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The Articles of Confederation - Becoming the United States - Extra History - #1
 
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When the thirteen colonies of North America broke away from Great Britain, they struggled to draft their first constitution. After great debate, they created the Articles of Confederation and formed the United States of America. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1189068 Extra Credits
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4468608 CrashCourse
The Articles of Confederation - The Constitution Before the Constitution
 
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→Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 →How "Dick" came to be short for 'Richard': https://youtu.be/BH1NAwwKtcg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2Acy6g9Ta7hzC0Rr3RDS6q Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut The Nazis, The British Accent, and BBC News https://youtu.be/_hRQq5e7Wi0?list=PLR0XuDegDqP3-uys3Rl2dvdsFkk96zRbt The Truth About Double Jeopardy https://youtu.be/Tgjip92-ZMg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP0GESJ0DgpgTcThLJVEbFs8 In this video: For four hot, humid July days, 56 delegates of the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia with one purpose – to ratify the Declaration of Independence. The document, originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson with the help of Ben Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, ad Robert Livingston, declared that the thirteen American colonies were now independent and free of the tyranny of the British Empire. On July 4th, with the final wording in place, it was ready for the whole world to read; though, it would be about another month before congress would actually sign it, contrary to popular belief. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/12/articles-confederation-constitution-constitution/ Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Articles http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/artconf.asp http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Revolutionary_War http://books.google.com/books?id=pFXLAMC1xtUC&q=127#v=snippet&q=127&f=false http://www.cliffsnotes.com/more-subjects/american-government/the-constitution/the-articles-of-confederation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shays%27_Rebellion http://johncashon.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/shays-rebellion-and-the-articles-of-confederation/ http://huntingtonhomestead.org/birthdate.html
Views: 88058 Today I Found Out
The Articles of Confederation EXPLAINED [AP Government Review]
 
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In this video Heimler explains our nation's first governing document: the Articles of Confederation. During the Revolutionary War it was the Articles of Confederation that governed the new United States, and in order to understand the U.S. Constitution and all the decisions that were made in its writing, you have to first understand the Articles. Under the Articles of Confederation the only federal body with any power was a Congress. There was no president and no judicial branch. And the Congress itself was entirely weak compared to the power invested in the states. And it was a rattling event called Shays's Rebellion that convinced America that we needed a new Constitution. So a few leaders gathered at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and ended up throwing out the Articles of Confederation and set about writing a new Constitution. This video, in case you were wondering, is keyed to the new AP U.S. Government curriculum for 2019.
Views: 844 Steve Heimler
The Articles of Confederation
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy This video explores the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, the reasons it was deliberately weak, the powers under the confederation that were granted as well as the powers that were missing. The weaknesses are discussed with the effects they had on the ability to wage war against the British and solve the problems of the new country. While this video was designed for students taking the Florida End-of-Course exam, it will help any Civics or U.S. Government students. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
What was the status of state governments under the Articles of Confederation?
 
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President of the Alturas Institute, David Adler, explores the definition of federalism and how it works. In this video, Mr. Adler discusses what the status of state governments was under the Articles of Confederation and what the status of state governments is under the Constitution. David Adler: https://www.alturasinstitute.com/new-page/ This video is part 1 of Lesson 26 (How does federalism work?) in the James Madison Legacy Project (JMLP) video series that follows the We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution high school curriculum. The video series is narrated by Greg Bernstein, Esq, consultant to the Center for Civic Education.
APUSH Review: Video #14: State Constitutions And The Articles Of Confederation
 
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Why were the Articles of Confederation designed to be weak? What were positives and negatives under the Articles of Confederation? Find out here! If you would like to download the PowerPoint and/or a Video Guide for this video, click here: https://www.apushreview.com/period-3-videos-in-order/ All images are part of the public domain.
Views: 8904 Adam Norris
America under the Articles of Confederation HD
 
