romary. (2007). Français : Charbon de bois. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charbon_de_bois_rouge.jpg Shilsholepointe.com, E. S. (2010). English: Reporting from ShilsholePointe.com Geo Homes,. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Geothermal_shilsholepointe.jpg Shizhao拍摄. (2005). English: Biodiesel sample. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Biodiesel.JPG Technologies, O. P. (2011). English: OPT’s PB150 PowerBuoy. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Optbuoy.jpg
Views: 90544 Bozeman Science
Where Does All Our Oil Come From?
 
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We rely on oil to power our lives, but how do we go about getting it? How does oil even form? Read More: Fossil Fuel http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/f/fossil_fuel.htm "Fossil fuels are hydrocarbons, primarily coal, fuel oil or natural gas, formed from the remains of dead plants and animals." If We Dig Out All Our Fossil Fuels, Here's How Hot We Can Expect It to Get http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/upshot/if-we-dig-out-all-our-fossil-fuels-heres-how-hot-we-can-expect-it-to-get.html?abt=0002&abg=1 "World leaders are once again racing to avert disastrous levels of global warming through limits on greenhouse gas emissions." How Oil Drilling Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/oil-drilling4.htm "Once the equipment is at the site, the crew sets the rig up." How Hydraulic Fracking Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydraulic-fracking.htm "With tumultuous gas prices and dependence on unsustainable fossil fuels at a high, there's a desperate need to find alternative energy sources" How do we get oil and gas out of the ground? http://www.world-petroleum.org/index.php?/Education/how-do-we-get-oil-and-gas-out-of-the-ground.html "Oil and gas can get trapped in pockets underground such as where the rocks are folded into an umbrella shape." A cleaner way to get petroleum out of oil sands http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-process-washes-the-petroleum-off-oil-sands/ "The secret to business is buy low and sell high. Canadian holding company MCW Energy Group hopes to do that by economically separating the petroleum from oil sands and then selling it at market rates of double to triple the processing costs." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Julia Wilde on Twitter https://twitter.com/julia_sci DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 132259 Seeker
Class _ 8 _ Science _ Coal and Petroleum
 
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Coal and Petroleum
Views: 138041 Eduvantage Pro

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