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Hydrogen Bonding and Common Mistakes
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Hydrogen bonding can be so confusing, and in this video we talk about some common mistakes. Hydrogen bonds are intermolecular forces between molecules. They form because one atom has a high electronegativity, so it gets a partial negative charge, and the hydrogen gets a partial positive charge.
Views: 528444 Tyler DeWitt
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 70584 Whats Up Dude
Hydrogen Bonds In Water Explained - Intermolecular Forces
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding occurs in molecules when hydrogen is attached to highly electronegative small atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine. Hydrogen bonds are very strong dipole dipole interactions. Molecules that contain hydrogen bonds such as water are very polar. Hydrogen bonds is one of the strongest types of intermolecular forces. This video contains a few examples and illustrations of hydrogen bonds in water and in HF. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 33943 Socratica
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1666751 CrashCourse
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 240427 Professor Dave Explains
Intermolecular Forces and Boiling Points
 
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Why do different liquids boil at different temperatures? It has to do with how strongly the molecules interact with each other. Find out all the different ways, and how to use them to make predictions about matter! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 529528 Professor Dave Explains
Strong versus Weak bonds | Part 3 of Chemical Bonds | Get better grade in exam.
 
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Strong versus Weak bonds | Part 3 of Atomic & Molecular Bonds & Interactions | Get better grade in exam. | Easy learning in just 2 minutes. Illustrated animations. These videos use visual learning technique, which are compilation of knowledge that already exists all over the internet; I compiled all those theories, concepts, definitions, laws, equations, interpretations, etc., so the viewers can save their time watching these. So,……… relax, sit down and watch my videos, learn by heart and go to the exams with your heads high. No worries. chemical bonds, molecular interactions, strong bonds, weak bonds, covalent, non-covalent, ionic, hydrogen-bonding, van der Waals, London Dispersion, polar, non-polar, metallic, atomic orbital, molecular orbital, electron sharing, binding, anti-binding, primary bonds, secondary bonds, electronegativity, dipole moment, Find me on TeacherTube: https://www.teachertube.com/user/channel/anjanasen Many thanks to websites: http://www.audioremover.com/ https://freesound.org/ https://handbrake.fr/
Views: 63 Anjana Sen
Bond Length and Bond Energy
 
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052 - Bond Length and Bond Energy In this video Paul Andersen explains how the bond length and bond energy are calculated using an energy distance graph. The strength of the bond is determined by the charges in the constituent atoms. As the charge increases the bond energy increases and the bond length decreases. Increasing numbers of bonds will also increase the energy and decrease the length. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cdang. Deutsch: Prinzip Des Laue-Verfahrens: Ein Einfallender Monochromatischer Röntgenstrahl Trifft Auf Ein Einkristall, Wird an Diesem in Bestimmte Richtungen Gebeugt Und Erzeugt Auf Der Dahinter Liegenden Fotoplatte Ein Beugungsmuster, March 30, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cliche_de_laue_principe.svg. "File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png. "File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png.
Views: 144432 Bozeman Science
Van der Waals forces | States of matter and intermolecular forces | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Van der Waals forces: London dispersion forces, dipole-dipole forces, and hydrogen bonding. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/introduction-to-intermolecular-forces/v/solubility?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/states-of-matter/v/phase-diagrams?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 752327 Khan Academy
Bond order, Bond Length and Bond Strength
 
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Bond order is 1,2,3 for single,double,triple bonds. It can be a fraction if there are resonance structures. Higher Bond Order means shorter, stronger bonds. Examples here include CO, CO2, CH3OH, CH3COOH, CH3COO(-), ClO(-), ClO2(-), ClO3(-) and ClO4(-).
Views: 46500 chemistNATE
Watch In Slow-Motion As Kevlar Fibers Are Put To The Test
 
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Impossible Engineering | Thursdays at 9/8c Kevlar's strands form hydrogen bonds that stick like glue. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Science Channel GO: https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/impossible-engineering/ More of the Impossible! http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/impossible-engineering/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ScienceChannel Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ScienceChannel
Views: 44087 Science Channel
Petr Tolstoy: Cooperativity of Strong Hydrogen Bonds Studied by Liquid State NMR Spectroscopy
 
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Petr Tolstoy: Cooperativity of Strong Hydrogen Bonds Studied by Liquid State NMR Spectroscopy In English
Views: 38 SPINUS
H-Bombs and H-Bonds
 