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Produced by the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution at James Madison's Montpelier. Featuring: * Colleen Sheehan: Professor of Political Science, Villanova University * David O. Stewart: Author of "The Summer of 1787" and "Madison's Gift" * Gene Hickok: Montpelier Foundation Board of Directors * Hank Chambers: Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law * Stewart Harris: Professor of Law, Appalachian School of Law To take the course, go to http://www.montpelier.org/courses.
Views: 2254 Robert H. Smith
Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United State’s didn’t always have its current system of government. Actually, this is it’s second attempt. Craig will delve into the failures (and few successes) of the Articles of Confederation, tell you how delegates settled on a two-house system of representation, discuss the issues of slavery and population that have been imbedded into our constitution, and fire up the clone machine to discuss how federalists and anti-federalist opposition provided the U.S. a Bill of Rights. And who knows, maybe all this talk of compromise will even inspire Craig and eagle to find some middle ground. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1053661 CrashCourse
Systems of Government
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy This lesson teaches students about the various systems of governments used by countries around the world: unitary, confederal, federal, and parliamentary. Students will look first at the confederal systems of government with examples such as the United States under the Articles of Confederation, the Confederacy of the South during the Civil War, and the European Union, as those who established weak central governments or unions in which the regional state powers maintain political power. The union of Belgium is provided as the current country currently using a confederal form of government. The United States, Argentina, Germany and India are among those countries used as examples for national governments who share power with regional states or provinces. Smaller countries such as Britain, France and Italy who have unitary forms of governments in which central governments hold the guide the entire country and delegate certain responsibilities to local countries are used as examples in this lesson. The students will gain an understanding how unlike these three systems of governments which describe which level of government holds power, the parliamentary systems is about the executive and legislative branches. Unlike the presidential system of choosing an executive, Great Britain is provided as the example in which Parliament chooses the executive or Prime Minister for the nation. As this is Part I of a two-part lesson, the second part being"forms of government, such as Democracy and Monarchy, the review quiz is provided in the second video. Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans and activities are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Articles of Confederation
 
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The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. Nevertheless, the weakness of the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, general government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government with a chief executive (the president), courts, and taxing powers. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 412 Audiopedia
We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution
 
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In the years following the end of the American Revolution, the Continental Congress was on the brink of collapse due to the Articles of Confederation and its refusal to consider fundamental reform to the document. In professor George William Van Cleve’s book, We Have Not a Government, we encounter a sharply divided America and a Congress that grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Constitutional Convention to replace the Articles with a more flexible and powerful government. A book signing will follow the program. Live Captioning: https://www.streamtext.net/player?event=NATA17Oct23
Views: 2396 US National Archives
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United States didnt always have its current system of government. Actually, this is. John Green teaches you the history of the United States of America in 47 s! In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you.
Views: 416 hamza junco
What Were the Articles of Confederation? | History
 
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Before the U.S. Constitution was the law of the land, there were the Articles of Confederation. Find out why they didn't last long. Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com /posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 94893 HISTORY
Articles of Confederation: AP Government
 
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In this screencast lecture, I cover our first government, the Articles of Confederation. Conceived as a way to decentralize power and prevent tyranny, the government ultimately proved to be too weak and emasculated to govern the country. Shays' Rebellion showed the weaknesses of the system, prompting leaders to call for a Constitutional Convention.
Views: 394 Paul Sargent
Lessons Learned: The Articles of Confederation
 
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On March 1, 1781, the Articles of Confederation came into effect after Maryland became the thirteenth and final state to ratify them. As the first constitution for the new nation, The Articles established a national legislature but assigned it relatively little power. The individual colonies retained much of their sovereignty, and it soon became clear that such a weak federal government was ineffective. By 1787 the framers had begun writing a new constitution, the one that created the federal government Americans have today. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says that this episode in U.S. history points to the difficulty of creating a workable constitution. "It is easy to write a constitution," he says, but "hard to write a constitution that works." This lesson, he argues, should be kept in mind as countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Myanmar, and South Sudan "struggle to create effective and legitimate systems of government." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-articles-confederation/p27505
What Were the Articles of Confederation and How Were They Flawed?
 
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Mr. Driscoll and Mr. Rose discuss the nation's first government and the reasons why our fledgling nation decided to scrap it and start anew (i.e.Constitutional Convention).
Views: 5079 Modern Civics Project
What if the US kept the Articles of Confederation?
 
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The Articles of Confederation was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. Nevertheless, the weakness of the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, general government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government with a chief executive (the president), courts, and taxing powers. But what if they were never abolished? How would our world be different? Find out in the video. FOLLOW MY BLOG: http://trackmastertrain.blogspot.com/ LIKE COMMENT SUBSCRIBE :)
Economic Problems Under the Articles of Confederation
 
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Shays's Rebellion and Articles of Confederation
Views: 62581 John Mielke
Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
 
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How did our government run during the American Revolution? What was wrong with the Articles of Confederation that led to the Constitutional Convention? Watch and find out.
Views: 2893 virtualhistory360
LIMITED GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTICLES of CONFEDERATION.avi
 
