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Introduction to Price Discrimination
 
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Price discrimination is common: movie theaters charge seniors less money than they charge young adults. Computer software companies sell to businesses and students at different rates, often offering discounts to students. These price differences reflect variations in the elasticity of demand for these different groups. When demand curves are different, it is more profitable to set different prices in different markets. We’ll also cover arbitrage and take a look at some examples of price discrimination in the airline industry Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1oBdjav Next video: http://bit.ly/1R1JmqZ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GZR8/
Micro 4.8 Price Discriminating Monopoly (First Degree)
 
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Mr. Clifford's explains how to draw a monopoly with first degree price discrimination. Try pausing the video to see if you can show price, consumer surplus, and profit on the graph. Please keep in mind that these clips are not designed to teach you the key concepts. These videos are a review tool to help you better understand what you learned in class. ACDC is Mr. Clifford's teaching philosophy: Active Learning Cooperative Learning Discovery Learning Community
Views: 252383 Jacob Clifford
Price Discrimination: Block Pricing
 
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This video, which uses calculus, shows how to maximize profit when using a block-pricing strategy.
Views: 17611 1sportingclays
Y2/IB 20) Price Discrimination - First, Second and Third Degree
 
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A2/IB 20) Price Discrimination - First, Second and Third Degree - How do monopoly firms price discriminate? A look at the different degrees of price discrimination and why they can occur
Views: 152746 EconplusDal
Price discrimination
 
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Price discrimination is used to help firms maximise their profits. It is a very common pricing strategy, especially for utility companies, including electricity and gas suppliers, as well as transport companies.
Views: 37517 Economics Online
Economics of the Two-Part Tariff or Two-part Pricing Strategy
 
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This videos provides a numerical example of the two-part pricing strategy found in many microeconomics and managerial economics textbooks. Two-part tariff with different consumers is here:https://youtu.be/tmxscNxBLUs
Views: 74809 1sportingclays
A2 Economics: Pricing Strategies in 2 mins
 
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For more info please visit: www.a2withkomilla.blogspot.com. In this video I explore what are the various pricing strategies (cost-plus pricing, price discrimination, predatory (destroyer) pricing, limit pricing, price skimming and penetration pricing. I look at some of the benefits and costs of these strategies and what are the diagrams used to shows them. This video is created and presented by Komilla Chadha.
Views: 24269 Komilla Chadha
First Degree Price Discrimination and its Effect on Efficiency in a Monopolistic Market
 
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This lesson will define price discrimination, outline the conditions necessary for it to occur, and explain the different degrees of price discrimination. We will then illustrate the effect of perfect price discrimination and attempt to conclude whether or not it is good overall for society by looking at the effect it has on consumers and producers. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 107632 Jason Welker
Bundling for Higher Profit
 
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Selling goods in a bundle could increase sellers' profit under certain demand and cost conditions. Contents for http://livingecon.org bundling02_kuaiban02.mp4
Views: 15283 KK Fung
2nd Degree Price Discrimination
 
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This topic video looks at 2nd degree price discrimination - a pricing strategy for example that involves price varying by quantity sold e.g. bulk purchase discounts and also prices varying by time of purchase e.g. peak-time prices and off-peak prices. For more help with your A Level / IB Economics, visit tutor2u Economics http://www.tutor2u.net/economics If you find this topic video helpful, please SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel For more help with Economics: Follow tutor2u Economics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tutor2uEcon https://twitter.com/tutor2uGeoff - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 14953 tutor2u
Apple's Pricing
 
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Rettinger's Rants: Apple's Pricing Get 30% off at ShutterStock: http://www.shutterstock.com (Promo Code: TECHNO11) Jon R is back with an all new show where he rants and raves on various topics in and out of the tech world. On this week's episode, Jon touches upon the hot topic of Apple's pricing.. or rather, "over-pricing" as some would say. In addition to providing his thoughts on Apple's premium prices, he also shares some business insight as to why iPads, iPhones, iMacs and so on are priced the way they are. All this and more in this episode of Rants! http://tchno.be/Tu4JrP
Views: 105526 Jon Rettinger
Two Part-Tariff with Different Consumers
 
