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Learn English with Emma: vocabulary, culture, and the first conditional!
 
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I will use one topic to teach you important English grammar (the first conditional), as well as vocabulary. You'll also learn a lot about North American culture. I'll teach you all this stuff by talking about superstitions. Is the number 13 bad luck in your culture? If you break a mirror, will you have bad luck? If you find a penny on the ground, do you think you will have a good day? Every culture has beliefs about luck. We call these beliefs superstitions. Some superstitions are common around the world, but many are very specific to a particular country or culture. My mom is really superstitious, so I grew up with a lot of these beliefs. In this video, I'll give you some examples of common North American superstitions, and in the second half of the video, I'll use this topic to teach you how to use the first conditional in English. Watch this video now. If you don't, your computer might get a virus. Take the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-superstitions-first-conditional/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to be talking about three different things. Okay? So, we are going to be learning some new vocabulary that have to do with superstition, and I'll explain what superstitions are; we're going to be learning about culture, and Western culture, and North American culture; as well as grammar, today we are going to be learning about the first conditional. So this is a great video because you are going to be learning a lot by the end of it, hopefully. So, let's get started. First I want to tell you about superstitions. I love the topic of superstitions; I think it's very interesting. So, what a superstition is, is it is a belief, and this belief, it's usually cultural, but it can also be personal. Okay? And this belief is not based in science, so it's not scientific. Oftentimes when we're talking about superstitions we're talking about supernatural things, we're talking about good luck, bad luck, curses, you know, we're talking about things maybe from our culture's history and a different way of seeing the world. So if you're confused about superstitions, don't worry, when I give you examples you will start to really understand what a superstition is. Okay, so let's start off with an example. Imagine this: I took a test and I did really well. I got a very high score on my test. Now, why did I get a high score? Maybe you think: "Oh, you probably studied well." Okay? So that might be kind of a scientific explanation. "Oh, Emma studied, so she did well on her test." Well, maybe I brought a pen to the test and it's a very lucky pen or a very lucky pencil, and I think anytime I use this pen or pencil I'm going to do well. It's my lucky charm, it's my lucky pen or pencil. If you think I did well on my test because I have a lucky pen, then that would be an example of a superstition. It's like a ritual you do to get good luck or to keep bad luck from happening, and it's a belief about these types of things. Okay? So, if for example, I say: "I did great on my test because I brought a lucky pen to class.", "I did really well on my test because it was, you know, at 7pm and 7 is a lucky number so therefore, you know, 7pm means I'm going to do well on my test. And I wore green, and green's a lucky colour, so all these reasons helped me on my test", you would say I'm superstitious. Okay? So, "superstition" is a belief, it's a cultural belief that explains something in the world, but not based in science. A person is "superstitious". We use "superstitious" to describe people. My mother is the most superstitious person I know. She is very superstitious. In our house there are many superstitions. Okay? And that's true. I grew up in a very superstitious household. So let's look at some Western superstitions I grew up with. These are the ones that were in my own experience and my own culture. So, one example of a superstition is if you walk under a ladder, this is very bad luck. Okay? So when I walk down the street, if I see a ladder, I never walk under it because I'm also very superstitious. If you find a penny, so a penny is a type of... It's a type of currency or a type of... It's a form of money, it's a coin, and if you find a penny... If I ever find a penny, I always pick it up. Okay? I pick it up off the ground because I think the penny will give me good luck. Okay? A little crazy, I know, but a lot of people in North America do this. 13 is considered a very unlucky number. In Western culture you'll notice a lot of apartment buildings do not have a 13th floor, and that's because people think it's so... They think it's very unlucky, so they don't want to live on the 13th floor because they think they will, you know, have bad luck. I know in China the number 4 is very unlucky, and so it's the same thing. In China you don't see... In apartment buildings you usually don't see a 4th floor because it's very unlucky. Okay, so we've talked about some good luck and some bad luck.
A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
Articles -  a, an & the  -  English Grammar lesson
 
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Articles - a, an & the - English Grammar lesson Take the quiz - http://www.learnex.in/articles-a-an-the/ The 3 articles in English are a, an and the. The learner has to decide noun-by-noun which one of the articles to use. In fact, there are 4 choices to make, because sometimes no article is necessary. Native-speakers, of course, use the articles correctly without thinking. English learners, on the other hand, need to have some guidelines for making the right choice - particularly those learners whose own language does not have articles. The guidelines that follow in this lesson should help ESL students to a basic understanding of English article use. The words a, an and the are known as articles. • We use an before words that begin with vowels (a,e,i,o,u). E.g. I found an orange boat. However there are few exceptions like the words honest and hour. In the words honest and hour the alphabet h is silent and therefore the letter o becomes the first alphabet of the word and hence we use the article an. E.g. Mr. Smith is an honest man. I will be with you in an hour. We use a before words that begin with consonants (all the letters of the alphabet except the vowels). E.g. Bumble is a baby elephant. • We use the before words that we have already spoken about. E.g. I bought an apple. The apple is very sweet.
Grammar: 8 rules for using 'THE' in English
 
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United States or The United States? U.K. or The U.K.? Unsure of when to use a definite or an indefinite article? Watch this lesson and stop making these common mistakes in English! For many non-native speakers of English who don't have articles in their own language, it can be really difficult to use articles correctly. Even for speakers of languages that have articles, it is difficult to get your use of articles right 100% of the time. This is because there are many exceptions and irregular grammar rules. In this lesson, I'll teach you what these exceptions are, so you can be sure to remove these common mistakes from your English. Even if you are an advanced speaker of English, I'm sure you will discover one or two rules that you didn't know about. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/grammar-8-rules-the/ TRANSCRIPT http://www.engvid.com United States or The United States? U.K. or The U.K.? Unsure of when to use a definite or an indefinite article? Watch this lesson and stop making these common mistakes in English! For many non-native speakers of English who don't have articles in their own language, it can be really difficult to use articles correctly. Even for speakers of languages that have articles, it is difficult to get your use of articles right 100% of the time. This is because there are many exceptions and irregular grammar rules. In this lesson, I'll teach you what these exceptions are, so you can be sure to remove these common mistakes from your English. Even if you are an advanced speaker of English, I'm sure you will discover one or two rules that you didn't know about. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/grammar-8-rules-the/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. In this lesson today, we're looking at the rules for articles, but more specifically, the rules where we have exceptions in using articles. So when I'm observing people's English, all the time I'm hearing the same mistakes with articles. So what you will learn to do in this lesson is how to avoid those really, really common mistakes I hear all the time. If you're somebody who just doesn't use articles at all because in your native language, you don't have articles, I understand it can be really, really hard to start using them. But they are an important aspect of grammar, and you should be using them. So if you watch this lesson, you'll get some tips for using articles, where you need them, and where you shouldn't use them. And also, if you're someone who's getting articles right nearly all the time, I'm quite sure that you will pick up one or two rules here that you didn't know before. So let's get started. There are eight different rules. Rule No. 1: When we're talking about countries, most countries we don't use an article. So here some sentences. "She lives in England. They live in America." We don't use articles. But if the country's considered to be a nation state, a collection of different states, or a collection of different countries in one bigger state, then we use articles. Here are examples. So "the U.S.A., the U.K., the U.A.E." -- where I spend a lot of my time -- and here are -- also, we need to mention islands. When a country is a group of islands, we always use articles. So we would say "the Virgin Islands", and we'd say "the Philippines" as well. It's interesting that we can say, "She lives in England" because England is one country, but when talking about the same -- okay, it's not exactly the same place, the U.K., because it's -- the U.K. is more than one country. It's more than just England. But sometimes people think of it as being the same place. It's not. When we're talking about the U.K., we need an article, but just for "England", it's okay not to use an article. Let's take a look at rule No. 2. Rule No. 2 -- this is a really subtle rule, here. And this one I always correct in sentences. When people talk about meals -- breakfast, lunch, dinner, also brunch is a meal you might not know. It's in between breakfast and lunch. -- we don't use articles. So here's a correct sentence. "I don't eat breakfast." I'm talking in general there. "I don't eat breakfast." That's okay to say. However, if I'm being specific, "We didn't like the dinner", it's okay to use an article here. You need to. So what does the sentence actually mean? Imagine that we were out last night, and we had a meal. And now, we're talking about it. "Well, the place was nice, but I didn't like the dinner." Being specific about that experience we had. If I'm talking in general, "I don't like dinner", that would just mean all the time, okay? So it's a very big difference in meaning. Now, we'll look at rule No. 3 for jobs. Jobs take the indefinite article. That's a grammar word. And "indefinite article" means "a". We don't use "the".
Eliciting and Concept Checking at Transworld Schools
 
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Please visit ESLfocus.com to get much more useful information for anything related to ESL. We have plenty of articles, tips, and forums.
Views: 33445 transworldesl
Vocabulary | Kitchen Vocabulary | English vocabulary
 
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Kitchen Vocabulary For Kids to Learn in fun way all kinds of Kitchen tools with pictures, preschool and education video, Great educational video for nursery and preschoolers, cool preschool and kindergarten learning video, teach your children the Kitchen vocabulary and let them improve their vocabulary with YoYoTV. Subscribe to YoYo TV: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr3l... Other learning / vocabulary videos : Games Vocabulary https://youtu.be/6rKoSPnPmP8 Family Vocabulary https://youtu.be/4fMr48POqB8 School Vocabulary https://youtu.be/o6nQQraEN90 learning Babies & Kids Vocabulary https://youtu.be/Sfv6QCcACsk learning medicince vocabulary https://youtu.be/CD5X3yO8KrU Learning shapes https://youtu.be/tCJ7XW0PVMQ Learning Colors https://youtu.be/qIDedWQWcWA Learning Numbers https://youtu.be/ypY1bHb94FU Learning Letters https://youtu.be/6cJ-QRGMbNg pot pan spatula teapot knife spoon fork whisk grater peeler strainer rolling pin measuring cup apron juicer pizza cutter muffin pan mittens blender mixer food processor toaster stove microwave oven refrigerator can jar sponge detergent
Views: 1102439 YoYo TV
1 Simple Method to Increase Your Vocabulary | The 3R Technique | How to Improve Your Vocabulary
 
