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The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4090273 CrashCourse
The Articles of Confederation - Becoming the United States - Extra History - #1
 
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When the thirteen colonies of North America broke away from Great Britain, they struggled to draft their first constitution. After great debate, they created the Articles of Confederation and formed the United States of America. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 865729 Extra Credits
The Articles of Confederation - The Constitution Before the Constitution
 
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→Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 →How "Dick" came to be short for 'Richard': https://youtu.be/BH1NAwwKtcg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2Acy6g9Ta7hzC0Rr3RDS6q Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut The Nazis, The British Accent, and BBC News https://youtu.be/_hRQq5e7Wi0?list=PLR0XuDegDqP3-uys3Rl2dvdsFkk96zRbt The Truth About Double Jeopardy https://youtu.be/Tgjip92-ZMg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP0GESJ0DgpgTcThLJVEbFs8 In this video: For four hot, humid July days, 56 delegates of the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia with one purpose – to ratify the Declaration of Independence. The document, originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson with the help of Ben Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, ad Robert Livingston, declared that the thirteen American colonies were now independent and free of the tyranny of the British Empire. On July 4th, with the final wording in place, it was ready for the whole world to read; though, it would be about another month before congress would actually sign it, contrary to popular belief. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/12/articles-confederation-constitution-constitution/ Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Articles http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/artconf.asp http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Revolutionary_War http://books.google.com/books?id=pFXLAMC1xtUC&q=127#v=snippet&q=127&f=false http://www.cliffsnotes.com/more-subjects/american-government/the-constitution/the-articles-of-confederation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shays%27_Rebellion http://johncashon.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/shays-rebellion-and-the-articles-of-confederation/ http://huntingtonhomestead.org/birthdate.html
Views: 78306 Today I Found Out
The Articles of Confederation | Period 3: 1754-1800 | AP US History | Khan Academy
 
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Before the United States had the Constitution, it had the Articles of Confederation, a much weaker government that lasted from 1777 to 1789. In this video, Kim and Leah discuss the pros and cons of the Articles, and the reasons they were discarded in favor of a new Constitution. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-history/road-to-revolution/creating-a-nation/v/the-articles-of-confederation?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apushistory Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 68313 Khan Academy
What if We Kept the Articles of Confederation?
 
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An in-depth four part series about the Articles of Confederation from Extra Credits!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6rHSiN0vKk The United States used to be a lot less....united. The states originally wanted to control themselves, and that resulted in the failed Articles of Confederation. But what if we kept them? Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alternatehistoryhub/?ref=bookmarks Music by Holfix: https://www.youtube.com/user/holfix
Views: 546366 AlternateHistoryHub
US Economic History 2 — Interstate Commerce & the Constitution
 
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The Constitution’s Interstate Commerce clause was supposed to liberate American markets. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the second video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams, and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Know Your (Bill of) Rights (blog post): This blog post explains what rights each amendment of the Bill of Rights protects, as well as common threats to those rights today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/know-your-bill-of-rights/ The Original Purpose of the US Constitution - Learn Liberty (video): Professor Randy Barnett explains that the constitution was written to protect the rights of the people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiMOtS_lzZc Constitutional crisis or the Constitution at work? (blog post): Professor Lauren Hall explains how the constitution is being used to constrain President Trump’s powers today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/constitutional-crisis-or-the-constitution-at-work/ TRANSCRIPT: Brian Domitrovich: When the United States separated from Britain during the Revolutionary War, the first national government was established under the Articles of Confederation. The Articles created a minimal national government that had little ability to bend the will of the states towards the national interest. This limitation of federal authority became apparent when several states in the new nation became involved in trade disputes. In the years prior to the passage of the Constitution, in 1789, states routinely passed tariffs on each other. If a merchant in one state brought a good across a state border, the merchandise was subject to attacks, collectible by a customs agent. Tariffs caused ill will among the states as trade wars developed. Meanwhile, the national Congress was unable to get all the states to agree to a standard tariff on imported goods to raise tax revenue, and government was deeply in debt from the Revolutionary War and needed the revenue. The national government, under the Articles, could not do anything about these problems. Leaders became concerned that the tension could undo the union. Just before the Constitutional convention met in 1787, James Madison wrote a pamphlet called the Vices of the Political System. In that essay, he wrote that, "The practices of many states in restricting commercial intercourse with other states, and putting their productions and manufacturers on the same footing as with foreign nations. They're not contrary to the federal Articles. It's certainly a verse to the spirit of the union, and tends to beget retaliating regulations.… They are destructive of the general harmony.” This was one of the reasons some founders supported a new federal government that would replace the Articles of Confederation. And so it came to pass that the Constitution was ratified in 1789. Now one of the most significant new powers of the federal government under the Constitution was the power of Congress to regulate trade as outlined in Article I section 8 of the Constitution. The document specified that Congress had the power to "regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes." Furthermore, Congress, but not the states was also authorized to levy "taxes, duties, imposts, and excises." Upon ratification of the Constitution, states could no longer regulate trades among themselves, only Congress now had that authority, but even here the power was limited in that federal taxes had to be uniformed across all the states. Congress retained sole authority to regulate trade with other nations. Nonetheless, in future eras, including today, the commerce clause is used to justify almost any Congressional regulation of the economy, and many Congressional laws. This appears to be at variance with the narrow and define purpose of the commerce clause. Article I Section 8 at the time it was written. Its purpose was to end state tariffs and duties, to prevent in concert with other articles in the Constitution, Congress from discriminating against trade from any particular state, and to give Congress the sole power of imposing taxes on foreign goods. The development of a vast administrative and regulatory state in the 20th and now the 21st Century, came because Congress and the courts felt that the commerce clause of Article I Section 8 of the Constitution, could be interpreted much more broadly, than it initially was in the 1780s and 1790s. LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 12530 Learn Liberty
The Articles of Confederation
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy This video explores the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, the reasons it was deliberately weak, the powers under the confederation that were granted as well as the powers that were missing. The weaknesses are discussed with the effects they had on the ability to wage war against the British and solve the problems of the new country. While this video was designed for students taking the Florida End-of-Course exam, it will help any Civics or U.S. Government students. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
What Were the Articles of Confederation? | History
 