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The two-part tariff pricing strategy is shown when consumers have different demand curves. The two-part tariff with one consumer is discussed here: https://youtu.be/NBg_qqZ3l-8
Views: 4991 1sportingclays
Pricing Strategies: Dynamic Pricing
 
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In this short revision video we explain the concept of dynamic pricing. Dynamic pricing is a pricing strategy in which businesses set flexible prices for products or services based on current market demands. The aim of dynamic pricing is to allow a business that sells goods or services online and/or via mobile apps to adjust selling prices on the fly in response to changing market demand.
Views: 6777 tutor2u
How Airlines Price Flights
 
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Get 3 free meals from Blue Apron at http://cook.ba/2CdixUK Subscribe to Half as Interesting (The other channel from Wendover Productions): https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Check out my podcast with Brian from Real Engineering: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/showmakers/id1224583218?mt=2 (iTunes link) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_10vJJqf2ZK0lWrb5BXAPg (YouTube link) Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Get a Wendover Productions t-shirt for $20: https://store.dftba.com/products/wendover-productions-shirt Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: [email protected] Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington (https://www.youtube.com/heliosphere) Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Joe Cieplinski (http://joecieplinski.com/) Music: “Back Vibes Rollin at 5” by Kevin MacLeod, “Not for Nothing” by Otis McDonald, “Cold Funk Funkorama” by Kevin MacLeod, “It's Always Too Late To Start Over” by Chris Zabriskie, and “The Big Score” by MK2 American A321, Air Canada Q400 footage courtesy PDX Aviation Big thanks to Patreon supporters: M, Pete, Ken Lee, Victor Zimmer, Paul Jihoon Choi, Dylan Benson, Etienne Deschamps, Donald, Chris Allen, Abil Abdulla, Anson Leng, John & Becki Johnston, Connor J Smith, Arkadiy Kulev, Hagai Bloch Gabot, William Chappell, Eyal Matsliah, Joseph Bull, Marcelo Alves Vieira, Hank Green, Plinio Correa, Brady Bellini
Views: 1694452 Wendover Productions
Price Discrimination In Hindi कीमत विभेदीकरण क्या है
 
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The term “Price Discrimination” is also known as differential Pricing, Preferential Pricing, Dual Pricing, tiered Pricing, or Menu Pricing etc. What is “Price Discrimination” Price discrimination is a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service. The difference in the product may be on the basis of brand, wrapper etc. This policy of the monopolist is called price discrimination. Definitions: “Price discrimination exists when the same product is sold at different prices to different buyers.” –Koutsoyiannis “Price discrimination refers to the sale of technically similar products at prices which are not proportional to their marginal cost.” -Stigler “Price discrimination is the act of selling the same article produced under single control at a different price to the different buyers.” -Mrs. Joan Robinson “Price discrimination refers strictly to the practice by a seller of charging different prices from different buyers for the same good.” -J.S. Bain “Discriminating monopoly means charging different rates from different customers for the same good or service.” -Dooley Types of Discriminating Monopoly: Price discrimination is of following three types: 1. Personal Price Discrimination: Personal price discrimination refers to the charging of different prices from different customers for the same product. For example, an advocate charges different fees for the same service from rich and poor client. 2. Geographical Price Discrimination: Under geographical price discrimination, the monopolist charges different prices in different markets for the same product. It also includes dumping where a producer may sell the same commodity at one price at home and at the other price abroad. 3. Price Discrimination according to Use: When the monopolist charges different prices for the different uses of the same commodity is called the price discrimination according to use. Degree of Price Discrimination: Prof. A.C. Pigou has given the following three degrees of discriminating monopoly: 1. Price Discrimination of First Degree: Price discrimination of first degree is said to exist when the monopolist is able to sell each separate unit of his product at different prices. It is also known as the perfect price discrimination. In case of first degree price discrimination, a seller charges a price equal to what the consumer is willing to pay. It means the seller leaves no consumer’s surplus with the consumer. Apart from above, under perfect price discrimination the demand curve of the buyer, like under simple monopoly, becomes the marginal revenue curve of the seller. 2. Price Discrimination of Second Degree: In the price discrimination of second degree buyers are divided into different groups and from different groups a different price is charged which is the lowest demand price of that group. This type of price discrimination would occur if each individual buyer had a perfectly in- elastic demand curve for good below and above a certain price. 3. Price Discrimination of Third Degree: Price discrimination of third degree is said to exist when the seller divides his buyers into two or more than two sub markets and from each group a different price is charged. The price charged in each sub-market depends on the output sold in that sub-market along with demand conditions of that sub-market. In the real world, it is the third degree price discrimination which exists. 4. Legal Sanction: In some cases price discrimination is legally sanctioned. As, Electricity Board charges lowest for electricity for domestic use and highest for commercial houses. 5. Monopoly Existence: Price discrimination is also called discrimination monopoly. It is evident that price discrimination is possible only under conditions of monopoly.
Views: 8432 Know Economics
Price Discrimination - Peak Load Pricing
 