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Learn 1 simple method to increase your vocabulary. This is the 3R technique. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you 1 simple method that you can use to increase your vocabulary. This is the technique that I teach my students, and this is also what I use personally to learn new words – so I know that this works. So what is this technique? Well, it’s the 3R method. It’s called 3R because there are three steps: Read, Record and Review. I will show you how to do all three of these correctly to get the best results. So let’s talk about the first step: Read. If there’s one secret to building your vocabulary, it’s reading. There is simply no better way. You should aim to read for an hour per day. If that’s difficult, do at least half an hour, i.e. 30 minutes but one hour per day will give you the most benefit. Now I’m not talking about reading the newspaper or studying textbooks. That kind of reading is good but it’s not the best way to learn new words. For that, you need to read what is interesting. So here’s an idea: pick something that you’re really interested in. Like sports, movies, music, cars, fitness, fashion, electronics etc. - whatever you feel passionate about. Then find material that you will enjoy reading. Some great examples are magazines, novels, short stories or biographies related to your topic. And don’t forget the internet – one of my favorite places for reading online is Wikipedia. There are millions of articles on this site and whatever your topic of interest is, you can go on Wikipedia and find articles to read. Now, there’s something really important. When you read (whether it’s books or online material), there will be many words that are difficult – that you don’t understand. But don’t look up every single one of these in a dictionary. Because that will distract you and make you bored. Instead, your focus should be to just understand the overall idea of what you are reading. For any difficult words, try to guess the meaning from the surrounding information. If you cannot, mark them with a pencil, or write them down and you can come back to them after you finish reading. After you have finished reading, you move on to step 2 – record. This is where you collect new words. So now, you go back to the text you read and find words to learn – there are two types of words that you can learn – unknown words (words that you don’t know), and inactive words (these are words that you have seen before but you’re not sure how to use). Aim to collect about 5-10 new words every day. Once you have the words, you’re going to note them down in a notebook, on your computer (in a Microsoft Word or Excel file) or even your smartphone (there are many apps that will let you save and learn vocabulary). Start by taking your first word and look it up in a dictionary. I personally prefer to use online dictionaries like Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster. And now, you can start to record the word. Let’s look at the best way to do that. In your notebook or file, first write the word - let’s say ‘creative’ is the word you’re learning. From your dictionary, you should then write what part of speech it is (that is, whether it’s a noun, verb, adjective, adverb etc.). This word is an adjective. Then you write its definition – ‘creative’ means ‘having the ability to produce original ideas’ - it can describe people or activities. Then you note any example sentences that you can find or you can make sentences of your own. Here are a couple of examples: “Frank Zappa was a highly creative musician.” “Children enjoy doing creative activities.” Along with this, you should also note down the correct pronunciation of the word in phonetic symbols. This word is pronounced /kri ˈeɪ.tɪv/. There are three syllables – /kri/, /eɪ/, and /tɪv/ with the stress on /eɪ/ – /kriˈeɪ.tɪv/. You might not know these symbols very well, that’s OK. With the dictionary, practice the correct pronunciation a few times, then copy the symbols. Over time, you will become comfortable with them. It’s also a good idea to make a note of the reference – that is, where you learned the word: which book, website etc. Because, later, when you are reviewing the word, you can more easily recall where you saw it, and you can also go to the same website or book if you want to check how it’s used. You should also try to find and note down the different forms of the word. For example, we said that the word ‘creative’ is an adjective. But it has other forms too.
Views: 750890 Learn English Lab
Kids vocabulary - Clothes - clothing - Learn English for kids - English educational video
 
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http://www.youtube.com/user/EnglishSingsing9 Kids vocabulary - Clothes - clothing - my clothes - Learn English for kids - English educational video This "Kids Vocabulary" category has been grouped thematically. We hope you enjoy studying with our channel videos. Have fun and subscribe to our channel. Then, you can find some more various English educational animation videos. ★ Subscribe us on YouTube: http://goo.gl/gDa963 -- Title: Clothes -- What should I wear today? t-shirt t-shirt jeans jeans blouse blouse skirt skirt sweater sweater pants pants dress dress cardigan cardigan jacket jacket vest vest coat coat cap cap gloves gloves hat hat scarf scarf boots boots sneakers sneakers shoes shoes handbag handbag What should I wear today? t-shirt t-shirt jeans jeans jacket jacket cap cap sneakers sneakers Thanks for checking out the "English Singsing". © Amanta Inc.
Views: 2055433 English Singsing
Learn English with 5 Jokes
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you want to be the life of the party? Do you like clever word jokes? This is the lesson for you! Learn to understand five easy jokes that use double meanings to be funny. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll learn. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-with-5-jokes/
Learn English: Basic Kitchen Vocabulary
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Let's go in the kitchen and cook! You will learn basic kitchen vocabulary to help you in the kitchen! You can use an oven to bake a cake, a kettle to make tea, and a fry pan to cook eggs! After watching this lesson, check out Adam's lesson on more advanced cooking vocabulary at http://www.engvid.com/cooking-vocabulary/ and take the quiz on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/basic-kitchen-vocabulary/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. Are you hungry? You better get to the kitchen. "The chicken? The kitchen." Chicken -- kitchen. Today, I'm going to teach you about vocabulary that you will find very useful if you've ever been in a kitchen. Now, the thing that's confusing sometimes is that when you want to say "kitchen", you say "chicken". Oh, no! It's okay. It's funny. I do it all the time. Do I do it all the time? It's a very natural mistake. So if you're ever having a conversation in English, and you say "chicken" instead of "kitchen", don't worry. But we're going to go through some kitchen vocabulary. My name is Ronnie. Let me take you through the magic of the kitchen. The very, very first word that I'm going to teach you is "nuke". "Nuke?" "Nuke" is a verb, and it's a new word from the 1980s. That's so new. It's 30 years old. "Nuke" is the verb that we use for a microwave. A microwave maybe came out in 1981; I don't know. I remember in my house getting one in 1983, and I could make popcorn, and it was amazing. So about the 1980s, we had this amazing thing called a "microwave". You probably know what a "microwave" is. But if you don't, it's like a little oven that cooks your food really, really quickly. We actually developed a new word for this. We call it "nuke". So I can say, "I nuke my food." That means, "I put my food in the microwave." Ding, ding, ding! And it's ready to eat. The next thing that we have is an "oven" or a "stove". Now, "oven" and "stove" -- same word. It does not matter if you say "oven" or "stove". Who cares? I don't. An "oven" or a "stove" -- properly, the "stove" is actually a "stove top" where you would put things on top of the stovetop. And the "oven" is actually this part inside where you open the door. Inside the oven part, at the bottom here, you can bake a cake for me. I like cheesecake. If you'd like to bake me a cake, please do send it to me at www.engvid.com. I will be happy to eat it. You can "grill" or "broil". Now, "grill" and "broil" are the same. It just depends on what your oven says. When you "bake" something, the heat comes from the top and the bottom of the oven, and it's distributed throughout. If you "grill" or "broil" something, the heat comes from the top, and it cooks it on the top of the meat or whatever you're cooking. So the "broil" and the "grill" -- the heat comes from the top. And "bake"; the heat comes from the top and the bottom. So depending on what you're cooking would be the setting on what you're going to use on your oven or your stove. When we bake something, we usually have a certain temperature -- 250 degrees, or you can have 400 degrees. One is Fahrenheit, and one is Celsius. Most of them have both, but if you don't know on your recipe, you could always look on the Internet. It's magic. The next thing -- speaking about magic -- is a toaster. This is the most magical machine ever to be invented in your kitchen. Let me explain the magic of the toaster. You take a simple piece of bread. You put it in the toaster; press the button down; you wait. "Bing!" Out comes lovely, warm, crusty toast. This machine, very simply, is called a "toaster". So you put bread into the toaster -- like magic, it becomes "toast". The next appliance we have is a "kettle". Now, if you like to drink tea or coffee, you're going to love to have a kettle. A "kettle" is a machine that boils water. You can have one on your stovetop, or you can also have one that plugs into the wall. I'm not a very good artist -- or am I? But if you can kind of use your imagination, these both are called "kettles"; they're used for boiling water. Do you like coffee? I love coffee. We also have what's called a "coffeemaker". I know. Sometimes, English makes sense. Guess what this makes. Coffee. So you press some buttons -- some magic; water turns into coffee. It's like water into wine but not as nice. Better in the morning, though. The next thing that we have, another big appliance -- these, by the way, are called "appliances" -- is a "refrigerator". We never bother saying "refrigerator". We say "fridge". And on top of the fridge, we have a "freezer". Now, all of it is called a "fridge", but the top part is called a "freezer". A "freezer" is where there's going to be ice, and things in it are going to be frozen. Frozen. So let's say that you have a delicious frozen dinner, and you want to nuke it. You're going to put it in the microwave.
Improve Your Writing - 6 ways to compare
 