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My friend and I wrote a rap for our AP Chemistry class. the beat is ratatat beat 1. Lyrics: (J-Gadsby) Dropping H-bombs about these h-bonds you know the bonds are strong they get all the blondes and it aint magic no harry potter no wands happy days when it bonds fo to the o to the n the fons (A-rizzle) dipole dipole you know how we roll gangster love from the streets they have their moment bonding strong but not so potent out of all the forces theyre the most hood getting into fights but maybe just misunderstood the ray lewis of molecules, they lay the wood (chorus) this is the chorus we wrote this song with a thesaurus all about intermolecular forces cause chemistry is one of our favorite courses this lines here to take up time cause we couldnt think of a better rhyme all about intermolec forces cause chemistry's one of our favorite courses (J-Gadsby) how come every time that you come around my london dispersion force just won't go down study them all week find out that theyre weak can barely hold a molecule that aint tongue in cheek get stronger with more mass like students stuck in class the weakest in the stack thats wickity wickity wack alone in their own wolf pack now i throw it to a-rizzle he's on the attack (A-rizzle) yo, so now you know, mr solo do lo intermolecular forces like a boss, fo sho h bonds like james bond shaken not stirred the strongest of the strong medium is the dipole dipole i love chem, but i'm on parole last we got the LDF, too weak to say we da best (Chorus) (A-rizzle) yo, rapping off the walls about van der waals (J-gadsby) Its hard to keep a straight face a-rizzles bringing the sizzle hes just gonna put this beat in its place chemistry 2010-2011 the course is rapped
Views: 272 John Gaddis
New chemistry makes strong bonds weak
 
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Researchers at Princeton have developed a new chemical reaction that breaks the strongest bond in a molecule instead of the weakest, completely reversing the norm for reactions in which bonds are evenly split to form reactive intermediates. Published on July 13 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the non-conventional reaction is a proof of concept that will allow chemists to access compounds that are normally off-limits to this pathway. The team used a two-component catalyst system that works in tandem to selectively activate the strongest bond in the molecule, a nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bond through a process known as proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). "This PCET chemistry was really interesting to us. In particular, the idea that you can use catalysts to modulate an intrinsic property of a molecule allows you to access chemical space that you couldn't otherwise," said Robert Knowles, an assistant professor of chemistry who led the research. Using PCET as a way to break strong bonds is seen in many essential biological systems, including photosynthesis and respiration, he said. Though this phenomenon is known in biological and inorganic chemistry settings, it hasn't been widely applied to making new molecules—something Knowles hopes to change. Given the unexplored state of PCET catalysis, Knowles decided to turn to theory instead of the trial and error approach usually taken by synthetic chemists in the initial stages of reaction development. Using a simple mathematical formula, the researchers calculated, for any pair of catalysts, the pair's combined "effective bond strength," which is the strength of the strongest bond they could break. Because both molecules independently contribute to this value, the research team had a high degree of flexibility in designing the catalyst system. http://phys.org/news/2015-07-chemistry-strong-bonds-weak.html
Views: 267 Star News
Chemistry Music Video 17:  Hydrogen Bonds
 
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This song explains the hydrogen bond attractive force and why water molecules have strong attractions despite their small relative size. Music and lyrics copyright 2007 by Mark Rosengarten. All rights reserved. Lyrics: Hydrogen bonds Bugs in a pond Walking across Some looking lost Why dont they fall in? Surface tension Hydrogen bonds Hydrogen bonds Small molecules They arent fools They can attract They wont attack H positive O negative Opposite ends They become friends H2O small Whys it liquid at all (CO2 gas Its got more mass) H2Os got Hydrogen bonds Bugs, they can cross Walking the pond Capillary Action, you see Cause it must be A high E.N.D. (ELECTRONEGATIVITY DIFFERENCE!!!) Got polar ends (The molecule bends) The O at the joint High boiling point Its not volatile (Just not its style) Hydrogen bonds Hydrogen bonds H on one side N, O or F on the other Its really polar And attracts like a mother! Dipole attraction from hell I love hydrogen bondssowell!!!!!
Views: 38199 Mark Rosengarten
Bond Type Lyrics (Icon Parody)
 