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Price Discrimination is the practice of charging different customers different prices for the same product or service. This film explores some of the ways companies do this As a result of watching this programme you should be able to: - Understand the meaning of the following terms: price discrimination, arbitrage, peak load pricing. - Be aware of the circumstances under which price discrimination is possible for firms. - Appreciate the problems of defining what is meant by price discrimination. - Assess the extent to which price discrimination is beneficial or harmful to society.
Views: 2517 StreamLearn
Pricing Strategies
 
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Economies of Scale: https://youtu.be/gckmLtA4kwc Different pricing strategies. Premium pricing. Price Skimming. Penetration pricing. Everyday low pricing(EDLP) High-Low Pricing Strategy.
Views: 3774 FST Study
Pricing Strategy Examples
 
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http://www.lifecycle-performance-pros.com. This video illustrates four common pricing structures for growing your business and maximizing profits. pricing strategies, competitive pricing, cost based pricing, pricing structures, price structure, price skimming, value pricing, company pricing, different pricing strategies, bundle pricing, pricing modelshttp://www.lifecycle-performance-pros.com
Views: 24573 Holman Victor
Business Objectives and Pricing Strategies
 
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​In this short revision video we look at a range of business objectives and how they affect the price that might be charged to consumers. Key revision points: Objectives often driven by managerial motives Interdependent behaviour in an oligopoly - firms must consider the likely reactions of rivals Most businesses are satisficers rather than maximisers Regulatory interventions do matter e.g. price capping More firms now use big data to drive revenues Consumers are increasingly sensitive to issues surrounding fair / ethical pricing
Views: 8117 tutor2u
What is PRICE DISCRIMINATION? What does PRICE DISCRIMINATION mean? PRICE DISCRIMINATION meaning
 
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What is PRICE DISCRIMINATION? What does PRICE DISCRIMINATION mean? PRICE DISCRIMINATION meaning - PRICE DISCRIMINATION definition - PRICE DISCRIMINATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Price discrimination is a microeconomic pricing strategy where identical or largely similar goods or services are transacted at different prices by the same provider in different markets. Price differentiation is distinguished from product differentiation by the more substantial difference in production cost for the differently priced products involved in the latter strategy. Price differentiation essentially relies on the variation in the customers' willingness to pay and in the elasticity of their demand. The term differential pricing is also used to describe the practice of charging different prices to different buyers for the same quality and quantity of a product, but it can also refer to a combination of price differentiation and product differentiation. Other terms used to refer to price discrimination include equity pricing, preferential pricing, and tiered pricing. Within the broader domain of price differentiation, a commonly accepted classification dating to the 1920s is: 1. Personalized pricing (or first-degree price differentiation) — selling to each customer at a different price; this is also called one-to-one marketing. The optimal incarnation of this is called perfect price discrimination and maximizes the price that each customer is willing to pay. 2. Product versioning or simply versioning (or second-degree price differentiation) — offering a product line by creating slightly different products for the purpose of price differentiation, i.e. a vertical product line. Another name given to versioning is menu pricing. 3. Group pricing (or third-degree price differentiation) — dividing the market in segments and charging the same price for everyone in each segment This is essentially a heuristic approximation that simplifies the problem in face of the difficulties with personalized pricing. Typical examples include student discounts and seniors' discounts. In a theoretical market with perfect information, perfect substitutes, and no transaction costs or prohibition on secondary exchange (or re-selling) to prevent arbitrage, price discrimination can only be a feature of monopolistic and oligopolistic markets, where market power can be exercised. Otherwise, the moment the seller tries to sell the same good at different prices, the buyer at the lower price can arbitrage by selling to the consumer buying at the higher price but with a tiny discount. However, product heterogeneity, market frictions or high fixed costs (which make marginal-cost pricing unsustainable in the long run) can allow for some degree of differential pricing to different consumers, even in fully competitive retail or industrial markets. The effects of price discrimination on social efficiency are unclear. Output can be expanded when price discrimination is very efficient. Even if output remains constant, price discrimination can reduce efficiency by misallocating output among consumers. Price discrimination requires market segmentation and some means to discourage discount customers from becoming resellers and, by extension, competitors. This usually entails using one or more means of preventing any resale: keeping the different price groups separate, making price comparisons difficult, or restricting pricing information. The boundary set up by the marketer to keep segments separate is referred to as a rate fence. Price discrimination is thus very common in services where resale is not possible; an example is student discounts at museums: In theory, students, for their condition as students, may get lower prices than the rest of the population for a certain product or service, and later will not become resellers, since what they received, may only be used or consumed by them. Another example of price discrimination is intellectual property, enforced by law and by technology. In the market for DVDs, laws require DVD players to be designed and produced with hardware or software that prevents inexpensive copying or playing of content purchased legally elsewhere in the world at a lower price.
Views: 2804 The Audiopedia
The science behind airfare pricing
 