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Before the U.S. Constitution was the law of the land, there were the Articles of Confederation. Find out why they didn't last long. Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY/posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 64013 HISTORY
The Articles of Confederation Explained: U.S. History Review
 
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A review of our first Constitution, the AOC. What were the Articles of Confederation? How did it run the United States? Why did the Articles of Confederation fail? Mr. Hughes explains the basics of the Articles of Confederation including the reasons for its eventual demise. Check out the US Playlist for hundreds of videos! Now go subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesDV/featured
Views: 289424 Hip Hughes
Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United State’s didn’t always have its current system of government. Actually, this is it’s second attempt. Craig will delve into the failures (and few successes) of the Articles of Confederation, tell you how delegates settled on a two-house system of representation, discuss the issues of slavery and population that have been imbedded into our constitution, and fire up the clone machine to discuss how federalists and anti-federalist opposition provided the U.S. a Bill of Rights. And who knows, maybe all this talk of compromise will even inspire Craig and eagle to find some middle ground. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 946087 CrashCourse
From Articles of Confederation to the US Constitution
 
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After Americans won independence, they faced challenges that threatened the existence of their infant nation. These pressures motivated a change in government structure from the loose confederacy of states formed during the Revolutionary War under the Articles of Confederation to a more united nation under a new constitution. Saul Cornell addresses specific clauses of the United States Constitution shaped by the experience of the war and the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation. He closes with approaches in constitutional interpretation today.
Federalism: Crash Course Government and Politics #4
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1418222 CrashCourse
Economic Problems Under the Articles of Confederation
 
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Shays's Rebellion and Articles of Confederation
Views: 59674 John Mielke
2.3 Articles of Confederation
 
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The states first attempt to build a national government, the Articles of Confederation, proved too weak to last. Fraga, L. R. (2010). Origins of American Government. Holt McDougal United States Government: principles in practice ([Indiana ed., pp. 30-64). Austin, Tex.: Holt McDougal.
Views: 609 TheChairmansReport
What if the US kept the Articles of Confederation?
 
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The Articles of Confederation was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. Nevertheless, the weakness of the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, general government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government with a chief executive (the president), courts, and taxing powers. But what if they were never abolished? How would our world be different? Find out in the video. FOLLOW MY BLOG: http://trackmastertrain.blogspot.com/ LIKE COMMENT SUBSCRIBE :)
America under the Articles of Confederation HD
 
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Produced by the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution at James Madison's Montpelier. Featuring: * Colleen Sheehan: Professor of Political Science, Villanova University * David O. Stewart: Author of "The Summer of 1787" and "Madison's Gift" * Gene Hickok: Montpelier Foundation Board of Directors * Hank Chambers: Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law * Stewart Harris: Professor of Law, Appalachian School of Law To take the course, go to http://www.montpelier.org/courses.
Views: 1933 Robert H. Smith
The US Constitution - Breaking Down the Articles
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy The video is a quick overview of the sections or Articles of the US Constitution. Students will learn about Article I and it's establishing the powers and structure of the US Legislative Branch known as Congress. Article II establishes and outlines the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States. Article III established the Judicial Branch headed by the US Supreme Court. Article IV discusses the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments known as federalism. Article V establishes how to create amendments to the Constitution. Article VI is known as the "Supremacy Clause" which establishes that federal law is more powerful than state law. Article VII outlines the way the US Constitution was ratified. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
The Articles and the Constitution (US History EOC Review - USHC 1.4)
 