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Kris "Kdot" Fabian (Per. 3) Kathaleeya Peou (Per. 5) Omar Ochoa (Per. 4) (Verse 1) What you call a bond type livin’? Got covalent so you know they killin’ (strong) Got ionic bonds and they weaker, woah, Hydrogen bonds even weaker, woah, Bout to get together with attraction, (woo) Fear water, hydrophobic interactions (woo) I need you to listen to the vision (woo) Use electrons is the mission (woo) Share or exchange the decision, Bonds stay forming by the minute, Three bonds and they acting way different, (Hook) What you call a bond type livin’? What you call a bond type livin’ (livin’) B-b-bond type livin’ (woo) What you call a bond type livin’ (livin’) What you call a b-b-bond type? (Verse 2) Bond types they be forming on their valence, Got electrons forming on surveillance, Covalent bonds and it’s looking pretty simple, Bonds form, could be double or a triple, What you call a bond type livin’? Got covalent so you know they killin’ (strong) Got ionic bonds and they weaker, woah, Hydrogen bonds even weaker, woah, Real quick let’s talk about ionic, It’s important so keep your eyes on it, These bonds they be transferring electrons, Bonds get weaker, one thing I’m correct on, What’s next? Let’s talk about the h-bonds, H meaning hydrogen, The polarity thats riding in, Two polar molecules, thats what be attracting in, Positive and negative thats what be attaching em, Man, on top of that bonds lookin’ real sticky, Water properties looking real tricky, Cohesion showing off surface tension, Adhesion with capillary action, The bonds sticky but did i ever mention, That when there’s meniscus it sticks to glass forming up some type of lenses, Man, let me take you on an adventure, All the different bonds to venture, The strength of the bond’s what we measure, Man, all the different bonds to venture, The strength of the bond’s what we measure, Thanks for listening, it has been my pleasure. (Verse 3) What you call a bond type livin’? Got covalent so you know they killin’ (strong) Got ionic bonds and they weaker, woah, Hydrogen bonds even weaker, woah, Bout to get together with attraction, (woo) Fear water, hydrophobic interactions (woo) I need you to listen to the vision (woo) Use electrons is the mission (woo) Man, share or exchange the decision, Bonds stay forming by the minute, Three bonds and they way different, I need you to listen to the vision (woo) Use electrons is the mission (woo) Share or exchange the decision, (woo) Bonds stay forming by the minute, (woo) Bout to get together with attraction, (woo) Fear water, hydrophobic interactions (woo) I need you to listen to the vision (woo) Use electrons is the mission (woo) Man, share or exchange the decision, Bonds stay forming by the minute, Three bonds and they acting way different, (Hook) What you call a bond type livin’? What you call a bond type livin’ (livin’) B-b-bond type livin’ (woo) What you call a bond type livin’ (livin’) What you call a b-b-bond type? What you call a bond type livin’ (livin’) What you call a b-b-bond type? Instrumental by Zeven No copyright infringement intended. This video is for educational and aesthetic purposes only.
Views: 84 kathaleeya
What are the Factors affecting Strength of Hydrogen Bond - H2ChemHacks
 
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Hydrogen Bonds are found between simple molecules that contain either H-F, H-O or H-N bonds. Two factors affect the effectiveness of Hydrogen bonds and hence the boiling point of the molecule. The first factor is extensiveness of the Hydrogen bond, or the average number of Hydrogen bonds each molecule can form. If a molecule can form more Hydrogen bonds, then during boiling more Hydrogen bonds need to be broken which results in a higher boiling point. The second factor is the polarity of the H-F, H-O and H-N bond. In H-F bond is the most polar hence the hydrogen bond that results from this is the strongest, while H-N bond is the least polar which results in the weakest hydrogen bond. To learn more about each of these factors and when to consider them, watch this video tutorial now! Topic - Chemical Bonding, Physical Chemistry, JC, H2, A Level Chemistry, Singapore Found this video useful? Please LIKE this video and SHARE it with your friends. SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube Channel for new A Level H2 Chemistry video lessons every week! Any feedback, comments or questions to clarify? Suggestions for new video lessons? Drop them in the COMMENTS Section, I would love to hear from you! Do you know you can learn Chemistry Concepts under a minute? Follow me on Instagram for my weekly one-minute video lessons at https://www.instagram.com/chemistryguru/ I am also conducting JC H2 Chemistry classes at Bishan Central, Singapore. With my years of experience tutoring hundreds of JC students since 2010, I am confident that I can make H2 Chemistry Simpler for you too! For more information please visit https://chemistryguru.com.sg/ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch my latest video: "Triiodomethane or Iodoform Test" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88ZUCh8Xd3k -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Intermolecular Forces
 