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Airline fares often seem random, but Richard Quest is on a mission to discover the truth behind airfares.
Views: 638479 CNN
Bundling
 
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Bundling refers to when two or more goods are sold together as a package. Microsoft Office, Cable TV, Lexis-Nexis, and Spotify all provide examples of bundling. What if there were no bundling and you had to pay for Cable TV by channel rather than purchasing channels in bundles? Would you end up paying more or less? We explore this question and others in this video. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1S1vhil Next video: http://bit.ly/1TG9Swb Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GZRb/
Price discrimination in economics
 
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Eaisy economics
Views: 15874 Easy Economics
Simple Pricing Strategy
 
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Views: 580 msteck1
Chapter 14 : Indirect Price Discrimination
 
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Chapter 14 Video Lecture Managerial Economics: A Problem Solving Approach by Luke Froeb, Brian McCann Summary of Main Points Chapter 14 -- When a seller cannot identify low- and high-value consumers or cannot prevent arbitrage between two groups, it can still discriminate, but only indirectly, by designing products or services that appeal to groups with different price elasticities of demand, who identify themselves based on their purchasing behavior. -- Metering is a type of indirect discrimination that identifies high-value consumers by how intensely they use a product (e.g., by how many cartridges they buy). In this case, charge a big markup on the cartridges and a lower markup on the printer. -- If you offer a low-value product that is attractive to high-value consumers, you may cannibalize sales of your high-price product. -- When pricing for an individual customer, do not bargain over unit price. Instead, you should -- Offer volume discounts; -- Use two-part pricing; or -- Offer a bundle containing a number of units. -- Bundling different goods together can allow a seller to extract more consumer surplus if willingness to pay for the bundle is more homogeneous than willingness to pay for the separate items in the bundle.
Views: 12300 LukeFroeb
oligopolistic pricing strategies
 
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Explanation of oligopolistic pricing strategies similar to the Unit 8 assignment in microeconomics.
Bundling Strategies 1
 
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First part of bundling strategies lecture.
Views: 2536 Trevor Roycroft
pricing strategies
 