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http://www.tomrichey.net/eoc This lecture on the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution was designed specifically to help students who are reviewing for the South Carolina US History EOC (End of Course) exam but it has something to offer lifelong learners and other interested parties, as well. The Articles of Confederation were drawn up during the American Revolution creating a glorified military alliance with a weak central government in order to minimize the chances of tyranny. After the Revolution, a bad economy and Shays' Rebellion caused many elites to reconsider and advocate for a stronger central government. In 1787, the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia to create the United States Constitution, which created a stronger central government with additional power, such as the power to regulate interstate commerce. The Constitution was ratified after a contentious process which ended with the addition of a Bill of Rights to appease the Antifederalists. In the state of New York, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay wrote The Federalist Papers in order to answer objections to the proposed Constitution. This lecture is part of my EOC Review series and specifically addresses content found in USHC 1.4.
Views: 11745 Tom Richey
We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution
 
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In the years following the end of the American Revolution, the Continental Congress was on the brink of collapse due to the Articles of Confederation and its refusal to consider fundamental reform to the document. In professor George William Van Cleve’s book, We Have Not a Government, we encounter a sharply divided America and a Congress that grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Constitutional Convention to replace the Articles with a more flexible and powerful government. A book signing will follow the program. Live Captioning: https://www.streamtext.net/player?event=NATA17Oct23
Views: 1895 US National Archives
Weakness of the Articles of Confederation: An Overview
 
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Weakness of the Articles of Confederation: An Overview
Views: 8935 erilowe273
Problems with the Article of Confederation
 
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Problems: -Tax -Currency -Supreme Court -President -One Vote Issues: -Representation -State Rights vs. Central Government -Trusting Voters -Bill of Rights -Slavery
Views: 2166 Flipped History
Articles of Confederation vs. U.S. Constitution
 
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Learning Target: I can explain which of the following was most responsible for the success of America: George Washington or The United States Constitution.
Views: 21582 Mr. Wilson
APUSH Review: Video #14: State Constitutions And The Articles Of Confederation
 
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Why were the Articles of Confederation designed to be weak? What were positives and negatives under the Articles of Confederation? Find out here! If you would like to download the PowerPoint and/or a Video Guide for this video, click here: https://www.apushreview.com/period-3-videos-in-order/ All images are part of the public domain.
Views: 3588 Adam Norris
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United States didnt always have its current system of government. Actually, this is. John Green teaches you the history of the United States of America in 47 s! In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you.
Views: 265 hamza junco
Lessons Learned: The Articles of Confederation
 
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On March 1, 1781, the Articles of Confederation came into effect after Maryland became the thirteenth and final state to ratify them. As the first constitution for the new nation, The Articles established a national legislature but assigned it relatively little power. The individual colonies retained much of their sovereignty, and it soon became clear that such a weak federal government was ineffective. By 1787 the framers had begun writing a new constitution, the one that created the federal government Americans have today. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says that this episode in U.S. history points to the difficulty of creating a workable constitution. "It is easy to write a constitution," he says, but "hard to write a constitution that works." This lesson, he argues, should be kept in mind as countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Myanmar, and South Sudan "struggle to create effective and legitimate systems of government." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-articles-confederation/p27505
What Were the Articles of Confederation? | America: Facts vs. Fiction
 
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The Articles of Confederation proved to be more trouble than help with individual states all pushing their interests and agendas, to the point of threatening the country as a whole. | For more, visit http://military.discovery.com/tv-shows/america-facts-vs-fiction/#mkcpgn=ytmil1 Subscribe to Military Channel! | http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=militarychannel Watch full episodes! | https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/America_Facts_vs_Fiction?id=Sx4XncduJRc&hl=en
Views: 143623 American Heroes Channel
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
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Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 2609 Greatest AudioBooks
LIMITED GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTICLES of CONFEDERATION.avi
 