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Watch more videos on http://www.brightstorm.com/science/chemistry SUBSCRIBE FOR All OUR VIDEOS! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=brightstorm2 VISIT BRIGHTSTORM.com FOR TONS OF VIDEO TUTORIALS AND OTHER FEATURES! http://www.brightstorm.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/brightstorm Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/brightstorm/ Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+brightstorm/ Twitter ► https://twitter.com/brightstorm_ Brightstorm website ► https://www.brightstorm.com/
Views: 424375 Brightstorm
Hydrogen Bonds in Supersonic Jets - Dance Your PhD 2018
 
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HYDROGEN BOND is a weak interaction, between a molecule that has a hydrogen attached to an atom that is more electronegative than itself, and another molecule that has an electron rich center. These are considered to be weak bonds, but are extremely important for life as we know it. Water, responsible for life on earth, is liquid at ambient temperatures because of hydrogen bonds between water molecules. Our very own DNA can faithfully replicate itself and perpetuate genetic information. This is possible because of the double stranded structure of the DNA, that is formed due to hydrogen bonds between its constituent "nucleobases". During my PhD, I have been involved in studying such hydrogen bonds, especially those in between nitrogen containing molecules. In ambient conditions, these hydrogen bonds undergo making and breaking due to the innumerable collisions. Therefore, to study these "weak" in without the influence of the environment, we exploit the properties of SUPERSONIC JETS. Supersonic Jets are formed when a gas expands through a tiny aperture from a high pressure region to a low pressure region. As this jet expands into the vacuum, the number of collisions decrease, till there are almost none. As the density of molecules is very less in these jets, we need strong light sources like lasers to study them. The consequences of the interaction of these molecules with light help us deduce various properties of molecules and clusters of molecules. This is suited for the studies of intrinsic properties of hydrogen bonds. I would like to express my gratitude to my Bharatanatyam teacher Ms. Meenakshi Srivastava Bhalekar (Natraj Dance Classes) for the choreography and constant encouragement. I also take this opportunity to thank my PhD guide, Prof Sanjay Wategaonkar (TIFR). Music in the video: 1) Melodies In Mridangam Music – Carnatic Classical Instrumental – Dr.T.V.Gopalkrishnan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbGw7tkn6ic Used with kind permission from Geethanjali - Indian Classical Music. 2) Marugelara and Bhajare Gopalam from Carnatic Instrumental Flute - Best of Dr.N.Ramani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhfsKWLDf7A&t=964s
Views: 627 Viola D'mello
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2266577 Khan Academy
General Chemistry - U2-L4 : Hydrogen bonding
 
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جامعة الملك خالد - عمادة التعلم الالكتروني المقررات المفتوحة كيمياء عامة 1 - 110كيم General Chemistry - U2-L4 : Hydrogen bonding Intermolecular attraction force (IAF) 1- Definition of Hydrogen bonding 2- How does it occur? 3- Hydrogen bonding in water 4- Inter- and intra-hydrogen bonding
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 42203 Socratica
What Are Intermolecular Forces | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn what intermolecular forces are, the three most common types and the differences between them. An intermolecular force is simply an attractive force between neighbouring molecules. There are three common types of intermolecular force: permanent dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' forces. All these three forces are very much weaker than ionic or covalent bonds which bind atoms and ions together in elements and compounds. Permanent dipole-dipole forces: A polar molecule is one in which there is a permanent dipole, arising usually because the different atoms in the molecule have different electro-negativities. Hydrogen chloride is a polar molecule as the pair of electrons in the H---Cl bond are nearer the Cl atom because it has a greater electronegativity than the H atom. The two electrons of the covalent bond between the hydrogen and chlorine atoms are nearer the chlorine atom because of its greater electronegativity. Thus there will be an attraction between the chlorine atom of one molecule and the hydrogen atom of a neighbouring molecule. Hydrogen bonds: The second type of intermolecular force is the hydrogen bond. The permanent dipole in a covalent bond between a hydrogen atom and a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom is particularly strong. Thus the attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is much stronger than the permanent dipole-dipole attraction between the two hydrogen chloride molecules. This particular type of dipole-dipole attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is given the special name of hydrogen bond. Even though a hydrogen bond has only about 5% the strength of a covalent bond, it does have significant effects on the physical properties of compounds. Were it not for hydrogen bonds both water and alcohol would be gases at room temperature and pressure. Hydrogen bonds explain the lower volatility of alcohols compared to that of alkanes of similar molecular mass. van der Waals’ forces: van der Waals’ forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions. They arise out of movement of the electrons in the shells.These induced dipole-dipole interactions, called van der Waals’ forces occur in all molecules, whether polar or not, but are the only intermolecular forces between non-polar molecules such as the halogens and the noble gases. As the number of electrons in the molecule increases, so do the van der Waals’ forces. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Quantum hydrogen bonds
 