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One of the most common types of essays you will have to write at university as well as on the IELTS or TOEFL is a comparison essay. In this lesson, I will teach you some useful words that will help you to compare things. By the end of this video, you will be able to use terms such as "alike", "similar", "in the same way", "likewise", and more. Take my quiz at the end for more experience using these words. http://www.engvid.com/writing-6-ways-to-compare/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some key words you can use when you talk about how things are the same or similar. Okay? So when you compare two things -- when you're comparing apples and oranges, there are some similarities. They're both fruits. When you're comparing shopping to skiing, when you're comparing a city to a country or the countryside -- there is a certain language we like to use when we're saying how these things are similar or the same. In this video, I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions you can use when comparing two things to show their similarities. Okay? So this video is called "Talking about similarities". So for this video, I decided I wanted to do a theme. I wanted to look at how Canada and England are similar. In what ways are they very much alike? Okay? So each of my sentences are going to have to do with Canada and England, and we're going to look at how they're alike using these comparison words. So for those of you watching, if you are doing the TOEFL, these words are essential. If you are doing the IELTS -- very important vocabulary here. General English, you can use these at university for essays, college, or even just general conversation. So let's get started. Okay. So how are Canada and England the same? Well, I would say, first of all, both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have Queen Elizabeth. So one word we often use when we're talking about similarities is this word, "both". Both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have trees. Both Canada and England have cities. Okay? So there are a lot of different things you can compare. This is just one of them. Now, I want to say why I wrote the word "beginning" here. "Both" often comes at the beginning of a sentence. And notice how the construction is. We have both A and B. Another example, "Both cats and dogs are animals." "Both hamsters and mice are rodents." Okay? So we use this a lot when we're comparing. We can also say "like". In this case, we're not saying, "I like Canada" or "I like" -- you know, showing preference -- we're again showing similarity. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." Canada has many immigrants. England has many immigrants. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." And again, you'll notice "like" is at the beginning of the sentence. It's often -- not always, but often -- at the beginning. We have it followed by a noun. I could change this to something else. Imagine if I wanted to compare cats and dogs. "Like cats, dogs have fur." Okay? I could say that. If I'm comparing men and women, "Like women, men are human." Okay? It's not the greatest of comparisons, but you can use these types of words when you're comparing. Okay? So now, I have some other things I want to compare. In England, they speak English. In Canada, we also speak English. Not everybody, but many Canadians speak English. Some speak French, but a lot of people speak English. So I'm going to teach you some words you can use when comparing these two sentences. "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English, too. In comparison, in Canada many people also speak English. In the same way, in Canada many people speak English." And finally, another way similar to this but slightly different, "Likewise, in Canada many people speak English." So these are a little bit different from these ones. They all mean how they are the same. But you'll notice one of the differences here is these are followed by a comma. "Likewise, comma." And then, we have the rest of the sentence. These go at the beginning of the sentence. Okay? In case you can't tell, this is a period. So we have our first sentence, "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English." Okay? So you can use these in your writing. They would really, really help on your TOEFL, IELTS, or university essays to help you get a better mark.
Language Art Games for Primary School : Teaching Language Arts & More
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehow Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehow Language arts games for primary school are a great way to introduce kids to topics that may seem more advanced. Find out about language arts games for primary school with help from an education director at Aspen Learning in this free video clip. Expert: Tenley Hardin Contact: limitlessheart.com/ Bio: Tenley Hardin has a Bachelor of Theatre Arts from the University of Michigan (2001) and a Master of Arts in English from Belmont University (2005). Filmmaker: Nicholas Wilson Series Description: Language arts is very important for elementary school kids, high school kids and everyone in between. Learn about language arts and teaching with help from an education director at Aspen Learning in this free video series.
Views: 287459 eHow
Speaking English - Classroom vocabulary and expressions
 
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http://www.engvid.com May I go to the bathroom? May I be excused? Were you absent? Learn basic classroom English from a native speaker! You'll learn the difference between an exam and a test, as well as lots of common and important vocabulary and expressions. Then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/classroom-vocabulary !
In The Bedroom | Basic Vocabulary Practice | ESL | EFL
 
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Hello Everyone! This video is designed for students, teachers and anyone wanting to learn English. My videos are vocabulary-based for conversation practice. Each video is themed to provide context for learning. To insure success, every video is designed with open slots for vocabulary substitution practice. These patterns allow students to practice on their own and teachers can have their class practice together as a group. These videos also work great for icebreakers and class discussions. Please have fun and speak English now! Thank you for your kind support :) Mark Kulek Here is my eBook for 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume One. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MT6OZ54 and 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume Two: For those of you who are interested in teaching English to young learners. Please have a look at my blog, Sharing My Whiteboard. http://sharingmywhiteboard.blogspot.jp Thank you for your time.
Views: 99711 Mark Kulek
Learn German | German Grammar | Rules for articles | Hints on how to guess the german articles | A1
 
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#LearnGermanOriginal #LearnGerman #GermanGrammar Learn German lessons online for beginners course - We help you learn german in a quick and easy way. Learn German Grammar - You will learn how to tell the articles i.e. rules for the articles (der, die, das) in the German language. Awesome hints on how to guess the articles. It is highly recommended to listen and learn the articles and their rules as it is. You can always pause and replay to hear something again. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to write! Watch our Playlists- A1 - https://goo.gl/YuxM9T A2 - https://goo.gl/Q9JKft Grammar - https://goo.gl/J8C1SJ Vocabulary - https://goo.gl/YF3wwt Speaking - https://goo.gl/wcUWo5 Do like our facebook page for more tips and interesting facts about Germany and other German speaking countries : FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/learn.german.language Also visit us here: TWITTER: https://twitter.com/learnGermanLang INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/learn.german.language/ GOOGLE+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/104938630697375657922/104938630697375657922 Learn German online for free with easy to understand lessons on our channel "Learn German". YOUTUBE: https://goo.gl/EWKjxj Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel on YouTube and start learning German today!
Views: 122022 Learn German
English Vocabulary -- Words for the Kitchen -- American English
 
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Learn English vocabulary for items in the kitchen. Learn lots of new words and how to pronounce them! Other videos: Kitchen phrases: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mk-fZbHnPpM WH words: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyCXAYBi9HU AA followed by nasal consonants: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxGWdoau7vc The Word Little: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMfGNeZEQQo Sign up for Rachel's FREE 10-day mini-course in Accent Reduction and mailing list: http://www.RachelsEnglish.com/newsletter New to Rachel's English? Where to Start Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrqHrGoMJdTRwaQFCCDp4G88yX5D3gOdP Get Rachel's Book: http://RachelsEnglish.com/book SUBSCRIBE!: http://bit.ly/RE_sub, Fan! http://bit.ly/RE_FB Follow! http://www.twitter.com/Rachels_English Improve your American Accent / spoken English at Rachel's English with video-based lessons and exercises. Rachel uses real life English conversation as the basis for teaching how to speak English and how to sound American -- improve listening comprehension skills. Study English vocabulary and English phrases such as phrasal verbs, as well as common expressions in English. Learn American idioms and American slang. Cải thiện nói tiếng Anh Mỹ / 改善美式英語的發音 / 미국 영어 발음 향상 / アメリカ英語の話し言葉のアクセントを向上させる / Улучшение произношения американского английского языка / Meningkatkan berbicara bahasa Inggris Amerika / Melhore sua pronúncia do inglês americano / Mejora tu pronunciación en Inglés Americano / बात अमेरिकी अंग्रेजी में सुधार / تحسين لهجتك الأمريكية الإنجليزية / שפר את המבטא האמריקאי שלך ...with Rachel's English! Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/RXdJ/
Views: 1046043 Rachel's English
English Vocabulary: How to talk about the economy
 
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http://www.engvid.com Let's talk business! Today you'll learn vocabulary that will help you to read and speak about the economy. We will look at common words used to discuss economic matters, such as GDP, stagnation, fiscal, and more. These words and expressions will help you read financial news articles and follow economic reports on television and online. After the lesson, take the quiz and try to practice these words by discussing economic matters in English with your co-workers and friends. Feel free to ask me questions in the comments section on engVid. http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-how-to-talk-about-the-economy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson, we're going to look at business English. We're going to talk about the economy. Now, we're not going to get into too much detail. We're not going to get into economic theories, etc. What we're going to look at is some vocabulary that will help you read financial articles and newspapers, or online, or watch financial broadcasts on TV; CNN, Money Matters, etc., things like that. So, we're going to look at all these words. We're going to start with "GDP" because everything somehow relates to "GDP - gross domestic product". What is this? This is the total value, the total monetary value of goods and services produced within a country. So everything that the country produces from toilet paper to airplanes, and services from massage to heart surgery, all the money that's made from these goods and services together adds up to the GDP. So, when we're talking about GDP, we're going to refer back to this expression when we're talking about some of these other words. So, first, let's look at "fiscal". "Fiscal" basically means anything to do with money, anything to do with financial matters, especially when we're talking about taxes. Okay? So, when... The most common thing you'll hear is "fiscal year". So when we're talking about a company's fiscal year, we're talking about it's the beginning of its tax year to the end of its tax year. In some countries, everybody matches this to January to December; in other countries, you're allowed... Your fiscal year starts when you start your business, and then one year later is the end of your fiscal year. It's easier to match it to the calendar year, but... A "quarter". Now, you're going to always hear about prices, and stocks, and values going up or down over the last quarter or over the last two quarters. What is a "quarter"? It's basically three months. So if you're talking about the first quarter of the year, you're talking about January, February, March. That's your first quarter. Your next three months, second quarter. Four quarters makes one year. "Currency". I think everybody knows this word, but just in case, this is the money that is used in a country or a region. This is the monetary value that is used for exchanges, trades, investments, etc. In Canada, we use the Canadian dollar. In the U.S., they use the American dollar. Euro in Europe, etc. A "budget". A "budget" or "to budget", it can be a noun or a verb, means to make a plan on how to spend a certain amount of money. So, for example, a government has this much money that they need to spend, or they have a plan that they want to spend this much money. Now, they want to spend a million dollars. I'm being very simple, here; I'm not going to get into big numbers. They need to spend a million dollars to provide all the services that they need and to buy all the materials that they need to import, etc. If they are running on a deficit, that means that they need to spend more money than they have. They have to spend on things to bring in or to run the country, but they don't have. So if I need to spend a million dollars but I only make the revenues of the country are only $900,000, then they will run on $100,000 deficit. Okay? "Surplus" is the opposite. "Surplus" is when the government or any company, you don't have to apply this to a government, when you have more money than you need for the budget. So if I need to spend a million dollars over the next year, but I have a million and a half, then I have half a million dollar surplus, which is always a good thing. "Inflation/deflation". "Inflation" is when prices of goods and services go up, but wages stay the same. So, basically, the purchase power of the individual goes down. You have the same amount of money, but you can buy fewer things or you can hire fewer people to do to have services for you. "Deflation" is the opposite. That's when prices go down, and the value of your dollar or your currency goes up. Both situations are not good.
SICKNESS vocabulary! Learn English!
 