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There is a time from 1781 to 1789 our government had also excised each year a new president ( for a total of 7 presidents prior to George Washington). This was also a growing time for our nation. This is very important time for all to understand our constitution. To understand what the constitution was to do. While also limit the size of government. You must understand these articles before you can understand the job the constitution was to do. You may disagree, but it is like one who does not understand division and trying to do algebra. The algebra strength is a strong understanding of all basic math functions. SO IS IT SO WITH OUR CONSTITUTION!!! TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSTITUTION AND THE JOB IT MUST FOREFILL. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND HOW IT HAD FAILED. When it became apparent that government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, little more than the shadow without the substance, agitation for a stronger federal government began. This agitation resulted in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 and the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787, which drafted the Constitution of the United States from 1786 through 1789 is the time it took to make and have the Constitution of United States of America to become the supreme law of this nation. Actually if you consider the birth of the government of 1781 to 1789 is the actual time it took for you constitution to be developed. ________________________________________ The Articles of Confederation Agreed to by Congress November 15, 1777; ratified and in force, March 1, 1781. Preamble To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting. Whereas the Delegates of the United States of America in Congress assembled did on the fifteenth day of November in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy seven, and in the Second Year of the Independence of America, agree to certain articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, in the words following, viz: Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. ________________________________________ Article I. The Stile of this Confederacy shall be "The United States of America." ________________________________________ Article II. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every Power, Jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled. ________________________________________ Article III. The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever. ________________________________________ Article IV. The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce, subject to the same duties, impositions, and restrictions as the inhabitants thereof respectively, provided that such restrictions shall not extend so far as to prevent the removal of property imported into any State, to any other State, of which the owner is an inhabitant; provided also that no imposition, duties or restriction shall be laid by any State, on the property of the united States, or either of them. If any person guilty of, or charged with, treason, felony, or other high misdemeanor in any State, shall flee from justice, and be found in any of the united States, he shall, upon demand of the Governor or executive power of the State from which he fled, be delivered up and removed to the State having jurisdiction of his offense. . YES I JD IS A PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE FOR 2012 AND ALSO CHECKOUT www.theconstitutionistparty.com Thank you for your time Jd
Views: 1435 Jd Criveau
Articles of Confederation | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Articles of Confederation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. It was approved, after much debate (between July 1776 and November 1777), by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification. The Articles of Confederation came into force on March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all 13 states. A guiding principle of the Articles was to preserve the independence and sovereignty of the states. The central government established by the Articles received only those powers which the former colonies had recognized as belonging to king and parliament.The Articles formed a war-time confederation of states, with an extremely limited central government. While unratified, the document was used by the Congress to conduct business, direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with foreign nations, and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. The adoption of the Articles made few perceptible changes in the federal government, because it did little more than legalize what the Continental Congress had been doing. That body was renamed the Congress of the Confederation; but Americans continued to call it the Continental Congress, since its organization remained the same.As the Confederation Congress attempted to govern the continually growing American states, delegates discovered that the limitations placed upon the central government rendered it ineffective at doing so. As the government's weaknesses became apparent, especially after Shays' Rebellion, individuals began asking for changes to the Articles. Their hope was to create a stronger national government. Initially, some states met to deal with their trade and economic problems. However, as more states became interested in meeting to change the Articles, a meeting was set in Philadelphia on May 25, 1787. This became the Constitutional Convention. It was quickly realized that changes would not work, and instead the entire Articles needed to be replaced. On March 4, 1789, the government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government by establishing a chief executive (the President), courts, and taxing powers.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
The Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and "Limited Government"
 
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Are your progressive friends correct to say the US Constitution is not a limited government document after all? Bill Watkins joins me to discuss both the Constitution and the Articles of Confederation, and what the light of history can tell us about each. Subscribe to the Tom Woods Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tom-woods-show/id716825890?mt=2 http://www.TomWoods.com/787 http://www.SupportingListeners.com http://www.RonPaulHomeschool.com http://www.FreeHistoryCourse.com
Views: 4802 TomWoodsTV
Federalism: Crash Course Government and Politics #4
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1588586 CrashCourse
Northwest Ordinance
 
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The Northwest Ordinance was an act of the Congress of the Confederation of the United States, passed July 13, 1787. The ordinance created the Northwest Territory, the first organized territory of the United States, from lands beyond the Appalachian Mountains, between British Canada and the Great Lakes to the north and the Ohio River to the south. The upper Mississippi River formed the Territory's western boundary. It was the response to multiple pressures: the westward expansion of American settlers, tense diplomatic relations with Great Britain and Spain, violent confrontations with Indians, the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, and the empty treasury of the American government. It was based upon but more conservative than Thomas Jefferson's proposed ordinance of 1784. The 1787 law relied on a strong central government, which was assured under the new Constitution that took effect in 1789. In August, 1789, it was replaced by the Northwest Ordinance of 1789, in which the new Congress reaffirmed the Ordinance with slight modifications. Arguably the single most important piece of legislation passed by the Confederation Congress, it established the precedent by which the Federal government would be sovereign and expand westward with the admission of new states, rather than with the expansion of existing states and their established sovereignty under the Articles of Confederation. It is the most important legislation that Congress has passed with regard to American public domain lands. The U.S. Supreme Court recognized the authority of the Northwest Ordinance of 1789 within the applicable Northwest Territory as constitutional in Strader v. Graham, 51 U.S. 82, 96, 97, but did not extend the Ordinance to cover the respective states once they were admitted to the Union. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2658 Audiopedia
Articles of Confederation (Kelis's "Milkshake" Parody) - @MrBettsClass
 