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We compare the effect of the quantum mechanics of the nuclei on hydrogen bonds with strengths ranging from weak, to intermediate, to strong. For details of the calculations behind the video, see our article "Quantum nature of the hydrogen bond," Xin-Zheng Li, Brent Walker and Angelos Michaelides, PNAS, vol. 108, no. 16, pp. 6369-6373, (2011).
Views: 2840 icelcn
Water - Liquid Awesome: Crash Course Biology #2
 
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Hank teaches us why water is one of the most fascinating and important substances in the universe. Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Review: Re-watch = 00:00 Introduction = 00:42 Molecular structure & hydrogen bonds = 01:38 Cohesion & surface tension = 02:46 Adhesion = 03:31 Hydrophilic substances = 04:42 Hydrophobic substances = 05:14 Henry Cavendish = 05:49 Ice Density = 07:45 Heat Capacity = 09:10 Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Citations: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/youthdevelopment/components/0328-02.html http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/H2OProperties.html http://www.hometrainingtools.com/properties-water-science-teaching-tip/a/1274/ http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/earth/geophysics/h2o7.htm http://www.robinsonlibrary.com/science/chemistry/biography/cavendish.htm http://chemistry.mtu.edu/~pcharles/SCIHISTORY/HenryCavendish.html http://www.nndb.com/people/030/000083778/ http://www.notablebiographies.com/Ca-Ch/Cavendish-Henry.html TAGS: water, hydrogen, oxygen, molecule, covalent bond, cohesion, adhesion, polarity, hydrogen bond, surface tension, capillary action, hydrophilic, hydrophobic, ionic bond, ion, universal solvent, henry cavendish, chemistry, specific gravity, density, heat capacity, evaporation, biology, crashcourse, crash course, hank green Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 3017069 CrashCourse
Scientists Discovered The Fuel For Space Travels!
 
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Be like SMART BANANA: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L Scientists transform sunlight into a liquid fuel Hey, Mr. Banana. Turn off the lights and listen to me. Yes, it’s important. We don’t need to pay for the electricity bills anymore because I’ve just found out that a group of super smart scientists recently found a possible source of unlimited energy! Whoa! Another good news is that it’s so tiny it can fit the sun’s energy right into a molecule and stored for 18 years! We just need to get as many such molecules as possible and launch them like tiny fireflies all over the place. No more electricity bills, my friend. Let me tell you more about it. The secret of the fuel is simple. The combination of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen molecules. When these molecules are hit by sunlight, some of the bonds between atoms are rearranged to form a really strong bond for a really long time. This simple reaction traps energy within the molecule. The molecule is really strong and is reluctant to break the bonds. These molecules can be used in creating solar fuel. And guess what? This solar fuel is exactly what we need for space travels now! Stay till the end of the video. Also check out the new video about 11 places on Earth that are scientifically impossible: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IztX_vG1Jr8 Music by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 13351 SMART BANANA
Chemical Bonding - ionic, covalent and hydrogen bonds - The Chemical Level of Organization
 
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Install Tubebuddy :) https://www.tubebuddy.com/YTpromotion Thanks for watching :)
Views: 26385 Kabi
Chemistry - Liquids and Solids (8 of 59) Hydrogen Bond: Force 4
 
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Visit http://ilectureonline.com for more math and science lectures! In this video I will explain the hydrogen bond (dipole-diplole): forces 4.
Views: 1325 Michel van Biezen
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1314805 It's AumSum Time
An Unbreakable Bond | The Lion Whisperer
 
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This week we put together a compilation of some of our favourite recent bits from the channel showing how unbreakable the bond is between me and the animals. Subscribe here: http://bit.ly/LionWhispererTV and help #SaveLions Website: http://www.lionwhisperer.co.za Twitter: https://twitter.com/lionwhispererSA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LionWhispererSA Instagram: http://instagram.com/lionwhisperersa The Kevin Richardson Wildlife Sanctuary's mission is to provide a self-sustaining African carnivore sanctuary for the purposes of wild species preservation through education, awareness and funding, especially pertaining to the rapid decline of large carnivores in Africa due to habitat loss, human-predator conflict, unscrupulous hunting, disease and their illegal trade. To raise awareness, Kevin has now set up his YouTube Channel 'LionWhispererTV'. The channel is all about raising awareness about not only the declining numbers of lions, but also how this rapid decrease is happening. By watching these videos, you are directly contributing to our scheme of land acquisition. Kevin captures the majority of his footage on GoPro cameras, allowing the viewer to get as close as possible to the lions. By doing this, Kevin hopes to give people an insight into the lives of these beautiful creatures and to let them see just what they can do to help. You can nearly touch them.
Views: 18167317 The Lion Whisperer
Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology
 