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Learn English Vocabulary about feeling under the weather / sick / ill / poorly (What's "Poorly"?!) Expressions: 0:15 Nose: 3:00 Throat: 6:10 Head: 7:16 Body: 7:40 Tired: 7:58 Stomach / Tummy: 8:43 High Temperature: 10:01 Medicine: 10:47 __ Get your Papa Badge of Honour, support the channel, AND practice your English with me! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwk6ifONlkvqnoMF2uyA05g/join Papa Teach Me Podcast: www.papateachme.podbean.com FREE STUFF!!! FREE $32 AirBnB Credit: www.airbnb.com/c/awilliams803 FREE First Uber ride invite code: kzik3 FREE Lyft credit code: ALASTAIR89698 Follow me on Social Media: Instagram: @papateachme Twitter: @papateachme Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/papateachme Support the lessons on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/papateachme Business inquiries: [email protected]
Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 846515 Learn English Lab
Learn English vocabulary in the BATHROOM :)
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Is there a difference between a BATHROOM and a WASHROOM? Today's English lesson is all about RESTROOM vocabulary! It has many names, and I bet you visit this place many times every day. Lets make sure you can talk about it properly. Avoid making embarrassing mistakes by learning some very common words. When you're done, wash your hands and take the quiz! EngVid: Don't take a dump without it. http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-bathroom/ TRANSCRIPT "Teacher! Teacher! Ronnie! Ronnie! Can I go -- can I go bathroom?" "What? 'Can I go bathroom?' Okay. 'Can I go to the bathroom?' Yes. 'Can I go bathroom?' No. Not in here, please. If you said, "Can I go bathroom", that means that you are going to pee where you are. Please go to the bathroom or the washroom to pee. Today's lesson is all about going to the toilet. This thing is called a "plunger". Plunge, plunge, plunge! What do you do with this in the bathroom, you wonder? This is a plunger. What we use this for is in the toilet. So let's imagine that your friend, your mother, your father, your brother, your sister, or you ate a lot of food last night. And then, you went to the toilet. You took a massive dump. What is a "massive dump"? A "massive dump" is slang. "Take a massive dump." "Massive" means very big, and "dump" -- let me draw it for you -- means poo. Unchi! Japanese style. So "take a massive dump" means "to have a bowel movement", if you will. Okay? But it's so large that maybe it clogs or plugged the toilet. So that means I cannot flush the toilet. Now, basic bathroom etiquette. Please, when you have finished whatever you're doing in there, please always flush the toilet. There's a little mechanism on the toilet. It's usually a silver color. It's very easy. You press it. All of the water and all of the extra things in the toilet floating here -- maybe you have some poo -- it goes away so that the next person does not have to see what you ate for dinner. I don't want to see that. "Oh, Uncle John had corn last night." Unnecessary for me to see. So please, I beg of you, if you are going to use the toilet, please flush it, okay? There was a rhyme that I knew -- I still know it. It's called, "If it's yellow, let it mellow. If it's brown, flush it down." I would like to change the poem to say, "Flush the toilet. I don't care what color it is. I don't want to see it." Or you're going to be getting one of these stuck in your face. So rule No. 1: Flush the toilet, okay? With a plunger, you are going to -- as I said -- unclog the plugged toilet. What happens in a toilet or in a sink is you have a drain, okay? A "drain" is a hole at the bottom where all the water goes into. It goes to Magic Land. Okay? So the sink and the toilet both have a drain, as does your bathtub and your shower. What happens is hair or other debris gets stuck in the drain. So the drain gets clogged or plugged. It basically means that all of this stuff can't go down the pipe, and it backs up. So the water doesn't go down. Dangerous with a toilet. Not as bad with a sink. Acceptable with a bathtub and a shower. All you need to do is plunge it. Make sure it's clean. Now, what do you do in a sink? Usually, when you go to the sink, you wash your hands. Rule No. 2: After you go to the toilet, you flush the toilet, okay? Then, it's really, really cool. It's the coolest thing ever that you wash your hands. Especially for men. Guys, what are you touching? What are you doing? I don't want to touch a doorknob that you have touched after you've taken -- sorry. After you've gone to the toilet. You've touched your man part. You did not wash your hand, and then you touched the doorknob. I'm touching your knob, too, okay? Literally. I don't want to touch your knob. Please wash your hands after you flush the toilet. Good. Another thing that you might find in a bathroom or a washroom is a bathtub, and/or you may have a shower. Now, the difference between a bathtub and a shower, it's very easy. When you have or take a bath, you're going to do it in the bathtub. In the bathtub, you get to lie down. You get to relax. Maybe you have some bubbles. Maybe you have a rubber ducky. That's a duck, okay? I'm an artist. That's a duck. A shower, it's very small, and you don't have enough room to lie down, so you are going to stand up in the shower, okay? It doesn't matter if you say the verb "take" or "have". So you can say, "I'm going to have a bath. I'm going to take a bath. Or I'm going to have a shower. I'm going to take a shower." The other thing that you can say is -- "shower" is also a verb. So you can say, "I'm going to shower. I'm going to shower." You can't say, "I'm going to bath, or I'm going to bathtub." Because "bathtub" and "bath" -- these guys are only nouns, okay? A shower can be a verb and a noun. English is so confusing sometimes. Even when you're just trying to be clean. I'll help you. Don't worry.
10 Tips To Build Your Vocabulary | Learn More English Words
 
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Mentioned in this video: ➡️ mmmEnglish Imitation lessons: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2/ ➡️ AUDIBLE (Get your first audiobook for FREE!) http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish ➡️ RYPE: Speak with native teachers... As much as you want! https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ What's the best way to learn English vocabulary? How can I learn more words? The truth is, that to successfully learn new vocabulary, you need to create good study habits, keep it interesting and make sure that you are having fun! Building your English vocabulary is something that you should be doing, every day... So, you need to find fun and interesting ways to do it! In this video, I’m going to talk about a number of different tools and techniques that you can use to improve your vocabulary - you might not like all of them, but you will definitely enjoy some of them! And hopefully, you can make them part of your daily or weekly routine. AND if you’ve got your own suggestions about ways to learn vocabulary, make sure you add them in the comments!! Share the love! 10 TIPS FOR LEARNING NEW VOCABULARY! 1. Get better at studying new words! 2. When you do learn new words, don’t learn words on their own! 3. Learn new vocabulary through stories. Stories are FULL of new words, phrases and interesting expressions that show you how words come together in an interesting, fun and engaging way! You’re not only learning what words to use but how to use them! For pre-intermediate/intermediate learners, I recommend: - Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney - Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown - Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher - Charlotte’s Web by E.B.White For upper-intermediate/advanced learners: - James and The Giant Peach by Roald Dahl - The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Animal Farm by George Orwell 4. Listen while you read. You can find the AUDIO books for almost any book you can imagine. Which is great, because HEARING how English words are pronounced is so important I use Audible to download my audio books and listen to them while I’m jogging, travelling or even drifting off to sleep! Choose your first audiobook and TRY IT FOR FREE here: http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish 5. Learn new vocabulary through songs. You can easily find the lyrics to heaps of other English songs at metrolyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/ (If you know some good songs to practice with, post your suggestions in the comments below and share your love of English music!) Lyrics Training is great - lots of fun! https://lyricstraining.com/ Here’s a couple on the mmmEnglish website: The Lazy Song – Bruno Mars https://www.mmmenglish.com/2015/12/16/sing-english-the-lazy-song/ (Sitting On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Reading https://www.mmmenglish.com/2016/01/09/sing-english-sitting-on-the-dock-of-the-bay/ 6. Get Better At Using Online dictionaries! Macmillan Dictionary - http://www.macmillandictionary.com/ Oxford Dictionary - https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/ Cambridge Dictionary - http://dictionary.cambridge.org/ 7. Use labels & flashcards Anki App - https://www.ankiapp.com/ 8. Describe the world around you. 9. Imitate a native speaker. Imitating a native English speaker will help you: - learn new vocabulary and expressions, in context - improve your English pronunciation - sound more natural, like a native English speaker - feel more confident in conversations with native speakers Try the mmmEnglish imitation Lessons! Series 1 (Storytelling) https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation/ Free sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZGf8JY5_ck Series 2 (Describing People) https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2/ Free sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmU_pN0bEn8 10. If you are at an Intermediate English level, speak and practise being in conversations. Cambly: https://www.cambly.com Lingoda: https://www.lingoda.com If you are a busy person trying to learn English, you need to try Rype! Practice at any time, as often as you like… With native teachers! And I can help you to try Rype for TWO WEEKS, FOR FREE! , right here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/07/24/10-tips-to-build-your-vocabulary/ *I recommend* Get Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE! grammarly.com/mmmenglish English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Speak with native teachers... As much as you want! https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ CONTACT mmmEnglish: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish Find me on Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB Find me on Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 914341 mmmEnglish
Introducing question forms to young learners
 