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There is a time from 1781 to 1789 our government had also excised each year a new president ( for a total of 7 presidents prior to George Washington). This was also a growing time for our nation. This is very important time for all to understand our constitution. To understand what the constitution was to do. While also limit the size of government. You must understand these articles before you can understand the job the constitution was to do. You may disagree, but it is like one who does not understand division and trying to do algebra. The algebra strength is a strong understanding of all basic math functions. SO IS IT SO WITH OUR CONSTITUTION!!! TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSTITUTION AND THE JOB IT MUST FOREFILL. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND HOW IT HAD FAILED. When it became apparent that government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, little more than the shadow without the substance, agitation for a stronger federal government began. This agitation resulted in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 and the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787, which drafted the Constitution of the United States from 1786 through 1789 is the time it took to make and have the Constitution of United States of America to become the supreme law of this nation. Actually if you consider the birth of the government of 1781 to 1789 is the actual time it took for you constitution to be developed. ________________________________________ The Articles of Confederation Agreed to by Congress November 15, 1777; ratified and in force, March 1, 1781. Preamble To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting. Whereas the Delegates of the United States of America in Congress assembled did on the fifteenth day of November in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy seven, and in the Second Year of the Independence of America, agree to certain articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, in the words following, viz: Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. ________________________________________ Article I. The Stile of this Confederacy shall be "The United States of America." ________________________________________ Article II. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every Power, Jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled. ________________________________________ Article III. The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever. ________________________________________ Article IV. The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce, subject to the same duties, impositions, and restrictions as the inhabitants thereof respectively, provided that such restrictions shall not extend so far as to prevent the removal of property imported into any State, to any other State, of which the owner is an inhabitant; provided also that no imposition, duties or restriction shall be laid by any State, on the property of the united States, or either of them. If any person guilty of, or charged with, treason, felony, or other high misdemeanor in any State, shall flee from justice, and be found in any of the united States, he shall, upon demand of the Governor or executive power of the State from which he fled, be delivered up and removed to the State having jurisdiction of his offense. . YES I JD IS A PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE FOR 2012 AND ALSO CHECKOUT www.theconstitutionistparty.com Thank you for your time Jd
Views: 1421 Jd Criveau
The Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and "Limited Government"
 
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Are your progressive friends correct to say the US Constitution is not a limited government document after all? Bill Watkins joins me to discuss both the Constitution and the Articles of Confederation, and what the light of history can tell us about each. Subscribe to the Tom Woods Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tom-woods-show/id716825890?mt=2 http://www.TomWoods.com/787 http://www.SupportingListeners.com http://www.RonPaulHomeschool.com http://www.FreeHistoryCourse.com
Views: 4267 TomWoodsTV
Articles of Confederation versus the Constitution (by Sheldon Richman)
 
01:24:06
Sheldon Richman lectures to students attending History and Liberty in Midland, MI in July of 2009. Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) http://www.fee.org/ Taken from: http://vimeo.com/8559865 POSTED WITH PERMISSION FROM SHELDON RICHMAN
The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance
 
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The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.
Views: 599 Traci Ross
Kinki Do you love me
 
00:16
Are you riding because....... Understanding the Articles of the United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States. The Constitution is made of the Preamble and seven different articles. Together, these articles are the foundation for how the United States government is organized. The Articles of the Constitution also explain how the federal government interacts with the citizens, states, and people of the country. Who Wrote the Articles of the Constitution? The Constitution and all of its Articles were written in 1787. Between May 1787 and September 1787, the group of men now known as the Framers met to talk about what should be included in the Articles of the United States Constitution. Because the current government under the Articles of Confederation did not work well, the framers hoped to create a better government. There were 55 Framers of the United States Constitution, included George Washington, James Madison, Ben Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and more. The Framers had many arguments and debates about what should be included in the Articles. They also made many speeches. After a lot of talking, they finally decided on all the details of the Constitution. When Were the Articles of the Constitution Ratified? The Constitution had to be ratified by at least nine states in order to become the law of the land. After two and a half years, all 13 states agreed to ratify the Articles of the Constitution. The Constitution and its Articles were adopted into the United States on September 17, 1787 during the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. What are the Articles of Articles of The Constitution? Together, the articles of the constitution work to establish the branches of the federal government and describe what powers they have. Article 1 of the Constitution Article 1 gives Congress its powers and limits. Congress is the branch of the government who can make laws for the country. Article 1 also creates the two sections of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives. Article 2 of the Constitution Article 2 of the Constitution makes the executive branch of the government. The Executive branch has the responsibility and authority for the administration on a daily basis. In the United States, the executive branch is made up of the President and executive officers. Article 3 of the Constitution Article 3 of the Constitution creates a judicial branch in the United States. The Judicial branch is the court system that interprets the law. In the United States, the judicial branch includes the Supreme Court and the lower courts which are made by Congress. Article 4 of the Constitution Article 4 of the Constitution talks about the states. Article 4 talks about what responsibilities and duties the states have along with what responsibilities the federal government has to each States. Article 5 of the Constitution Article 5 says that the only way the Constitution can be changed is by adding an amendment. Article 6 of the Constitution Article 6 says that any debts or engagements that the country had before adopting the Constitution are still valid. Article 6 also says that the Constitution is the highest law and that all officers and judges have to uphold the Constitution.
Views: 11 Mow My Lawn
The Constitution Song ("Despacito" Parody)
 