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Can Alexander Hamilton bring the delegates to the yard in order to fix the Articles of Confederation? New videos every Tuesday (sometimes Monday!) Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Tumblr: http://http://mrbettsclass.tumblr.com/ Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation are flawed, With no new amendments because, We'd need a unanimous charge, Which I tell you is impossibly hard, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, We can't tax, the states disregard, No strength to enforce the laws, This government is big faux pas, It was the country's, First Constitution, Passed in the Revolution, but Made states too strong, Fed's powers none, It's pretty dumb, We can declare war, but who will fight it? We can't force people to join the army, We can print money, so can the states, What good's a dollar that no one's taking, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, Congress can't regulate commerce, It's made the economy worse, States are putting tariffs on each other, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, To ensure limited power, Goes to the central gov, Made a system which simply does not work, There's only one branch, The Legislative, Unicameral, where is the Executive, And Justices, It's powerless, Just to pass a bill, need 9 of 13, States to approve it, won't hold my breath, People know it's weak, in Massachusetts, The Shays' Rebellion, we barely stopped it, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, I say this in Annapolis, To discuss a better system, We must meet in '87, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, Let's meet in Philadelphia, At Independence Hall, Where we will write a new Constitution!
Views: 230742 MrBettsClass
The US Constitution - Breaking Down the Articles
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy The video is a quick overview of the sections or Articles of the US Constitution. Students will learn about Article I and it's establishing the powers and structure of the US Legislative Branch known as Congress. Article II establishes and outlines the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States. Article III established the Judicial Branch headed by the US Supreme Court. Article IV discusses the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments known as federalism. Article V establishes how to create amendments to the Constitution. Article VI is known as the "Supremacy Clause" which establishes that federal law is more powerful than state law. Article VII outlines the way the US Constitution was ratified. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Articles of Confederation Song
 
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We wrote this song based on the Articles of Confederation. We explain what power it had, the problems it underwent, effects and causes. Articles of Confederation Lyrics: By: Tiffany Leung and Nicaella Chan Under the Articles of Confederation The congress was weak and so was the Nation Too little power led to frustration Only allowed to Declare war Make treaties Establish postal service Manage Indian affairs Maintain an army and navy Regulate weights and measures Coin and borrow money The rest of the power was left to the states Despite its limitations The Congress was not completely flawed Pass two very important laws The Land Ordinance of 1785 Allowed the Northwest Territory to divide Into townships 6 squares mile wide 36 sections inside The 16th section for education The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 Abolished slavery In the Northwest Territory Divided land not more than five Not less than three, politically The Northwest Ordinance was important Made new western lands as equal states Instead of subordinate colonies Which was very rare in history! BUT SOMETHING WAS WRONG SOMETHING WAS WRONG! PROBLEM ONE Congress had no power to raise taxes It had no power to regulate commerce States had all the power to tax tax tax And regulate trades trades trades -- OH NO! Without taxing power the Government was broke States wouldn't pay they thought it was a joke PROBLEM TWO To pay it's 40,000,000 dollar war debt Continental Congress issued paper money But the value was inflated It was underrated 40 dollar to one silver Dollar Creditors avoided debtors Who tried to pay with worthless money Hostility grew between these two groups PROBLEM THREE Each state exercised its sovereignty Tariff Wars! - What a catastrophe Charged rivals with tariffs An extra dollar for neighboring states PROBLEM FOUR It was like Europe nations here The Sovereign states would fight all year Jealousy and Quarreling among the states Mighty warfare broke out all day! PROBLEM FIVE Each state had different trade regulations Maddening the situation with foreign relations It was undeniable The Confederation wasn't reliable It had no power to back its agreements PROBLEM SIX No respect England and Spain waited gleefully They did not believe that a self-government Would work successfully PROBLEM SEVEN In Massachusetts Daniel shay led the way for Debt-ridden farmers struck by inflation Who couldn't pay for their plantations Refusing to go to debtor's prison Or Losing their farm to creditors A group of farmers Took up arms and went against the courts! Shay's Rebellion of 1787 worried leaders like George Washington It called for a new constitution! 1781-1788 was the ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION it failed it failed! Bt we needed some form of government. A stepping-stone to the U.S constitution!
Views: 23217 Tiffany Leung
ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION III.avi
 