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Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds Instructor: Graham Walker View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/7-01SCF11 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 29261 MIT OpenCourseWare
Why does ice float in water? - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-does-ice-float-in-water-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Water is a special substance for several reasons, and you may have noticed an important one right in your cold drink: ice. Solid ice floats in liquid water, which isn't true for most substances. But why? George Zaidan and Charles Morton explain the science behind how how hydrogen bonds keep the ice in your glass (and the polar ice caps) afloat. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Powerhouse Animation Studios Inc.
Views: 749892 TED-Ed
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
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This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 135404 Crash Chemistry Academy
Dipole Forces
 
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017 - Dipole Forces In this video Paul Andersen describes the intermolecular forces associated with dipoles. A dipole is a molecule that has split charge. Dipole may form associations with other dipoles, induced dipoles or ions. An important type of dipole-dipole forces are hydrogen bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:ADN Animation.gif." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ADN_animation.gif. "File:GC DNA Base Pair.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GC_DNA_base_pair.svg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:NaCl.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaCl.png. "File:Water Molecule 3D.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_molecule_3D.svg.
Views: 315023 Bozeman Science
Surface tension | States of matter and intermolecular forces | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Surface tension in water, and how the surface tension is related to hydrogen bonding. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/introduction-to-intermolecular-forces/v/capillary-action-and-why-we-see-a-meniscus?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/introduction-to-intermolecular-forces/v/solubility?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 235010 Khan Academy
What is Hair Bonding? +91 9900170130 WIG DESIGNS INTERNATIONAL - wigs in Bangalore INDIA
 
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How to Fixing a Men Hair Piece using Glue based Hair System Bonding Technique in Bangalore ... a semi permanent solution that allows you to lead an active life, without the fear of the wig falling off. Best quality, 100% natural human hair. Santhosh Kumar.G, C.E.O WIG DESIGNS INTERNATIONAL (a unit of S.K.Hair N Wig Designs Pvt.Ltd.) ***an ISO 9001:2008 certified company*** +91 9900170130 | +91 7829338459 WhatsApp: 9900170130 Skype: wigdesignsinternational Customer Care: +91 8088899099 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.wigsdesign.in ** Video Rights Reserved ** Local Ads. Global Reach. How About One For You? [email protected] +91 7036296388 Music credit: 1.37 Sleepy Jake Silent Partner YouTube Audio Library http://lalmediamagic.blogspot.in http://www.facebook.com/lal.mediamagic http://www.dailymotion.com/lalmediamagic http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVTvUGlMeP_lFgA379EJQ7Q http://twitter.com/LalMM9 http://plus.google.com/+LalMediaMagic http://lalmediamagic.blogspot.com/2016/12/what-is-hair-bonding-by-wig-designs.html Video Transcript : Hair Bonding is a technique of fixing a Hair Piece, limited to the area of baldness Hair Piece, that matches the size, texture and color of the natural hair, with glue Taking measurement of the Hair Loss area Trimming of the surface area of Hair Loss, in progress While taking measurement, we mark the Hair Loss area, so only the hair within is trimmed Scalp Protector (antiseptic) is sprayed across the trimmed area, as a hygienic measure No burning sensation, from the Scalp Protector Since glue will stick to the newly shaved area, the Scalp Protector serves as a disinfectant The selected Hair Piece will now be glued onto the Hair Loss area, & then trimmed to suit the client's original hair crop & style The selected Hair Piece is carefully placed on the trimmed surface, to check if it matches in size We adjust the forehead line, to the desired area, making the forehead look broader or narrower No side-effects. Absolutely safe & hygienic. Only quality, imported glue & accessories used here The glue ensures that the Hair Piece stays firmly in place The benefit of Hair Bonding is that the Hair Piece will not come off with activity. Even if he swings, swims, travels, or rides a 2-wheeler... Natural look, blends well into the original hairline. Gives you the freedom to style. Comb back, towards the side, etc. Will still look natural. This client combs to the side We now proceed to style & set the Hair Piece, to match & restore When combed backwards, the hairline on the forehead is absolutely natural, due to the Glue The Hair Piece comes with long hair Personal care Our products are 100% Natural Human Hair, so the color will not fade, even if washed repeatedly. You can shower as usual - even have a thorough headwash. Take care to use a quality shampoo. Avoid applying coconut / vegetable oil. Hair Oils, Hair Serum or Styling Gels are fine. You can buy our Hair Maintenance KIT includes all necessities. If visiting a salon for a hair cut or hairstyling, inform them that you are wearing a Hair Piece - they'll not disturb it We also do servicing of all Hair Pieces & Wigs. A monthly visit to our studio is ideal. Reducing the volume of the Hair Piece, to resemble the client's original hair crop. This client lost a major portion of hair in the frontal scalp area, over the past one year find the right solution. If you have lost hair, or started losing recently, you can also wear Men's Hair Pieces... We suggest clients to have two Hair Pieces at a time ...will also reduce wear & tear, as compared to depending on a single Hair Piece ...by using the two Hair Pieces alternately The Hair Piece blended in so well with the natural hair, that it is almost impossible to tell the difference. Please use only MINIMAL temperature, to blow-dry Hair Pieces & Wigs to avoid damage Once blow-dried, the Hair Piece regains its natural bounce, style & shape Applying Hair Serum will give the Hair Piece, shine & natural feel Applying coconut or vegetable oils, will attract dust & grime. You will need to wash the Hair Piece often. When showering, you can shampoo with your Hair Piece on. Since it is glued, water will not seep in. It is advisable to visit us once a month at least, to get the Hair Piece professionally serviced. We have an optional package for professional monthly service of Hair Pieces & Wigs. You can also buy the KIT containing all the accessories to maintain your Hair Piece, from us. Natural looking hair partition & scalp. No inconvenience during the procedure... The client is happy that he looks nicer than before ... Firm, like natural hair crop We have the professional expertise to give you the best product placement The client says he is 100% satisfied, best solution for hair loss "hair" "bonding" "fixing" "non" "surgical" "bangalore" "hyderabad" "chennai" "replacement" "weaving" "transplant" "Patch" "loss" "solution" "for" "in"
Views: 398501 Lal Media Magic
√ Attractive forces between molecules | Water | Chemistry
 