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Pricing Strategy Definition Example Penetration Pricing Here the organisation sets a low price to increase sales and market share. Once market share has been captured the firm may well then increase their price. A television satellite company sets a low price to get subscribers then increases the price as their customer base increases. Skimming Pricing The organisation sets an initial high price and then slowly lowers the price to make the product available to a wider market. The objective is to skim profits of the market layer by layer. A games console company reduces the price of their console over 5 years, charging a premium at launch and lowest price near the end of its life cycle. Competition Pricing Setting a price in comparison with competitors. Really a firm has three options and these are to price lower, price the same or price higher Some firms offer a price matching service to match what their competitors are offering. Product Line Pricing Pricing different products within the same product range at different price points. An example would be a DVD manufacturer offering different DVD recorders with different features at different prices eg A HD and non HD version.. The greater the features and the benefit obtained the greater the consumer will pay. This form of price discrimination assists the company in maximising turnover and profits. Bundle Pricing The organisation bundles a group of products at a reduced price. Common methods are buy one and get one free promotions or BOGOF's as they are now known. Within the UK some firms are now moving into the realms of buy one get two free can we call this BOGTF i wonder? This strategy is very popular with supermarkets who often offer BOGOF strategies. Psychological Pricing The seller here will consider the psychology of price and the positioning of price within the market place The seller will therefore charge 99p instead £1 or $199 instead of $200. The reason why this methods work, is because buyers will still say they purchased their product under £200 pounds or dollars, even thought it was a pound or dollar away. My favourite pricing strategy. Premium Pricing The price set is high to reflect the exclusiveness of the product. An example of products using this strategy would be Harrods, first class airline services, Porsche etc. Optional Pricing The organisation sells optional extras along with the product to maximise its turnover. T This strategy is used commonly within the car industry as i found out when purchasing my car. Cost Based Pricing The firms takes into account the cost of production and distribution, they then decide on a mark up which they would like for profit to come to their final pricing decision. If a firm operates in a very volatile industry, where costs are changing regularly no set price can be set, therefore the firm will decide on their mark up to confirm their pricing decision. Cost Plus Pricing Here the firm add a percentage to costs as profit margin to come to their final pricing decisions. For example it may cost £100 to produce a widget and the firm add 20% as a profit margin so the selling price would be £120.00 4ps marketing mix brand marketing strategy brand strategies brand strategy branding marketing strategy branding strategies branding strategy business and strategy business level strategy business plan pricing strategy example business strategies business strategy business strategy examples business strategy model business strategy template by product pricing strategy communication strategy communications strategy example marketing strategy example of a marketing strategy example of marketing plan example of marketing strategy example of pricing strategy examples of marketing strategies examples of marketing strategy examples of pricing strategies hotel marketing plan marketing and sales strategies marketing and sales strategy marketing communication strategy marketing communications marketing communications strategy marketing mix marketing plan marketing plan example
Views: 4073 Mr. Advertiser
Maximizing Profit Under Monopoly
 
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AIDS has killed more than 36 million people worldwide. There are drugs available to treat AIDS, but the price of one pill is incredibly high in the U.S. — coming in at 25 times higher than its cost. Why is that? In this video, we show how patent rights have created a monopoly in the U.S. market for AIDS medication, causing pills to be very expensive. In other countries, however, such as India, which does not recognize patents on AIDS medication, prices remain low. Using this example, we go over how monopolies use market power to increase prices. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1S1xKt8 Next video: http://bit.ly/21rj3C7 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GSLJ/
Chapter 13 - Direct Price Discrimination
 
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Chapter 13 Video Lecture Managerial Economics: A Problem Solving Approach by Luke Froeb, Brian McCann Summary of Main Points Chapter 13 -- If a seller can identify two groups of consumers with different demand elasticities, and it can prevent arbitrage between two groups, it can increase profit by charging a higher price to the low-elasticity group. -- Price discrimination is the practice of charging different people or groups of people different prices that are not cost-justified. Typically more people are served under price discrimination than under a uniform price. -- Arbitrage can defeat a price discrimination scheme if enough of those who purchase at low prices re-sell to high-value consumers. This can force a seller to go back to a uniform price. -- A direct price discrimination scheme is one in which we can identify members of the low value group, charge them a lower price, and prevent them from re-selling their lower priced goods to the higher-value group. It can be illegal for business to price discriminate when selling goods (not services) to other businesses unless -- price discounts are cost-justified, or -- discounts are offered to meet competitors' prices. -- Price discrimination schemes may annoy customers who know they're paying more than others and can make them less willing to buy because they know someone else is getting abetter price. If you can, keep them secret.
Views: 10268 LukeFroeb
Monopolist Equilibrium Under Price Discrimination कीमत विभेदीकरण के अंतर्गत एकाधिकारी का संतुलन
 