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Review the United States Constitution, Preamble and purpose, Articles and Amendments, all to the song of the summer, "Despacito." PrepIT for APUSH and AP GOV Link - http://bit.ly/PrepIT Support MrBettsClass on Patreon - http://bit.ly/PatreonMBC APUSH Shirt - http://bit.ly/MBCAPUSH Historical Parody/Skits every Thursday Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation They be giving us, such frustration, yeah Limits feel like strangulation, yeah Oh, we must meet up in Philadelphia Close the windows and lock the doors We the people of the US in order To form a more perfect Union, provide For the defense, see Justice ain’t denied Promote the general welfare of all our lives Oh, yeah, and to insure domestic Tranquility And to secure the Blessings of Liberty To ourselves and our Posterity (ordain this) Constitution Splitting up the government into three branches Executive, Judicial, and the Legislative Separating powers and insuring balance Constitution Building on the concepts of the Magna Carta Locke, Voltaire, and Baron Montesquieu are borrowed Still James Madison is called its father (What does, what does, what does, what does, it say) Article I’s about the Congress House and Senate They regulate and tax, declare war Writing laws with the elastic clause (Necessary and proper, baby) President and Executive fall under Article II III’s about the Judicial Branch Both of these parts are brand new Article IV’s about relation Between the states and nation V covers new amendments And their ratification VI is saying federal law will always be Supreme VII says to make this real nine states will have to agree Checks and balances ensure no branch is growing too strong The Court declares unconstitutional what it thinks is wrong If the law ain’t good, the President can veto Congress can override, impeach his seat too Federalists papers, 85 to make ya Want this Constitution, Publius’s a faker It’s really Hamilton, John Jay, and Madison Still there is one thing I can’t help feel is missing Oh yeah Constitution Will pass if we promise to have a Bill of Rights 10 Amendments, I could talk about them all night Wanna know them, click here, and you will be alright Constitution Delaware’s the first state to ratify New Hampshire is ninth, it’s now bonafide And the new plan takes effect nationwide (Huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah) A living document, it’s meant to adapt to the times 27 Amendments so far One repealed ‘cause it went too far (Prohibition, prohibition, baby) Representative democracy, ensures the people Are the real source of power And this country remains ours Constitution We the people wanted a more perfect Union Founding Fathers came up with this great solution Plan of government that we are still using Constitution
Views: 210999 MrBettsClass
Computer-Side Chat: Uniting for Independence
 
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A flipped notes lesson on why colonists united for independence and the first government in the new Unites States under the Articles of Confederation.
Views: 298 Thomas Brown
Articles of Confederation: AP Government
 
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In this screencast lecture, I cover our first government, the Articles of Confederation. Conceived as a way to decentralize power and prevent tyranny, the government ultimately proved to be too weak and emasculated to govern the country. Shays' Rebellion showed the weaknesses of the system, prompting leaders to call for a Constitutional Convention.
Views: 334 Paul Sargent
1.3 Articles of Confederation to the Constitutional Convention AP Gov
 
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From the Articles of Confederation to the framing of the Constitution
Views: 1514 Carey LaManna
Articles of Confederation - 1777 - Hear and Read the First US Constitution
 
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Listen to and Read the Articles of Confederation, the 1st Constitution of the United States, approved by the Second Continental Congress in 1777 for the 13 original colonies. Narrator: Timelessreader1 Photographer: Timelessreader1 Text: The text of this U.S. constitution, approved in 1777, is in the Public Domain.
Views: 1481 TimelessReader1
Articles of Confederation
 
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The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. Nevertheless, the weakness of the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, general government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government with a chief executive (the president), courts, and taxing powers. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 391 Audiopedia
ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION III.avi
 