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Ritsuko Nakata, co-author of Let's Go, shares a fun and effective way to introduce new vocabulary to young learners. For more free videos, webinars, articles, sample lessons and advice, visit the Let's Share page at http://oxford.ly/eltshare
Transition Words in English | Linking Words and Phrases | English Writing
 
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Extensive list of Transition Words and Phrases in English with pictures. They can be used at the start of new paragraphs in your essays.  Learn More: https://7esl.com/transition-words/ 1. Transition Words – RESULT Function: To provide the result of what has been stated or has occurred Unlike Nevertheless On the other hand Nonetheless Despite / in spite of In contrast (to) While Whereas Alternatively Conversely Even so Differing from Contrary to 2. Transition Words – COMPARISON Function: To show how things are similar Similarly Equally Likewise Just as Just like Similar to Same as Compare / compare(d) to (with) By the same token In the same way Correspondingly 3. Transition Words – ORDER - Function: To indicate the order of what is being said First/ firstly Second/ secondly Third/ thirdly Finally At this time Following Previously Before Subsequently - Function: To mark the end of an ascending order Above all Lastly and most importantly Last but not least - Definition: To mark the beginning of a descending order First and foremost… 4. Transition Words – SUMMARY Function: To sum up what has been previously stated In conclusion To summarise Altogether In short To sum up In summary Briefly To conclude 5. Linking Words – CONDITION Function: To provide a condition to what has been stated If In that case In case Unless 6. Linking Words – CONCESSION Function: To accept a point or idea with reservation Admittedly All the same Up to a point Even so In spite of Although/Even though Even if However 7. Transition Words – GENERALISATION Function: To make a general statement As a rule For the most part In general/ Generally On the whole Overall In most cases 8. Transition Words – RESTATEMENT Function: To express an alternative to what has been previously stated In other words To put it differently As a result As a consequence (of) Therefore Thus Consequently Hence For this reason Due to 9. Transition Words – EMPHASIS Function: To put forward a point or idea more forcefully Undoubtedly Indeed Obviously Particularly / in particular Especially Clearly Importantly Absolutely Definitely Without a doubt Never It should be noted Unquestionably Above all Positively 10. Transition Words – ADDITION Function: To add to what has been previously stated Additionally / an additional Furthermore Also Too As well as that Along with Besides In addition Moreover Not only…but also In addition to this Apart from this 11. Transition Words – REASON Function: To provide reasons for what has been stated or has occurred Because of With this in mind In fact In order to Due to 12. Transition Words – ILLUSTRATION Function: To provide examples For example/ For instance Such as Including Namely In this case Proof of this Like To demonstrate/ To clarify 13. Linking Words – CONTRAST Function: To show how things are different
Views: 237798 7 E S L
Ideas for using flashcards
 
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Flashcards are an incredibly useful and flexible resource for teaching vocabulary. Carol Read shows some very simple, practical activities that you can use at Primary.
Views: 1015216 Macmillan Spain
Learn English and Improve Vocabulary through Story: Swan lake (level 1)
 
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A beautiful white swan with a gold crown on its head was swimming there. Ozlowe decided to kill the animal for Prince’s pleasure and shot an arrow. Prince Zigfried tried to stop his servant but it was too late... Now watching video to find out what happen!
Dr. Eli Hinkel Teaching and Learning Vocabulary for Academic Writing Colorado State University
 
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Colorado State University, English Department TEFL/TESL Student Association, Advocacy week Spring 2017
Views: 137 Mohamed Almahdi
How to Teach an Inductive Learning Lesson
 
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Learn how to use the Inductive Learning strategy, a way to engage students in higher-level thinking by having them analyze examples before being introduced to overarching theories or rules.
Views: 61902 Cult of Pedagogy
English Grammar Course For Beginners:  Basic English Grammar
 
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Hello here is a great and free English grammar course taught by Esther. Esther is an American teacher from California. It is the best video course for beginner students. Esther teaches English articles, pronouns, prepositions, adjectives, etc. This video is perfect to help you improve your English speaking, listening, writing, and reading. ———————————— Join Us to Support Us! ———————————— https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_OskgZBoS4dAnVUgJVexcw/join 0:00 Beginner English Introduction 0:57 Vowels and Consonants 5:57 a/an + Noun 11:26 Singular / Plural Nouns 20:45 Subjective Pronouns 26:53 Subjective Pronouns + Be 33:44 Subjective Pronouns + Be + Not 38:43 'be' Verb Pronoun Questions 49:54 Review #1 - Subjective Pronouns 53:12 Grammar Check Up #1 58:55 What + Be Verb Questions 1:03:43 This / That 1:07:32 These / Those 1:11:58 This / That / These / Those Practice 1:13:47 Possessive Adjectives 1:21:46 Possessive Pronouns 1:27:04 Grammar Check Up #2 1:34:16 Articles + Noun 1:40:47 Prepositions: in / on / under 1:45:44 Beginner Adjectives 1:50:13 Grammar Check Up #3 1:57:41 Have / Has 2:01:59 Don't / Doesn't Have Questions 2:06:26 Do / Does Have Questions 2:10:42 Grammar Check Up #4 ———————————— Check us out! ———————————— Please support us through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ShawEnglish Website: http://www.shawenglish.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shawenglish/ Learn English With Robin (Facebook Group) https://www.facebook.com/groups/162048911162706/ Learn English With Robin (Whatsapp, Skype, Line, WeChat, KakaoTalk) https://shawenglish.com/skype-online-english-lessons/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shawenglishonline/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglishNow Naver Café (네이버 카페): http://cafe.naver.com/shawenglish ———————————— Message from Robin Shaw ———————————— Hello, I am Robin Shaw. Thank you for watching my videos. I’m a Canadian who lives in Korea, but loves to travel to many countries and meet students. I have been an English teacher for almost 20 years. I love teaching students from around the world. Please help and support this channel by subscribing, commenting, sharing, and clicking ‘like’ on my videos. ———————————— My Other Channel ———————————— If you are interested in Korea, this is my other YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ConnectKoreaMedia Website: http://www.connectkorea.com Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/connectkorea/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/connectkorea/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ConnectKoreaNow
Views: 2545728 Shaw English Online
Learn English - Travel Vocabulary
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Learn important, basic words you will need when you travel. Knowing a little English vocabulary can help a lot when you are travelling. Whever you are going in the world, you can almost always find someone who speaks some English. I'll teach you how a "tourist attraction" is different from a "tourist trap". What about "sight seeing"? Do you know what an "itinerary" is? Do you have your travel documents? Get ready for your English to take flight! http://www.engvid.com/travel-vocabulary/ Hi. James, from EngVid. I was just about to plan my vacation. I'm going to take a long flight to Europe. I'm trying to remember luggage and baggage things, you know? It's kind of hard to do. But this is a lesson for you if you've been working a lot, you need some time off. Now, there's a video I would like you to go check out. That's on time off. It goes with this one. You might want to go away somewhere and not just stay home, right? So this video is for you. This is basic vocabulary on vacation. When you leave and maybe you go to an English speaking country and you want to practice your English, this stuff will be good for you to enjoy your time there, also to make it easy for you when you arrive. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. Mr. E, Mr. E! It's a mystery where he is. It's no mystery. And you thought I forgot. Mr. E has been on vacation with me, and he's enjoying this particular attraction. So let's go to the board. Now, if you're going to go on vacation, one of the first things you will have to do if you're leaving your country is you're going to need some travel documents. What are those? Documents. A "document" is a paper or something with information that tells you something is okay or outlines it for you. For example, your passport is a document given by the government with your picture on it that says you are a citizen of this country, and you are legal. You are a good person. Okay? Now, when you're leaving for a flight, or you want to go to another country, you're going to need travel documents first. Trust me; show up at the airport and go, "I leave now. I go to Canada." They will go, "And the car is that way. Go home, crazy man. Okay?" So we need travel documents. So what are "travel documents"? Well, "travel documents" would be your passport, government identification, usually needed at most places the travel. Inside of a country, not necessary for most places. But leaving the country, you have to have it. Okay? So if you're in the European Union, no problem. If you're in Canada and the United States, you don't need one. But as soon as you leave these countries, you need a passport. What's another thing you need? Well, you need what's called a "boarding pass". If you play soccer, you kick the ball; the other guy, he catches it; you "pass" right? The ball goes from one player to another. A "boarding pass" is what allows you to go from one country to another country. You show the person on the airplane this piece of paper with your passport, and they say, "You know what? You can come on the plane and fly, like the pass." Kick, catch, other country. Cool? All right. So these are your travel documents. You need those. Now, I should have started with you need to make a plan because you want to go visit some place. You want to go on vacation, right? And if you want to go on vacation, well, going to have to -- I said "vacation". A "vacation" is a holiday, another word for saying "time off from work". All right? So you want to go on vacation. Sometimes, we say, "We're going to vacation in Italy." Or "on my vacation, I want to visit Italy." Or "I'm taking a holiday in Italy." Okay? So all these words, when people say, "Well, what are you doing on your time off?" You might go, "I'm going on vacation." Then they know you're leaving. If you just say, "I'm taking time off from work", you could be home cleaning. But no. You're saying, "I'm going on vacation." They're going to go, "Where are you going to visit? Italy, perhaps? Sicily? Is it going to be a good holiday?" And you go, "Yes. I earned my time." "Earned" means to work for something. "I earned my time off. I'm going on vacation."
Clothes Vocabulary in French Part 1 (basic French vocabulary from Learn French With Alexa)
 