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https://amzn.to/2sxvbrs Price Discrimination In Hindi कीमत विभेदीकरण क्या है https://youtu.be/NeYl26EpJyU The term “Price Discrimination” is also known as differential Pricing, Preferential Pricing, Dual Pricing, tiered Pricing, or Menu Pricing etc. What is “Price Discrimination” Price discrimination is a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service. The difference in the product may be on the basis of brand, wrapper etc. This policy of the monopolist is called price discrimination. Definitions: “Price discrimination exists when the same product is sold at different prices to different buyers.” –Koutsoyiannis “Price discrimination refers to the sale of technically similar products at prices which are not proportional to their marginal cost.” -Stigler “Price discrimination is the act of selling the same article produced under single control at a different price to the different buyers.” -Mrs. Joan Robinson “Price discrimination refers strictly to the practice by a seller of charging different prices from different buyers for the same good.” -J.S. Bain “Discriminating monopoly means charging different rates from different customers for the same good or service.” -Dooley Types of Discriminating Monopoly: Price discrimination is of following three types: 1. Personal Price Discrimination: Personal price discrimination refers to the charging of different prices from different customers for the same product. For example, an advocate charges different fees for the same service from rich and poor client. 2. Geographical Price Discrimination: Under geographical price discrimination, the monopolist charges different prices in different markets for the same product. It also includes dumping where a producer may sell the same commodity at one price at home and at the other price abroad. 3. Price Discrimination according to Use: When the monopolist charges different prices for the different uses of the same commodity is called the price discrimination according to use. Degree of Price Discrimination: Prof. A.C. Pigou has given the following three degrees of discriminating monopoly: 1. Price Discrimination of First Degree: Price discrimination of first degree is said to exist when the monopolist is able to sell each separate unit of his product at different prices. It is also known as the perfect price discrimination. In case of first degree price discrimination, a seller charges a price equal to what the consumer is willing to pay. It means the seller leaves no consumer’s surplus with the consumer. Apart from above, under perfect price discrimination the demand curve of the buyer, like under simple monopoly, becomes the marginal revenue curve of the seller. 2. Price Discrimination of Second Degree: In the price discrimination of second degree buyers are divided into different groups and from different groups a different price is charged which is the lowest demand price of that group. This type of price discrimination would occur if each individual buyer had a perfectly in- elastic demand curve for good below and above a certain price. 3. Price Discrimination of Third Degree: Price discrimination of third degree is said to exist when the seller divides his buyers into two or more than two sub markets and from each group a different price is charged. The price charged in each sub-market depends on the output sold in that sub-market along with demand conditions of that sub-market. In the real world, it is the third degree price discrimination which exists. 4. Legal Sanction: In some cases price discrimination is legally sanctioned. As, Electricity Board charges lowest for electricity for domestic use and highest for commercial houses. 5. Monopoly Existence: Price discrimination is also called discrimination monopoly. It is evident that price discrimination is possible only under conditions of monopoly.
Views: 4198 Know Economics
Pricing Strategy
 
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Views: 57 blaine amante
PRICING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 1 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
 
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PRICING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 1 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
Views: 1220 Shashi Aggarwal
Second Degree Price Discrimniation
 
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When sellers charge different prices to different consumers based on the quantity bought, they are practicing second degree price discrimination. This video introduces the graphical analysis of and outlines the consequences of second degree price discrimniation Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 26860 Jason Welker
Managerial Economics - Two Part Pricing
 
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When you have identical customers with a constant marginal cost you can solve for the optimal two - part pricing fixed fee and per unit cost.
Views: 11020 Luke Bessey
PRICING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 2-PRICING METHODS
 
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PRICING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 2-PRICING METHODS MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS/MARKETING MGMT.
Views: 621 Shashi Aggarwal
Engage3 Strategic Pricing: Comprehensive Visibility
 
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Some large U. S. retailers are making their price adjustments based on a single competitor location in a region. "This is not a very good way to get your pricing right for your customers," Lyle Walker, VP of Strategic Enablement at Engage3, says. "Without adding to existing competitive shop budgets, we can give you a window into your competitors' reaction to new prices. We can track this over time and measure it, and then report against it," he added. Watch Lyle talk about what it takes to have comprehensive competitive pricing visibility in your market.
Views: 141 Engage3
Price Discrimination and its types- First, Second and Third degree Price Discrimination
 
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Price Discrimination and its type. Pricing strategy.
Views: 544 CA Simplified
PEAK LOAD PRICING - PRICING  THEORY ||MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS||COMMERCE& MANAGEMENT
 
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Views: 360 ALL ABOUT UGC NET
Apple's 2019 pricing strategy is failing. Here's why
 