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Article IX. The united States in congress assembled, shall have the sole and exclusive right and power of determining on peace and war, except in the cases mentioned in the sixth article — of sending and receiving ambassadors — entering into treaties and alliances, provided that no treaty of commerce shall be made whereby the legislative power of the respective States shall be restrained from imposing such imposts and duties on foreigners, as their own people are subjected to, or from prohibiting the exportation or importation of any species of goods or commodities whatsoever — of establishing rules for deciding in all cases, what captures on land or water shall be legal, and in what manner prizes taken by land or naval forces in the service of the United States shall be divided or appropriated — of granting letters of marque and reprisal in times of peace — appointing courts for the trial of piracies and felonies committed on the high seas and establishing courts for receiving and determining finally appeals in all cases of captures, provided that no member of Congress shall be appointed a judge of any of the said courts. The United States in Congress assembled shall also be the last resort on appeal in all disputes and differences now subsisting or that hereafter may arise between two or more States concerning boundary, jurisdiction or any other causes whatever; which authority shall always be exercised in the manner following. Whenever the legislative or executive authority or lawful agent of any State in controversy with another shall present a petition to Congress stating the matter in question and praying for a hearing, notice thereof shall be given by order of Congress to the legislative or executive authority of the other State in controversy, and a day assigned for the appearance of the parties by their lawful agents, who shall then be directed to appoint by joint consent, commissioners or judges to constitute a court for hearing and determining the matter in question: but if they cannot agree, Congress shall name three persons out of each of the United States, and from the list of such persons each party shall alternately strike out one, the petitioners beginning, until the number shall be reduced to thirteen; and from that number not less than seven, nor more than nine names as Congress shall direct, shall in the presence of Congress be drawn out by lot, and the persons whose names shall be so drawn or any five of them, shall be commissioners or judges, to hear and finally determine the controversy, so always as a major part of the judges who shall hear the cause shall agree in the determination: and if either party shall neglect to attend at the day appointed, without showing reasons, which Congress shall judge sufficient, or being present shall refuse to strike, the Congress shall proceed to nominate three persons out of each State, and the secretary of There is a time from 1781 to 1789 our government had also excised each year a new president ( for a total of 7 presidents prior to George Washington). This was also a growing time for our nation. This is very important time for all to understand our constitution. To understand what the constitution was to do. While also limit the size of government. You must understand these articles before you can understand the job the constitution was to do. You may disagree, but it is like one who does not understand division and trying to do algebra. The algebra strength is a strong understanding of all basic math functions. SO IS IT SO WITH OUR CONSTITUTION!!! TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSTITUTION AND THE JOB IT MUST FOREFILL. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND HOW IT HAD FAILED. When it became apparent that government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, little more than the shadow without the substance, agitation for a stronger federal government began. This agitation resulted in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 and the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787, which drafted the Constitution of the United States from 1786 through 1789 is the time it took to make and have the Constitution of United States of America to become the supreme law of this nation. Actually if you consider the birth of the government of 1781 to 1789 is the actual time it took for you constitution to be developed. BECAUSE IT IS SO LONG PLEASE GO TO http://www.usconstitution.net/articles.html AND THERE YOU CAN SEE THE REST OF THIS DOCUMENT JD
Views: 123 Jd Criveau
Subway Surfers
 
00:11
If your mom gave me hand job I would play zombies with her because Understanding the Articles of the United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States. The Constitution is made of the Preamble and seven different articles. Together, these articles are the foundation for how the United States government is organized. The Articles of the Constitution also explain how the federal government interacts with the citizens, states, and people of the country. Who Wrote the Articles of the Constitution? The Constitution and all of its Articles were written in 1787. Between May 1787 and September 1787, the group of men now known as the Framers met to talk about what should be included in the Articles of the United States Constitution. Because the current government under the Articles of Confederation did not work well, the framers hoped to create a better government. There were 55 Framers of the United States Constitution, included George Washington, James Madison, Ben Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and more. The Framers had many arguments and debates about what should be included in the Articles. They also made many speeches. After a lot of talking, they finally decided on all the details of the Constitution. When Were the Articles of the Constitution Ratified? The Constitution had to be ratified by at least nine states in order to become the law of the land. After two and a half years, all 13 states agreed to ratify the Articles of the Constitution. The Constitution and its Articles were adopted into the United States on September 17, 1787 during the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. What are the Articles of Articles of The Constitution? Together, the articles of the constitution work to establish the branches of the federal government and describe what powers they have. Article 1 of the Constitution Article 1 gives Congress its powers and limits. Congress is the branch of the government who can make laws for the country. Article 1 also creates the two sections of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives. Article 2 of the Constitution Article 2 of the Constitution makes the executive branch of the government. The Executive branch has the responsibility and authority for the administration on a daily basis. In the United States, the executive branch is made up of the President and executive officers. Article 3 of the Constitution Article 3 of the Constitution creates a judicial branch in the United States. The Judicial branch is the court system that interprets the law. In the United States, the judicial branch includes the Supreme Court and the lower courts which are made by Congress. Article 4 of the Constitution Article 4 of the Constitution talks about the states. Article 4 talks about what responsibilities and duties the states have along with what responsibilities the federal government has to each States. Article 5 of the Constitution Article 5 says that the only way the Constitution can be changed is by adding an amendment. Article 6 of the Constitution Article 6 says that any debts or engagements that the country had before adopting the Constitution are still valid. Article 6 also says that the Constitution is the highest law and that all officers and judges have to uphold the Constitution.
Views: 12 Mow My Lawn
Articles of Confederation #1
 
04:43
- Continental Congress - Loose confederation of autonomous states - No executive, nor judicial branch - Weak central government - Ratification
The Articles of Confederation Audiobook | Full Audiobook Ebook Librivox | President Trump USA
 