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Article IX. The united States in congress assembled, shall have the sole and exclusive right and power of determining on peace and war, except in the cases mentioned in the sixth article — of sending and receiving ambassadors — entering into treaties and alliances, provided that no treaty of commerce shall be made whereby the legislative power of the respective States shall be restrained from imposing such imposts and duties on foreigners, as their own people are subjected to, or from prohibiting the exportation or importation of any species of goods or commodities whatsoever — of establishing rules for deciding in all cases, what captures on land or water shall be legal, and in what manner prizes taken by land or naval forces in the service of the United States shall be divided or appropriated — of granting letters of marque and reprisal in times of peace — appointing courts for the trial of piracies and felonies committed on the high seas and establishing courts for receiving and determining finally appeals in all cases of captures, provided that no member of Congress shall be appointed a judge of any of the said courts. The United States in Congress assembled shall also be the last resort on appeal in all disputes and differences now subsisting or that hereafter may arise between two or more States concerning boundary, jurisdiction or any other causes whatever; which authority shall always be exercised in the manner following. Whenever the legislative or executive authority or lawful agent of any State in controversy with another shall present a petition to Congress stating the matter in question and praying for a hearing, notice thereof shall be given by order of Congress to the legislative or executive authority of the other State in controversy, and a day assigned for the appearance of the parties by their lawful agents, who shall then be directed to appoint by joint consent, commissioners or judges to constitute a court for hearing and determining the matter in question: but if they cannot agree, Congress shall name three persons out of each of the United States, and from the list of such persons each party shall alternately strike out one, the petitioners beginning, until the number shall be reduced to thirteen; and from that number not less than seven, nor more than nine names as Congress shall direct, shall in the presence of Congress be drawn out by lot, and the persons whose names shall be so drawn or any five of them, shall be commissioners or judges, to hear and finally determine the controversy, so always as a major part of the judges who shall hear the cause shall agree in the determination: and if either party shall neglect to attend at the day appointed, without showing reasons, which Congress shall judge sufficient, or being present shall refuse to strike, the Congress shall proceed to nominate three persons out of each State, and the secretary of There is a time from 1781 to 1789 our government had also excised each year a new president ( for a total of 7 presidents prior to George Washington). This was also a growing time for our nation. This is very important time for all to understand our constitution. To understand what the constitution was to do. While also limit the size of government. You must understand these articles before you can understand the job the constitution was to do. You may disagree, but it is like one who does not understand division and trying to do algebra. The algebra strength is a strong understanding of all basic math functions. SO IS IT SO WITH OUR CONSTITUTION!!! TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSTITUTION AND THE JOB IT MUST FOREFILL. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND HOW IT HAD FAILED. When it became apparent that government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, little more than the shadow without the substance, agitation for a stronger federal government began. This agitation resulted in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 and the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787, which drafted the Constitution of the United States from 1786 through 1789 is the time it took to make and have the Constitution of United States of America to become the supreme law of this nation. Actually if you consider the birth of the government of 1781 to 1789 is the actual time it took for you constitution to be developed. BECAUSE IT IS SO LONG PLEASE GO TO http://www.usconstitution.net/articles.html AND THERE YOU CAN SEE THE REST OF THIS DOCUMENT JD
Views: 123 Jd Criveau
Problems with the Article of Confederation
 
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Problems: -Tax -Currency -Supreme Court -President -One Vote Issues: -Representation -State Rights vs. Central Government -Trusting Voters -Bill of Rights -Slavery
Views: 2319 Flipped History
Articles of Confederation
 