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Alexa Polidoro, from https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com, teaches you some basic French vocabulary: clothes in French (part 1). SUBSCRIBE ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA PLAYLIST ► http://learnfren.ch/vocabLFWA ---------------------------------------------- TAKE YOUR FRENCH TO THE NEXT LEVEL My Website ► http://learnfrenchwithalexa.com Test Yourself ► https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com Support me on Patreon ► https://patreon.com/french ---------------------------------------------- GET SOCIAL WITH ALEXA AND HER STUDENTS YouTube ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA Facebook ► http://learnfren.ch/faceLFWA Twitter ► http://learnfren.ch/twitLFWA Pinterest ► http://learnfren.ch/pinterestLFWA Instagram ► http://learnfren.ch/instagramLFWA Newsletter ► http://learnfren.ch/newsletterLFWA Google+ ► http://learnfren.ch/plusLFWA ---------------------------------------------- LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA T-SHIRTS T-Shirts ► http://learnfren.ch/tshirtsLFWA ---------------------------------------------- MORE ABOUT LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA'S 'HOW TO SPEAK' FRENCH VIDEO LESSONS Alexa Polidoro a real French teacher with many years' experience of teaching French to adults and children at all levels. People from all over the world enjoy learning how to speak French with Alexa's popular online video and audio French lessons. They're fun, friendly and stress-free! It's like she's actually sitting there with you, helping you along... Your very own personal French tutor. New videos every week! Please Like, Share, and Subscribe if you enjoyed this video. Merci et Bisou Bisou xx SUBSCRIBE HERE ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA for more great FREE videos.
Views: 155174 Learn French With Alexa
Vocabulary Development | For Everyone - by Sandeep Manudhane sir
 
02:21:01
1. A whole range of awesome online courses, here : https://Gurukul.PTeducation.com 2. Free learning for Vocab - PT Boosters - here : http://Boosters.PTeducation.com 3. BODHI BOOSTER Knowledge Portal - http://www.BodhiBooster.com 4. AMAZING QUESTION-ANSWERS - http://www.PTeducation.com/topicwise 5. UPSC Self Prep Course - http://www.PTeducation.com/upsc.aspx 6. PREMIUM knowledge solution - http://www.BodhiBooster.com/p/bodhiboosterpremium.html 7. MOTIVATIONAL tips - http://Achieve.SandeepManudhane.org 8. UPSC EXAM ANALYSES - http://ias.pteducation.com/UPSCexamAnalyses.aspx 9. MBA EXAM ANALYSES - http://www.pteducation.com/MBAtestanalyses/ All the best!
Views: 3487470 PT education HQ
Speaking English - Bad Habits
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you bite your nails? That's a bad habit! Watch this lesson to learn vocabulary and expressions to talk about bad habits in English. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/bad-habits/
Adjectives for Kids | Language Arts Video Lesson
 
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Learn about adjectives in this language arts lesson for kids. There is also a fun kids quiz at the end of the adjectives video, so be sure and pay attention so you are able to get them right! ❤ Homeschool Pop? Join our team and get tattoos here: http://homeschoolpop.com Special thanks to Kanchan Singh for the idea of this adjectives video! Thanks for watching this Homeschool Pop video! Be sure and subscribe for more videos, comment and let us know what you think, and join Team Pop! Adjectives for Kids | Language Arts Video Lesson Adjectives Adjectives for kids language arts video lesson language arts adjectives first grade adjectives second grade adjectives school house rock adjectives song
Views: 279819 Homeschool Pop
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
English - Vocabulary Words - Final Blends - Grades 1, 2 and 3 - Teaching Resources - Homeschooling
 
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Read each word twice to improve your reading and vocabulary. Have fun! Watch the video more than once to become a fluent reader.
Views: 7577 SparklesOnlineSchool
Pronounce English words correctly | Word Stress | Syllables | Pronunciation
 
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Speak English clearly and be understood! Word stress (or syllable stress) is important because syllables in English words are not all equal! This video lesson will show you how to recognise and practice word stress (or syllable stress) correctly. Emma x Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/03/15/word-stress/ Get Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE! https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SHp9 English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Improve your English pronunciation and speaking skills by practicing with the mmmEnglish Imitation Technique! (SERIES 1) Storytelling: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation/ (SERIES 2) Describing people's personality and behaviour: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2 CONTACT mmmEnglish: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish Find me on Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB Find me on Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish
Views: 644609 mmmEnglish
How to use Mind Maps to understand and remember what you read!
 
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Do you have a hard time remembering what you read? Do you need to read things many times before you understand? Reading books can be discouraging because of the large amount of information on each page. To help you make sense of all that information, I will show you how to create a mind map. A mind map is a graphic that shows categories containing quick reference points from your book. By taking short notes and organizing them in a specific way, you will have all the information you need to quickly and easily remember the important points of a book. Just the process of thinking about and creating this mind map will help your brain to understand and remember the material. Try it! It really works and it is free. Mind maps are especially useful when it's time to write an assignment or study for an exam! Watch the video to learn how to create your own mind map. Watch my first mind map lesson: https://www.engvid.com/mind-maps-how-to-learn-vocabulary/ Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-use-mind-maps-to-understand-and-remember-what-you-read/ TRANSCRIPT How to submit. We want to hear from all artists and makers who have a passion for creating. That's cool. Hi. James from engVid. You notice? I was reading. It's not a special skill. Most of us learn it, but the problem is when you go to another language it's difficult sometimes to understand what's on the paper and be able to use that. So today's lesson is about mind maps. Mind maps? Yeah. Wait a second, mind maps and reading. I did a general lesson earlier on. Somewhere in the link you can look down and you can find it, go back, you can watch it. But in that lesson I didn't give any specific examples on mind maps. I'm doing this particular lesson to address that. So, if you're here going: "Yeah, I want to learn about mind maps and reading", this is your lesson. Hold on two seconds. We're going to discuss what the benefits are, what the benefits of reading are, then I'm going to give you a very detailed mind map explaining what parts you should do for what, and that'll help you with reading. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. All right, E, what's up? "It's all Greek to me." Omega, it's not the best symbol, you probably can't see it, but Greek. In English we say when something's Greek to me, it means we don't understand it. A lot of times you'll get a big contract when, you know, you have your cellphone and there's a bill and it's: "Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah", and you're like: "I don't understand it. It's all Greek." I know you understand all of the words, it's just they're put together in such a way it's difficult, and that doesn't matter if you're reading your own language or another language. But there are a lot of benefits when you're learning another language that reading gives you. And a lot of people want to talk and listen, but reading has some power. And let's address that now. Okay? So mind maps are reading comprehension. Don't worry if you haven't seen the mind map, it's coming up in a second or two. But the first thing I want to talk to you about is reading helps you understand the way that the language is put together. Most of you will come and... You come to engVid to learn vocabulary and grammar, but that doesn't help you with syntax, that doesn't help you with putting the words together in a logical way. Reading does that because... Well, let's face facts, when you're reading someone is actually speaking to you but they're not in front of you. So the problem is if they're not very clear and they don't use the language well, you won't really understand them. Right? So reading teaches you how to... The language is put together, where the verbs go, and when's a better place to use the verb or a noun, and how you can show expressions. Okay? Reading also teaches you how to speak by showing you the way that the language is used by the native speakers. Huh? Well, if it's a fiction book they actually say: "-'Johnny, are you coming?' -'Yes.' Dah, dah, dah, dah", and they show you how we use the language. So not only do you understand how to put the language together by looking at it and going: "Ah, comma here, period here", but then they say: "Hey, this is how we speak." So if you follow this you can actually use that kind of method or sys-... Not system. You can follow those words and actually speak like we do. All right?
Body Vocabulary in French Part 1 (basic French vocabulary from Learn French With Alexa)
 