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More books at http://librivox.org and http://youtube.com/audiobooksfreeBringing you Librivox audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of the Articles of Confederation Audiobook. This free Articles of Confederation Audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free to download this Articles of Confederation Audiobook free audiobook here at the Constitution of the United States Audiobook audio Librivox page: http://librivox.org/us-historical-documents/ "articles of confederation" "the articles of confederation" "articles of confederation history" "article of confederation" "shays rebellion" "articles of confederation video" "articles of confederation constitution" "articles of the confederation" "the constitution" "articles of confederation song" "constitution" "articles of the constitution" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "articles of confederation vs constitution" "shays rebellion history channel" "articles of confederation history channel" "before the constitution" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "the articles of confederation: before the consti" "school house rock articles of confederation" "articles of confederation cartoon" "youtube articles of confederation" "the articles of confederation before the constit" "articals of confederation" "video articles of confederation" "the confederation and the constitution" "john adams articles of confederation" "articles of confederations" "articles of confederation before the constitutio" "the articles of the confederation" "articles confederation" "history of the constitution" "articles of conferderation" "articles of confederation vs. constitution" "articles of confederation school house rock" "articles of confederation schoolhouse rock" "articles of confederation and constitution" "video on the articles of confederation" "articles of constitution" "schoolhouse rock articles of confederation" "you tube articles of confederation" "confederate constitution" "weaknesses of the articles of confederation" "articles of confederation 1778" "problems with the articles of confederation" "failure of the articles of confederation" "youtube articles of confederation" "articles of confederation problems" "problems of the articles of confederation" "youtube" "articles of confederation in kid language" "the articles of confederation national congress" "articles of confederation youtube" "the problems of the articles of confederation" "congress 1786" "youtube articles" "problems with the confederation" "differences between the articles of confederatio" "you tube articles ofconfederation" "youtube/articles of confederation" "differences between virginia and massachusetts" "first three articles of the constitution" "college articles of confederation youtube" "annapolis meeting 1786" "shays rebellion 1787" "problems under the articles of confederation" "significance of shays rebellion" "article of confederation failures" "problems in the articles of confederation" "you tube speech on the articles of confederation" "talks on the articles of confederation" "all you need to know about the articles of confe" "everything you need to know about the articles o" "articles of confederation executive" "atricles of confederation" "compare articles of confederation to consitution" "articles of confederation video in ten minutes" "what did the articles of confederation changed" "articles of confederation movie" "hostage takeover of a courthouse" "articles of confederation meeting" "problems with article of confederation" "names of people that made it to government from" "judicial branch weak" "why did the articles of confederation fail" "articles of confederation in ten minutes" "why the articles of confederation failed" "articles of confederation in 10 minutes" "articles of confederation lecture" "why did articles of confederation fail" "why articles of confederation failed" "articles of confederation fail" "the articles of confederation in ten minutes" "us history regents" "the articles of confederation in 10 minutes" "how did the articles of confederation fail" "articles of confederation weaknesses" "american history regents" "the articles" "how did the articles of confederation changed fr" president trump
Views: 12827 audiobooksfree
Articles of Confederation: APUSH Review
 
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This lecture covers all the basics of The Articles of Confederation for U.S. History and Advanced Placement U.S. History students. It has been tailored to cover all the material required of the new APUSH exam. Key Terms Articles of Confederation Federalism John Dickinson Weaknesses of Articles of Confederation Northwest Ordinances Shays Rebellion Barbary Pirates Annapolis Convention
Views: 58759 JoczProductions
Articles of Confederation Song
 
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We wrote this song based on the Articles of Confederation. We explain what power it had, the problems it underwent, effects and causes. Articles of Confederation Lyrics: By: Tiffany Leung and Nicaella Chan Under the Articles of Confederation The congress was weak and so was the Nation Too little power led to frustration Only allowed to Declare war Make treaties Establish postal service Manage Indian affairs Maintain an army and navy Regulate weights and measures Coin and borrow money The rest of the power was left to the states Despite its limitations The Congress was not completely flawed Pass two very important laws The Land Ordinance of 1785 Allowed the Northwest Territory to divide Into townships 6 squares mile wide 36 sections inside The 16th section for education The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 Abolished slavery In the Northwest Territory Divided land not more than five Not less than three, politically The Northwest Ordinance was important Made new western lands as equal states Instead of subordinate colonies Which was very rare in history! BUT SOMETHING WAS WRONG SOMETHING WAS WRONG! PROBLEM ONE Congress had no power to raise taxes It had no power to regulate commerce States had all the power to tax tax tax And regulate trades trades trades -- OH NO! Without taxing power the Government was broke States wouldn't pay they thought it was a joke PROBLEM TWO To pay it's 40,000,000 dollar war debt Continental Congress issued paper money But the value was inflated It was underrated 40 dollar to one silver Dollar Creditors avoided debtors Who tried to pay with worthless money Hostility grew between these two groups PROBLEM THREE Each state exercised its sovereignty Tariff Wars! - What a catastrophe Charged rivals with tariffs An extra dollar for neighboring states PROBLEM FOUR It was like Europe nations here The Sovereign states would fight all year Jealousy and Quarreling among the states Mighty warfare broke out all day! PROBLEM FIVE Each state had different trade regulations Maddening the situation with foreign relations It was undeniable The Confederation wasn't reliable It had no power to back its agreements PROBLEM SIX No respect England and Spain waited gleefully They did not believe that a self-government Would work successfully PROBLEM SEVEN In Massachusetts Daniel shay led the way for Debt-ridden farmers struck by inflation Who couldn't pay for their plantations Refusing to go to debtor's prison Or Losing their farm to creditors A group of farmers Took up arms and went against the courts! Shay's Rebellion of 1787 worried leaders like George Washington It called for a new constitution! 1781-1788 was the ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION it failed it failed! Bt we needed some form of government. A stepping-stone to the U.S constitution!
Views: 22777 Tiffany Leung
Weaknesses of Articles of Confederation
 