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Articles of Confederation, by Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki?curid=691 / CC BY SA 3.0 Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. It was approved, after much debate (between July 1776 and November 1777), by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification. The Articles of Confederation came into force on March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all 13 states. A guiding principle of the Articles was to preserve the independence and sovereignty of the states. The central government established by the Articles received only those powers which the former colonies had recognized as belonging to king and parliament. The Articles formed a war-time confederation of states, with an extremely limited central government. While unratified, the document was used by the Congress to conduct business, direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with foreign nations, and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. The adoption of the Articles made few perceptible changes in the federal government, because it did little more than legalize what the Continental Congress had been doing. That body was renamed the Congress of the Confederation; but Americans continued to call it the "Continental Congress", since its organization remained the same. As the Confederation Congress attempted to govern the continually growing American states, delegates discovered that the limitations placed upon the central government rendered it ineffective at doing so. As the government's weaknesses became apparent, especially after Shays' Rebellion, individuals began asking for changes to the Articles. Their hope was to create a stronger national government. Initially, some states met to deal with their trade and economic problems. However, as more states became interested in meeting to change the Articles, a meeting was set in Philadelphia on May 25, 1787. This became the Constitutional Convention. It was quickly realized that changes would not work, and instead the entire Articles needed to be replaced. On March 4, 1789, the government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government by establishing a chief executive (the President), courts, and taxing powers. The political push to increase cooperation among the then-loyal colonies began with the Albany Congress in 1754 and Benjamin Franklin's proposed Albany Plan, an inter-colonial collaboration to help solve mutual local problems. The Articles of Confederation would bear some resemblance to it. Over the next two decades, some of the basic concepts it addressed would strengthen and others would weaken, particularly the degree of deserved loyalty to the crown. With civil disobedience resulting in coercive, and what the colonials perceived as intolerable acts of Parliament, and armed conflict resulting in dissidents being proclaimed rebels and outside the King's protection, any loyalty remaining shifted toward independence and how to achieve it. In 1775, with events outpacing communications, the Second Continental Congress began acting as the provisional government that would run the American Revolutionary War and gain the colonies their collective indepe...
From Articles of Confederation to the US Constitution
 
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After Americans won independence, they faced challenges that threatened the existence of their infant nation. These pressures motivated a change in government structure from the loose confederacy of states formed during the Revolutionary War under the Articles of Confederation to a more united nation under a new constitution. Saul Cornell addresses specific clauses of the United States Constitution shaped by the experience of the war and the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation. He closes with approaches in constitutional interpretation today.
How is power divided in the United States government? - Belinda Stutzman
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers. Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.
Views: 1290277 TED-Ed
Lecture Notes: Articles of the Confederation to the Constitution
 
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analyze the development of American Constitutional government, explaining its relationship to the Enlightenment, and describe how the early national leaders implemented the new government (GPS) (SSUH_D2007-34) 34a - explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation (no Executive branch, no taxation, no national currency, and no regulation of interstate commerce) and Daniel Shays' Rebellion led to a call for a stronger central government, 34b - explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically, the Great Compromise, separation of powers, limited government, and the issue of slavery (3/5 Compromise) and connect them to the ideas of the Enlightenment, 34c - evaluate the major arguments of the anti-Federalists and Federalists during the debate on ratification of the Constitution put forth in the Federalists Papers concerning form of government, factions, checks and balances, and the power of the executive, including the roles of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, 34d - analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights,
Views: 2798 CoachBakerOnline
The Articles of Confederation Explained: U.S. History Review
 
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A review of our first Constitution, the AOC. What were the Articles of Confederation? How did it run the United States? Why did the Articles of Confederation fail? Mr. Hughes explains the basics of the Articles of Confederation including the reasons for its eventual demise. Check out the US Playlist for hundreds of videos! Now go subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesDV/featured
Views: 304901 Hip Hughes
James Madison at the Constitutional Convention by Professor Jack N. Rakove
 
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This short video focuses on James Madison’s efforts to shape deliberation at the Constitutional Convention. His major goal was to replace the system of voluntary compliance of the states under the Article of Confederation with a system of law to compel compliance under the federal Constitution. Professor Jack Rakove explains Madison’s perspective that without such a system, the different interests within each state, coupled with diverse interests among the states, precluded effective governance. James Madison at the Constitutional Convention by Professor Jack N. Rakove, William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Stanford University. American History Videos are sponsored by the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation. These videos are offered to help teachers, students and the general public learn more about America's founding and the Constitution of the United States. www.jamesmadison.gov.
The Articles of Confederation 1781
 