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#iitutor #Chemistry #Water https://www.iitutor.com/ Hydrogen bonding • The hydrogen bond is a special type of dipole-dipole force between molecules that have an H atom bound to a small, highly electronegative atom with lone pair electrons. N, O and F are those atoms that strongly withdraw electron density from H. As a result N-H, O-H and F-H bonds are very polar and H becomes partially positive. The partially positive H of one molecule is attracted to the partially negative lone pair on N, O or F of another molecule. This attraction is called hydrogen bond. • The small sizes of N, O or F are vital to H-bond The small sizes allow these atoms to be strongly electronegative and their bonded H to be highly positive The small sizes allow the lone pair on N, O or F to come closer to the H • Other electronegative elements such as chlorine, bromine and sulfur do not form hydrogen bonds. Although H-Cl, H-Br and H-S bonds are polar, the attractive force between the partially positive hydrogen atoms and the lone electron pairs on other chlorine, bromine and sulfur atoms is not as strong as that between H and N, O or F. The chlorine, bromine and sulfur atoms are much larger and the lone pair electrons are not as accessible to the partial positively charged hydrogen atoms. Summary of the essential requirements for hydrogen bonding • H atom bonded to strongly electronegative and small N, O or F so that H atom becomes partially positively charged. • Lone pair of electrons on a N, O or F of another molecule which can attract the partially positive H atom. Significance and features of H bonding • The strength of hydrogen bonds is in general about ten times those of dipole-¬dipole forces but about one-tenth those of ionic or covalent bonds. • Hydrogen bonds are extremely important in biological systems and play a critical role in determining the structure of proteins, For example, DNA molecule consists of two chains. Each is held together by strong covalent bonds, but millions of H bonds link one chain to the other to form a double helix. • Hydrogen bonding is important in many chemical systems. Boiling and melting points typically rise as molar mass increases, as we can see in the Group 4 hydrides, CH4 through SnH4. However, the first member in each series – NH3, H2O and HF- deviates enormously from this expectation. This is because H-bonds keep these molecules together and additional energy is required to break the H-bonds to separate these molecules to liquid state or gas state. H-bond and uniqueness of water • The presence of hydrogen bonding accounts for many of the unique properties of water. For example, the arrangement of water molecules in ice creates a very open structure which causes the density of ice to be less than that of liquid water. • When ice melts, the regular lattice breaks up and the water molecules can pack more closely to form a liquid of somewhat higher density. Without hydrogen bonding, ice would sink to the bottom of oceans and lakes, a process that in cold climates would cause the death of fish and other aquatic life.
Views: 652 iitutor.com
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic Bond | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1122465 It's AumSum Time
Sigma and Pi bonds
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. In chemistry, sigma bonds (σ bonds) are the strongest type of covalent chemical bond.[1] They are formed by head-on overlapping between atomic orbitals. Sigma bonding is most clearly defined for diatomic moleculesusing the language and tools of symmetry groups. In this formal approach, a σ-bond is symmetrical with respect to rotation about the bond axis. By this definition, common forms of sigma bonds are s+s, pz+pz, s+pz and dz2+dz2 (where z is defined as the axis of the bond).[2] Quantum theory also indicates that molecular orbitals (MO) of identical symmetry actually mix. As a practical consequence of this mixing of diatomic molecules, thewavefunctions s+s and pz+pz molecular orbitals become blended. The extent of this mixing (or blending) depends on the relative energies of the like-symmetry MO's In chemistry, pi bonds (π bonds) are covalent chemical bonds where two lobes of one involved atomic orbital overlap two lobes of the other involved atomic orbital. Each of these atomic orbitals is zero at a shared nodal plane, passing through the two bonded nuclei. The same plane is also a nodal plane for the molecular orbital of the pi bond.
Views: 108500 7activestudio
Hydrogen Bond-written by Stacey Japhta
 