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Here's a rough analysis on why Apple's pricing strategy has been failing lately. Apple has cut prices of phones soon after launch and is estimated to report its lowest iPhones sales in the past 7 years. A lot of thought goes in pricing a product and several factors have a say. From psychology to competition to pricing to inflation, Apple always analyses the market thoroughly before getting a number and they almost always get it right. Not this time. Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AspectEquity Check out polymatter's channel for similar content https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgNg3vwj3xt7QOrcIDaHdFg
Views: 1909 Aspect Equity
A Unique Kickstarter Pricing Strategy
 
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Learn more about Leadpages: http://www.crowdcrux.com/leadpages Subscribe: http://www.crowdcrux.com/youtube I'm going to share a unique Kickstarter pricing strategy with you so that you can accurately price your products and not under or over charge your backers. This is one technique that other entrepreneurs have used to nail down the price before they bring the product to market. ------------------------------------------ Connect with Sal ------------------------------------------ My books: http://amzn.to/2wk3w0n LinkedIn: in/Briggman Twitter: @sbriggman Insta: @sbriggy or @crowdcrux ------------------------------------------ Connect w/ the Community ------------------------------------------ Blog: http://www.crowdcrux.com Forum: http://www.kickstarterforum.org Podcast: http://www.crowdcrux.com/itunes S
Views: 504 Salvador Briggman
How To Turn Online Data Into a Pricing Strategy That Works
 
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Recent Wharton research examines how retailers can use online data to create effective pricing policies. More: http://knlg.net/2iFse5x
Views: 1039 KnowledgeAtWharton
Pricing Strategies No. 8
 
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Win More Listings! Much of your success begins with how you present the subject of pricing to your prospective home sellers as well as how you price each property. In this brand-new Pricing Strategies video series, two real estate industry icons, Allan Dalton (Mr. Say) and Gino Blefari (Mr. Do) share their experience, knowledge, wisdom, and the most appropriate language to help you win more listings. Entire Pricing Strategies series: Pricing Strategies No. 1 https://youtu.be/BDxEqvfKSeM Pricing Strategies No. 2 https://youtu.be/ht1hmFir6JQ Pricing Strategies No. 3 https://youtu.be/1gON59DmnY4 Pricing Strategies No. 4 https://youtu.be/Vl5uWZszmhw Pricing Strategies No. 5 https://youtu.be/tJHoZxSfkRo Pricing Strategies No. 6 https://youtu.be/02ifeC2yvic Pricing Strategies No. 7 https://youtu.be/YsdNW98LqPM Pricing Strategies No. 8 https://youtu.be/BWmGhqIXELo Pricing Strategies No. 9 https://youtu.be/En7kGXfMGwc ► Thinking about joining Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices as a real estate agent? https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/pages/join-us ► Interested in franchise opportunities with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices? https://www.hsfaffiliates.com/OurBrands/FranchiseOpportunities.aspx ► Searching for a home? https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/ Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, based in Irvine, CA, is a real estate brokerage network built for a new era in residential real estate. The network, among the few organizations entrusted to use the world-renowned Berkshire Hathaway name, brings to the real estate market a definitive mark of trust, integrity, stability and longevity. ►Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices Facebook https://www.facebook.com/BHHSrealestate ►Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bhhsrealestate ►Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices Twitter https://twitter.com/BHHSRealEstate ►Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Pinterest https://pinterest.com/bhhsluxury
Pricing Strategies
 
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Views: 44 Adnan Shahab
Price skimming
 
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Price skimming is a pricing strategy in which a marketer sets a relatively high price for a product or service at first, then lowers the price over time. It is a temporal version of price discrimination/yield management. It allows the firm to recover its sunk costs quickly before competition steps in and lowers the market price. Price skimming is sometimes referred to as riding down the demand curve. The objective of a price skimming strategy is to capture the consumer surplus. If this is done successfully, then theoretically no customer will pay less for the product than the maximum they are willing to pay. In practice, it is almost impossible for a firm to capture all of this surplus. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 868 Audiopedia
Product line pricing strategies
 
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If you have a wide portfolio of products that includes like products as well as interchangeable and complementary ones, take a look at our video. It is dedicated to assortment-based pricing strategies. There are four of them, called “Selection”, “Set”, “Above par”, and “Image”. Which one fits you best?