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http://storiesofusa.com/articles-of-confederation-1781/ - The Articles of Confederation 1781
Views: 3349 Randy King
Confederation Period | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Confederation Period Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Confederation Period was the era of United States history in the 1780s after the American Revolution and prior to the ratification of the United States Constitution. In 1781, the United States ratified the Articles of Confederation and prevailed in the Battle of Yorktown, the last major land battle between British and American forces in the American Revolutionary War. American independence was confirmed with the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris. The fledgling United States faced several challenges, many of which stemmed from the lack of a strong national government and unified political culture. The period ended in 1789 following the ratification of the United States Constitution, which established a new, more powerful, national government. The Articles of Confederation established a loose confederation of states with a weak federal government. An assembly of delegates acted on behalf of the states they represented. This unicameral body, officially referred to as the United States in Congress Assembled, had little authority, and could not accomplish anything independent of the states. It had no chief executive, and no court system. Congress lacked the power to levy taxes, regulate foreign or interstate commerce, or effectively negotiate with foreign powers. The weakness of Congress proved self-reinforcing, as the leading political figures of the day served in state governments or foreign posts. The failure of the national government to handle the challenges facing the United States led to calls for reform and frequent talk of secession. The Treaty of Paris left the United States with a vast territory spanning from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River. Settlement of the trans-Appalachian territories proved difficult, in part due to the resistance of Native Americans and the neighboring foreign powers of Great Britain and Spain. The British refused to evacuate American territory, while the Spanish used their control of the Mississippi River to stymie Western settlement. In 1787, Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance, which set an important precedent by establishing the first organized territory under the control of the national government. After Congressional efforts to amend the Articles failed, numerous national leaders met in Philadelphia in 1787 to establish a new constitution. The new constitution was ratified in 1788, and the new Federal government of the United States began meeting in 1789, marking the end of the Critical Period. Some historians believe that the 1780s were a bleak, terrible time for Americans, while others have argued that the period was actually stable and relatively prosperous.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
01:22:39
Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 2689 Greatest AudioBooks
Lecture 11 - The U.S. Constitution
 
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After the failure of the Articles of Confederation, the second government of the United States emerges under the Constitution. Discussions at the Constitutional Convention between Federalists and Anti-Federalists as well as representatives of the smaller and larger states shape this new document.
Confederation Period | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Confederation Period Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Confederation Period was the era of United States history in the 1780s after the American Revolution and prior to the ratification of the United States Constitution. In 1781, the United States ratified the Articles of Confederation and prevailed in the Battle of Yorktown, the last major land battle between British and American forces in the American Revolutionary War. American independence was confirmed with the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris. The fledgling United States faced several challenges, many of which stemmed from the lack of a strong national government and unified political culture. The period ended in 1789 following the ratification of the United States Constitution, which established a new, more powerful, national government. The Articles of Confederation established a loose confederation of states with a weak federal government. An assembly of delegates acted on behalf of the states they represented. This unicameral body, officially referred to as the United States in Congress Assembled, had little authority, and could not accomplish anything independent of the states. It had no chief executive, and no court system. Congress lacked the power to levy taxes, regulate foreign or interstate commerce, or effectively negotiate with foreign powers. The weakness of Congress proved self-reinforcing, as the leading political figures of the day served in state governments or foreign posts. The failure of the national government to handle the challenges facing the United States led to calls for reform and frequent talk of secession. The Treaty of Paris left the United States with a vast territory spanning from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River. Settlement of the trans-Appalachian territories proved difficult, in part due to the resistance of Native Americans and the neighboring foreign powers of Great Britain and Spain. The British refused to evacuate American territory, while the Spanish used their control of the Mississippi River to stymie Western settlement. In 1787, Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance, which set an important precedent by establishing the first organized territory under the control of the national government. After Congressional efforts to amend the Articles failed, numerous national leaders met in Philadelphia in 1787 to establish a new constitution. The new constitution was ratified in 1788, and the new Federal government of the United States began meeting in 1789, marking the end of the Critical Period. Some historians believe that the 1780s were a bleak, terrible time for Americans, while others have argued that the period was actually stable and relatively prosperous.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Forming A Government - Articles of Confederation VS The Constitution
 
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Trimester 1 Notes 5 - In these notes I give a brief overview of The Articles of Confederation and the need for a Second Constitutional Convention. These notes were created for my Middle School 8th Grade US History class and these notes work well with Chapter 4 of: Deverell, William, and Deborah G. White. Holt United States History. California Teacher's ed. Orlando, Fla.: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2006. Print. Find more at historywithmissgreene.com
AP Government and Politics - The Constitution - The Articles of Confederation Video #2 Old Version
 
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In this video, the Articles of Confederation are looked at with a magnifiying glass, and we see the good things (not many) and the bad things (too many) about it. If you have anything that you want to tell me personally, go ahead and email me at [email protected] Follow me on any of the following! Twitter - https://twitter.com/apforteens1
Views: 117 APFORTEENS
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
01:22:39
Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 16 David Hunt
The Constitution Song ("Despacito" Parody)
 