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Alexa teaches you some basic French vocabulary: parts of the body in French (part 1). SUPPORT GUIDE and EXCLUSIVE VIDS at ► https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com ---------------------------------------------- TAKE YOUR FRENCH TO THE NEXT LEVEL My Website ► https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com Support me on Patreon ► https://patreon.com/french ---------------------------------------------- TEST YOURSELF WITH OUR PARTNER KWIZIQ Quick test on French Definite Articles ► https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com/kwiz/take/542699 ---------------------------------------------- USEFUL PLAYLISTS French Vocabulary ► http://learnfren.ch/vocabLFWA ---------------------------------------------- GET SOCIAL WITH ALEXA AND HER STUDENTS My Blog ► https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com/blog YouTube ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA Facebook ► http://learnfren.ch/faceLFWA Twitter ► http://learnfren.ch/twitLFWA LinkedIn ► http://learnfren.ch/linkedinLFWA Newsletter ► http://learnfren.ch/newsletterLFWA Google+ ► http://learnfren.ch/plusLFWA My Soundcloud ► https://soundcloud.com/learnfrenchwithalexa ---------------------------------------------- LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA T-SHIRTS T-Shirts ► http://learnfren.ch/tshirtsLFWA ---------------------------------------------- MORE ABOUT LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA'S 'HOW TO SPEAK' FRENCH VIDEO LESSONS Alexa Polidoro a real French teacher with many years' experience of teaching French to adults and children at all levels. People from all over the world enjoy learning how to speak French with Alexa's popular online video and audio French lessons. They're fun, friendly and stress-free! It's like she's actually sitting there with you, helping you along... Your very own personal French tutor. Please Like, Share and Subscribe if you enjoyed this video. Merci et Bisou Bisou xx ---------------------------------------------- Ready to take your French to the next level? Visit ► https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com to try out Alexa's popular French courses.
Views: 411888 Learn French With Alexa
Rooms of the House in French (basic French vocabulary from Learn French With Alexa)
 
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Alexa Polidoro, from https://learnfrenchwithalexa.com, teaches you some basic French vocabulary: rooms in the house in French (part 1). SUBSCRIBE ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA PLAYLIST ► http://learnfren.ch/vocabLFWA ---------------------------------------------- TAKE YOUR FRENCH TO THE NEXT LEVEL My Website ► http://learnfrenchwithalexa.com Test Yourself ► https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com Support me on Patreon ► https://patreon.com/french ---------------------------------------------- GET SOCIAL WITH ALEXA AND HER STUDENTS YouTube ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA Facebook ► http://learnfren.ch/faceLFWA Twitter ► http://learnfren.ch/twitLFWA Pinterest ► http://learnfren.ch/pinterestLFWA Instagram ► http://learnfren.ch/instagramLFWA Newsletter ► http://learnfren.ch/newsletterLFWA Google+ ► http://learnfren.ch/plusLFWA ---------------------------------------------- LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA T-SHIRTS T-Shirts ► http://learnfren.ch/tshirtsLFWA ---------------------------------------------- MORE ABOUT LEARN FRENCH WITH ALEXA'S 'HOW TO SPEAK' FRENCH VIDEO LESSONS Alexa Polidoro a real French teacher with many years' experience of teaching French to adults and children at all levels. People from all over the world enjoy learning how to speak French with Alexa's popular online video and audio French lessons. They're fun, friendly and stress-free! It's like she's actually sitting there with you, helping you along... Your very own personal French tutor. New videos every week! Please Like, Share, and Subscribe if you enjoyed this video. Merci et Bisou Bisou xx SUBSCRIBE HERE ► http://learnfren.ch/YouTubeLFWA for more great FREE videos.
Improve your conversation skills with WH questions
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Where did you go? Who did you go with? Learn how to keep a conversation going by using who, what, when, where, why, and how! Now why don't you take the quiz? http://www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-wh-questions/
OLD SCHOOL Vocabulary...too formal!
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ I exited the building = very strange English! I shall teach you = very old-fashioned English! I joined the BBQ = WHAT??? Exit, shall, and join are all old words, and are considered too formal nowadays! Learn how to use more natural words and expressions! Don't forget to take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/old-school-vocabulary/ TRANSCRIPT Hello, and welcome to my lesson. I hope you are happy. What? What's going on? Today, I'm going to teach you some words that you will say in English. They are definitely English words. You will use the words correctly in a beautiful, grammatically correct sentence, but they make me go, "What? That's weird. That's weird. "You speak like a grandmother or a grandfather." This lesson is called "Olde School" or -- uh-oh! "Too formal! What are you doing?" So one of the goals that I've always had since I started teaching ESL, or teaching English, is that textbook English and the way that a lot of people teach you how to speak... it's not "cool". You sound like you are reading a textbook. One of my goals in life is to make everyone that I teach sound natural, normal, and not like an old person even if you are an old person. That's cool. I want you to learn words that I and other normal -- normal? Not normal -- and natural English speakers would use. So "Olde School". "Ronnie, you've spelled "old school" wrong." Guess what? A long time ago, this is how they spelled "old", but they didn't say "oldie", they said "old". "Olde school" "Olde school" means it's old. So let's look at the first one: "Telephone". We never, ever, ever, ever, ever say "telephone"; we say "phone" or "mobile" or "cell". "Telephone" is really, really, really old. Do you remember the really old telephones that you had to dial -- you stick your finger and you go [makes clicking sounds]? And if you made a mistake, you had to start again. I remember being a little Ronnie, and I had to dial my best friend's number, and it had three nines in it. [Shudders] "I made a mistake." So "telephone" -- old. Now we have these wonderful cell phones. You press a button, and your friend is right there -- "Hi", okay? Don't use the word "telephone"; it's strange. The other one is: "Television". Do you have a television? I don't. I hate television. So much so that I don't even call it that; I call it a TV. Please call it a "TV", not a "television". "Television" is old, very old. This word: "refrigerator" -- "Ronnie, there's a space here." Yeah. Ronnie has trouble spelling. And the reason why I have trouble spelling this word is we never, ever, ever say this word: "refrigerator". I'm tired by the time I get to this space here, so instead of saying "refrigerator", do you know what we say? "I'm hungry. I'm going to go to the fridge." and get a Coke or a drink. So normally, we shorten this, and we call it a "fridge", "fridge". "Automobile", "auto". If you speak any of the Latin languages, you can understand "auto" means "self"; "mobile" means "move". "Look at me. I'm going in my self-move to the -- to the mall. Would you like a drive?" "No. I'll take the bus, thank you." So "automobile" and "auto", we do not use. We call it one of these [makes car noise] a "car". I have seen a textbook -- one or two in my day -- and it actually says "automobile". So I looked at the date: "Published 2010." Really? You put "automobile" in a textbook? Give your head a shake. The next one is a modal verb. If you do not know what a modal verb is, go look in a grammar book. "Shall" is a modal verb. However, we never use this. The only time you will see this modal verb used is if you are reading rules of something. If you go to a public swimming pool, or if you go on the subway, all of the rules are written with this word. "You shall not spit in the pool. You shall not -- in the pool." Okay, I'm not going to do that. "You shall not run around the pool because you're going to die." "Shall" -- we always use "will" or negative "won't". This has... replaced our modal verb "shall". Please don't say this; it's weird. "You shall give me a dollar." What? "You will give me a dollar." "You're going to give me a dollar." Everyone give me a dollar. The next one is an expression: "What a pity" or "What a shame!" Now, if you were -- let's see -- maybe a 70-year-old grandmother or grandfather living in England, you would say this all the time. My grandmother -- God rest her soul -- would say this, "What a pity. What a shame." She's from Scotland. She says this all the time, "What a pity. What a shame." We go, "That sucks." Okay? If something is bad, you can -- you can say that. You can say, "Wow. That sucks." or "That blows." Don't say this. You can even say, "That's bad." "What a pity" or "What a shame" -- it's way, way too old. Too old. Too old. Bye-bye. "Pardon me!" Pardon me; I forgot the "S". "Pardon me" -- again, my grandmother says this all the time. Pardon me -- we say now: "Excuse me."
Learn how to say numbers in Spanish
 
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Spanish for Beginners - I will teach you to count from 1 to 99 in Spanish. Learn the numbers in Spanish to talk about money, phone number, time, to count to buy, to ask "How much is it?", and so on. Use this vocabulary lesson to improve your Spanish, and to start speaking Spanish NOW! Watch the next part of this video, BIG numbers in Spanish, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awswL1EMRoc&list=PLkjyx6Il3YUYVjL1AMeQXcG-U1hZm08AR I forgot the 0, cero. Sorry I was birding, estaba pajareando, como decimos en español, I was looking at the birds, I was distracted. Do not be so upset. it happens. Anyway, I do not think about zero because that is like seeing that the glass is empty and i think it is full. See, it´s all about perspective. Please donate so I can make more videos about more topics: You can donate at: https://www.butterflyspanish.com/ Or through PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/ButterflySpanish Remember to check my website and subscribe to my free Spanish learning newsletter at: https://www.butterflyspanish.com/ DOUBLE AND TRIPLE NEGATIVES IN SPANISH: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=dmcLNMYxMFI TO BRING: THE VERB LLEVAR AND TRAER IN SPANISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4cLOkuCA2k MUY OR MUCHO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2LsZFTz0ME ORDERING FOOD FROM A FOODTRUCK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5IVtVjT79I 15 WAYS TO SAY NO IN SPANISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwyhqLAknf4 WHAT'S UP IN SPANISH. IS IT Qué pasó or qué pasa? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REfVPiP-4Zs THE LETTER "H" IN SPANISH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slBYkmqn7qs THE ALPHABET IN SPANISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsLYD1Jyf3A Are you happy you are learning Spanish? Good! You should be happy. You will learn. Do not give up! Saludos, Ana Butter Fly Spa, desde el planeta Tierra, on her way to planet Jupiter. Pásenla bien compañeros, ñeros.
Views: 2387519 Butterfly Spanish
Learn Italian for Travel. Review: Important words and phrases for travel (Lesson 17)
 
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Review things previously taught in previous videos, as well as learn a few new important phrases and concepts. Danielle DiPietro-Hawkins has a Masters degree in Teaching International Languages and has been teaching Italian in college for the the past 17 years.
How to use COLLOCATIONS (GREAT Explanation !)
 