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Twitter: @staceyjaphta Instagram: @staceyjaphta This is a song I wrote a couple of weeks ago, it's called "Hydrogen Bond". I wrote it for the graduating seniors 2013. I've been very scared to upload original songs on youtube, but I've finally got the courage. A hydrogen bond- written by Stacey Japhta Chords: (No capo) G, Cad9, Em7, Cad9 Verse 1 It's gonna take some time for me To settle down It's hard when you're right for me But I can't have you near Chorus Can 1000 miles break a hydrogen bond Built off love this strong Noooo You're the sugar to my phosphate The base of my life You do more then suffice Verse 2 One day has been enough I want you back To see you smile I'd risk all Chorus Can 1000 miles break a hydrogen bond Built off love this strong Noooo You're the sugar to my phosphate The base of my life You do more then suffice Coda I didn't think that I could fall in love Something so simple turned into A whole new world And you opened eyes Expanded my arisen Chorus Can 1000 miles break a hydrogen bond Built off love this strong Noooo You're the sugar to my phosphate The base of my life You do more then suffice
Views: 2576 Stacey Japhta
How to Biology & Anatomy: Hydrogen bonds
 
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See the original video here: http://www.showme.com/sh/?h=5d4EwRU Created by Dale Ledford, a college Biology, Human Anatomy, and Physiology instructor in Blountville, Tennessee. Watch thousands of other great lessons, or create your own! Download ShowMe from the app store: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/showme-interactive-whiteboard/id445066279?mt=8&ls=1
Views: 223 ShowMe App
Allison Strong and Trev remember growing up in Union City
 
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Allison Strong from Netflix's "The Week Of" and Steve Trevelise both have Union City roots. Nothing bonds people faster! New to the page? Subscribe above! Visit our website: http://nj1015.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nj1015 Follow us: https://twitter.com/nj1015 Receive our newsletter: http://nj1015.com/registration/ For any licensing requests please contact [email protected]
Views: 93 New Jersey 101.5
"H-bonds sunk the Titanic" Oceanography Project ESS 15
 
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Class Project for Oceanography ESS 15 UCLA
Views: 702 Crystal Guerrero
Naming Acids Introduction
 
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How do you name acids? We'll learn how to look at the chemical formula for an acid and then write its name. We will focus on both acids without oxygen and also acids that contain oxygen, which are sometimes called oxoacids. In order to name an acid, you need separate the H+ from the negative ion. Then you figure out the name of the negative ion, and use rules for acid compound naming. If the negative ion ends in -ide, the acid is hydro- -ic acid. If the negative ion ends in -ate, the acid is -ic acid. If the negative ion ends in -ite, the acid is -ous acid. It's also important to note that there are some exceptions: phosphoric acid, phosphorous acid, sulfuric acid and sulfurous acid.
Views: 703289 Tyler DeWitt
Pastor B.R Malomane - Be Strong And Do It.
 
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13 January 2019 1 Chronicles 28 1 - 6 / 10 & 20 John 2 1 - 5

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