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A quick review of the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and how the US Constitution fixed those weaknesses.
Views: 2551 Steven Morrow
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
01:22:39
Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 7 jnsnailmail
The Articles of Confederation Rap
 
04:42
Project for Mrs. Martiak's pd. 5/6 Honors US I class. Lyrics: -John- Yo continental congress in the house We got a problem right now, 13 new states, don't got time for any more debates We need some articles, and confederate whaaaatt This federal government can't have too much power Gotta make it weak so there's no need to cower Gotta give strength to these sovereign states No executive branch is what this dictates We don't want a king, we don't want a ruler A firm league of friendship is so much cooler Congress makes decisions, yeah we take votes 1 vote per state yeah you better take notes On major issues you need two-thirds Unanimous for amendments, remember these words Hold on wait a second, some states getting mad We got some problems with this western land Beyond the alleghany mountains, virginia got it all Makin the other states feelin real small No big deal we got a solution We'll cede it all to congress in this constitution! -Luke- Oh, i'm sorry, what was that? I wasn't listening All that nonsense you just spewed made my skin start blistering 1 vote per state? Unicameral, thanks a lot Population: 3 million, 13 to call the shots? Why don't you base the votes on population Rep the nation in Congregation Maybe you'll pass some Legislation Stop delaying the Situation And what's all this unanimous biz Articles got problems, can't handle it? 13 states gotta vote for a lil'amendment? Sorry man, makin' laws gotta be more legit And where's the president to tie us together? Gotta keep our country's forecast sayin' good weather Forgot about that in your stupid little letter Right now the future's dark and cold, i think i need a sweater No judicial branch either? What didn't you forget? Congress isn't kept in check and it's makin' me upset Oh, what? Verse two? Yeah, i ain't done with you I got a problem with states too Makes my face turn red and blue Give the power to the states, the less the feds get to say How you in control if they ignore you all day? By the way Forget about the debt we just racked up? How you makin' bank when you can't collect tax-es? Currency too, what the heck's wrong with you? Each state's got their own coin, one-pence and two They can't trade with each other, no money to you That's what you get for making them "sovereign", fool! That federal currency's practically worthless All these nations out to get us, you better be nervous Speakin' of them, where's our army and navy? Oh right, congress can't raise 'em either, i'm gettin' lazy Can't defend the country if someone attacks us Can't defend our ships while pirates jack us Can't fight back when other countries placin' tar-iffs No power to the feds, on the heads they're gonna smack us You gave all the power to the states! You're not able to negotiate! You ceded all this land and britain's standing at our gates! I'm goin' crazy like norman bates! The point is your central government's weak You got no structure, the future's lookin bleak I know i've been on a bit of a nasty streak But keep that league of friendship and your country's gonna reek -Lenny- Yo man what you hatin' on the articles for? Look at what they've done for the country and more Without them there would be no federal constitution Political anarchy and mass confusion They helped settle claims over the old northwest Man, these land ordinances were the best 1785 divide the land Sell for income, for the debts at hand 6 by 6, and 1 by 1 Dividing these townships was a lot of fun During the day, when the kids needed schooling The 16th block was a school, for the little minds' fueling Now we're onto 1787 Turning colonies to states, like 13 heavens Appoint governors and judges for the pre-states In case of political or legal de-bates 5,000 votes to elect legislation And then 60,000 people for a state in the nation As you can see, the articles were great They may have had their weak points, but now we're the united states *lyrics not in video* They outlined the powers of the central government Such as treaties and postal ser-vi-ces They held the states together, during these times It wasn't the strongest, but it had reason and rhyme
Views: 4749 John Lerman
Articles of Confederation Explained in 10 Minutes
 
05:35
A video lecture on the Articles designed for US History students taking the NY state regents. Vintage HHH. The old school stuff where resolution was a bowling score.
Views: 30902 Hip Hughes

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