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A good way to learn a language is by learning words in groups. In this lesson Marc will explain the different types of collocations in the English Language by giving easy examples. This lesson is for elementary students who wish to study or review English grammar and vocabulary, and for students who reached an advanced level, but who wish to brush up on some grammar rules. English Conversation Lessons - #Corsi di #inglese a #Roma, Termini Marc has been a teacher for over 18 years teaching #English to professionals in Toronto, Canada, and since 1997 in Rome. He has a BA in Modern Languages from the University of Toronto . He is a certified English teacher specialised in EFL, ESL, TOEFL, #IELTS, KET, PET, CAE, FCE, and CPE. His studio is located in downtown #Rome, where he teaches full-time to classes of five students each. He also teaches online to #businessman and students wishing to hold English #examinations.
Views: 121634 Englishing
MY TOP TIPS! Learn & Use More Phrasal Verbs | English Lesson
 
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Check your grammar with the Grammarly grammar checker: https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish WHY are PHRASAL VERBS so DIFFICULT to learn? - Because there are so many of them? - Because they are so commonly used that they can be overwhelming. - Because one phrasal verb can have multiple meanings - Many phrasal verbs are idiomatic, so their meaning is not always as the individual words suggest. In this lesson, I'll share 6 tips to help you learn and use more phrasal verbs, including: - What exactly is a Phrasal Verb? - Is it transitive or intransitive? - Is it separable or inseparable? - They're just multi-word verbs - HOW TO find the right phrasal verbs to practice - Practice USING phrasal verbs... The right way! Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/11/01/6-tips-learn-use-more-phrasal-verbs/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=8-ktHXX0BkI&ref=share Your name will be featured underneath the video 😃 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 351251 mmmEnglish
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
IELTS Reading: Read faster & remember more
 
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On the IELTS Reading section, you have 60 minutes to read 3 different text passages (2200–3000 words) and answer 40 questions! That's CRAZY!!! To do well on the IELTS Reading, whether General or Academic, you NEED to be able to read quickly, and you NEED to be able to quickly identify important information. In this video, I'll share with you some of my tips on speed reading and also some tricks on how to quickly find the most important details in a paragraph. Your road to BAND 9 starts here! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/ielts-reading-read-faster-remember-more WATCH MORE IELTS READING VIDEOS: 1. IELTS READING OVERVIEW: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=As4e8dtqBrk 2. IELTS READING: HOW TO SUCCEED: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbDliT5EN-w 3. IELTS READING: 3 STRATEGIES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0ePX99GM70 4. IELTS READING: TRUE, FALSE, NOT GIVEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNyLs7YWFL8 5. IELTS READING: TOP 10 TIPS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PDgVEhfKso TRANSCRIPT Oh, what a great book. Thank you, Jessica Whitehead. Are you doing an IELTS exam or will you be doing an IELTS exam in the future? Special shoutout to Pedro, thank you for helping me on this, and rock your exam. You're going to do it, boy. If you're studying IELTS, there's one section in the test that is difficult. They're all difficult, but it's the reading section. So, when you're doing your test, you have to read the passage quickly, you have to get all of the wonderful information, and then you have to answer the questions. So, what I want to help you do is something really cool called speed reading. When I was in grade 2, my teacher taught me something that was amazing. Usually when you read something, you take your little finger and you read along like this. So my teacher taught me at the young age of eight to get a bookmark, and instead of reading each word, you're going to read one whole sentence with an eyescape. So, instead of reading word by word with your little finger, you're going to put a bookmark on the sentence and you're going to focus on the sentence. This allows you to read something much faster. So, put your little finger away and grab a bookmark or a piece of paper. So, number six is: Use a bookmark. It helps you absorb the information faster. Another thing that you can do or not do is when you're reading: "The pizza was a wide pizza with ham and pineapple. It was the most exiting flavours, it was..." Don't read out loud. Two reasons: One, there're other people around you that you're probably disturbing, and there's probably been a scientific study that if you move your lips, you're doing extra work and you're kind of wasting time. Try and close your mouth. Don't: "Ra-ra-ra-ra" under your breath, don't move your lips. Just absorb it and read it. This helps you go through it faster and ultimately get that high score that you've all been looking for. Another tip is to pay attention to important key words. So, these are going to be things like dates and times, numbers, and proper nouns. So, please tell me you know what a proper noun is. A proper noun is a place or a person. It starts with a capital letter. So, one really, really good thing you can do is you can take your little highlighter and circle the important words. When you come back to the reading section or when you've read it, it sticks in your brain more. This is good for practicing, too. Some articles and some things have special punctuation. So, dashes. Dashes are a little line here and a little line at the end. There's a very, very good reason why they've used dashes, and that is they're telling you that this information is really important. It's giving you something extra or something that changes the idea about the sentence. So, the information between dashes or even between commas is put there for a reason, and it's probably got some wealth of information, maybe the answer to question number seven. Some readings that you have not necessarily on IELTS, but a newspaper if you're reading something for fun... Do people read for...? Yeah, they do read for fun, Ronnie. Okay. Is a special font. So, if the words are bold which means they're bigger; or if they're written in italics which means, like, handwriting; or if the words are underlined - this is going to give you some really strong information that it's important because they made it like this. When you first begin your IELTS test in the reading section, always read the questions first, then you'll know what information you're looking for. If you just read it willy-nilly without thinking about the questions, you've wasted a lot of time. So read the questions first, then go back and get the information that you need. And about paragraphs, this is a tricky thing that they do. I want you to read the first sentence, it's called the topic sentence. The topic sentence has... We'll say "the meat" or the importance of the paragraph. […]
Vocabulary: How to talk about ADVANTAGES and DISADVANTAGES
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ In English, we often need to talk about the advantages and disadvantages of something. You will definitely need to do this at work, on tests such as the IELTS and TOEFL, and also in everyday conversation. In this lesson, you will learn words that have the same meaning as "advantage" and "disadvantage", such as "drawback", "downside", "positive aspect", "benefit", and many more. After watching, take our quiz to make sure you understood. There are many advantages to watching this video! Come and improve your vocabulary by learning these synonyms in a very short time. http://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-advantages-disadvantages/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some new words. I'm going to teach you some words that mean "good" or "advantage" and some words that mean "bad" or "disadvantage". Now, these words are very, very important if you are planning on writing the TOEFL test, the IELTS test, if you plan to go to university or college, or just for general conversation. Okay? So it's very important you learn multiple ways to talk about advantages and disadvantages. Okay. So let's get started. First of all, I would like to teach you some synonyms of the word "advantage". Okay? And maybe, we can work on your pronunciation. You can repeat after me as I say each word. So my first word here is "advantage", which most of you probably know. It means -- similar to "good". "An advantage of living in Toronto is you get to meet people from all over the word." Okay? So it's a good thing. Similarly, a "benefit" is another good thing. It has the same meaning as the word "advantage". "A benefit of living in Toronto is you get to eat food from all over the word." Another word we could say is "is positive aspect". "A positive aspect of living in Toronto is you get to visit the CN tower, which is a very interesting building." "A good point about living in Toronto is we have a great transportation system." For those of you who live in Toronto, you might think of that as a joke. Okay. "An argument in favor of living in Toronto is the people here are very polite and friendly." Okay? So these are all considered good things about living in Toronto. We can use all of these words to describe the things we love about Toronto. Okay? So I want you to take a moment to think about your city or your village or your town. What could you say that's about it about where you live? Can you think of an advantage, a benefit, a positive aspect, a good point, an argument in favor of where you live? Okay? So now, let's look at some of the bad things, the disadvantages. Okay? So the first word we'll use is "disadvantage". Let's think about living in a city in general. "A disadvantage of living in a city is -- maybe it's very busy." Maybe it's very noisy. Okay? So these are problems with living in a city. "A drawback of living in a city" -- again, you could say it's crowded. There's too much pollution. These are drawbacks. Some people have an objection to living in a city. Maybe there's not enough green space; there's not enough environment living in a city. "A negative effect of living in a city is -- maybe you feel stressed out." Maybe you have a lot of stress because of all the noise. "A downside of living in a city is -- maybe, you know, you're not getting fresh air because of the pollution." "A frequent criticism of living in a city is, again -- maybe it takes a very long time to get anywhere if you live in a very big city." Maybe there's a bad transportation system. So this might be a frequent criticism. Now, for this word specifically, I really want to work on the pronunciation because of this "ism". I know a lot of students from Brazil, a lot of students from South America, Central America, and Europe pronounce this a little bit differently than we do in English. So we would say "criticism". Okay. Can you say that? "Criticism". Okay? So this actually almost becomes like "izum". Okay? So that would be a frequent criticism. Finally, we can also talk about "an argument against". "An argument against living in the city is -- maybe you can't have farm animals." Maybe you love chickens and hens and pigs, but in the city, you can't have them. Okay? So these are all disadvantages of living in a city or disadvantage words. Whereas these are all advantage words. Okay. So let's do a couple of practices with you. I want you to fill in this blank spot with one of these words. Okay? So let's start with positive. So I want you to say this out loud. So pick one of these. "Blank -- of living in a city is it's exciting." "A good point of living in a city is it's exciting." "A benefit of living in a city is it's exciting." Okay?
High School Literature Analysis
 
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High school literature lesson on article analysis. Students analyze author tone and word choice across 5 articles on the same subject. Aligned to MA Curriculum Frameworks Standards: RI.9-10.1 (cite textual evidence); RI.9-10.4 (analyze the cumulative impact of word choices on meaning and tone); RI.9-10.6 (determine an author’s point of view); and RI.9-10.7 (analyze various accounts of a subject).
Views: 38544 Massachusetts DESE

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