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Review the United States Constitution, Preamble and purpose, Articles and Amendments, all to the song of the summer, "Despacito." PrepIT for APUSH and AP GOV Link - http://bit.ly/PrepIT Support MrBettsClass on Patreon - http://bit.ly/PatreonMBC APUSH Shirt - http://bit.ly/MBCAPUSH Historical Parody/Skits every Thursday Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation They be giving us, such frustration, yeah Limits feel like strangulation, yeah Oh, we must meet up in Philadelphia Close the windows and lock the doors We the people of the US in order To form a more perfect Union, provide For the defense, see Justice ain’t denied Promote the general welfare of all our lives Oh, yeah, and to insure domestic Tranquility And to secure the Blessings of Liberty To ourselves and our Posterity (ordain this) Constitution Splitting up the government into three branches Executive, Judicial, and the Legislative Separating powers and insuring balance Constitution Building on the concepts of the Magna Carta Locke, Voltaire, and Baron Montesquieu are borrowed Still James Madison is called its father (What does, what does, what does, what does, it say) Article I’s about the Congress House and Senate They regulate and tax, declare war Writing laws with the elastic clause (Necessary and proper, baby) President and Executive fall under Article II III’s about the Judicial Branch Both of these parts are brand new Article IV’s about relation Between the states and nation V covers new amendments And their ratification VI is saying federal law will always be Supreme VII says to make this real nine states will have to agree Checks and balances ensure no branch is growing too strong The Court declares unconstitutional what it thinks is wrong If the law ain’t good, the President can veto Congress can override, impeach his seat too Federalists papers, 85 to make ya Want this Constitution, Publius’s a faker It’s really Hamilton, John Jay, and Madison Still there is one thing I can’t help feel is missing Oh yeah Constitution Will pass if we promise to have a Bill of Rights 10 Amendments, I could talk about them all night Wanna know them, click here, and you will be alright Constitution Delaware’s the first state to ratify New Hampshire is ninth, it’s now bonafide And the new plan takes effect nationwide (Huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah) A living document, it’s meant to adapt to the times 27 Amendments so far One repealed ‘cause it went too far (Prohibition, prohibition, baby) Representative democracy, ensures the people Are the real source of power And this country remains ours Constitution We the people wanted a more perfect Union Founding Fathers came up with this great solution Plan of government that we are still using Constitution
Views: 280919 MrBettsClass
APUSH Review: The Articles of Confederation
 
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A brief review of everything important about the Articles of Confederation that you need to know to succeed in APUSH. Weaknesses, positives, rebellions, and conventions are discussed in detail. Please visit www.apushreview.com for more videos and resources. Thanks for watching!
Views: 63304 Adam Norris
Timeline of drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution
 
23:35
The following is a timeline of the drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution. The drafting of the Constitution began on May 25, 1787, when the Constitutional Convention met for the first time with a quorum at the Pennsylvania State House (now Independence Hall) in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, and ended on September 17, 1787, the day the Constitution drafted by the convention's delegates to replace the Articles was adopted and signed. The ratification process for the Constitution began that day, and ended when the final state, Rhode Island, ratified it on May 29, 1790, three years later. In addition to key events during the Constitutional Convention and afterward while the Constitution was before the states for their ratification, important events that occurred during the run-up to the convention and during the nation's transition from government under the Articles of Confederation to government under the Constitution are also included, as is the unique ratification vote of Vermont. Thus this timeline begins on March 25, 1785, the date when the Mount Vernon Conference, a meeting of delegates from Virginia and Maryland to discuss interstate commercial issues along their mutual water border, convened, and ends on January 10, 1791, when Vermont, which at the time was a sovereign state, voted to ratify the Constitution and to apply for admission into the Union. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 426 Audiopedia
Timeline of drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) The following is a timeline of the drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution.The drafting of the Constitution began on May 25, 1787, when the Constitutional Convention met for the first time with a quorum at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, and ended on September 17, 1787, the day the Constitution drafted by the convention's delegates to replace the Articles was adopted and signed.The ratification process for the Constitution began that day, and ended when the final state, Rhode Island, ratified it on May 29, 1790, three years later.In addition to key events during the Constitutional Convention and afterward while the Constitution was before the states for their ratification, important events that occurred during the run-up to the convention and during the nation's transition from government under the Articles of Confederation to government under the Constitution are also included, as is the unique ratification vote of Vermont, which at the time was a sovereign state outside the Union. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Ssolbergj License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0) Author(s): Ssolbergj (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Ssolbergj) ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 161 WikiWikiup
Articles of Confederation
 
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Explains that the Americans feared a strong government, so they gave states power under Article of Confederation. However, the weaknesses of a confederal system led us to write the US Constitution.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 243 Caitlin Long
Articles of Confederation - 1777 - Hear and Read the First US Constitution
 
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Listen to and Read the Articles of Confederation, the 1st Constitution of the United States, approved by the Second Continental Congress in 1777 for the 13 original colonies. Narrator: Timelessreader1 Photographer: Timelessreader1 Text: The text of this U.S. constitution, approved in 1777, is in the Public Domain.
Views: 1735 TimelessReader1