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💰 How is Wealth Created | Savings and Investments
 
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How is wealth created? Saving and investing is the key to personal wealth as well as the economic growth. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way! LINKS SUPPORT our project: http://bit.ly/2fgJR9e Visit our website: http://econclips.com/ Like our Facebook page: http://bit.ly/1XoU4QV Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1PrEhxG ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Music on CC license: Kevin MacLeod: Home Base Groove – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ Kevin MacLeod: Cambodian Odyssey – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-… Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ Audionautix: TV Drama Version 1 – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…) Wykonawca: http://audionautix.com/ Audionautix: Yeah – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…) Wykonawca: http://audionautix.com/ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Econ Clips is an economic blog. Our objetive is teaching economics through easy to watch animated films. We talk about variety of subjects such as economy, finance, money, investing, monetary systems, financial markets, financial institutions, cental banks and so on. With us You can learn how to acquire wealth and make good financial decisions. How to be better at managing your personal finance. How to avoid a Ponzi Scheme and other financial frauds or fall into a credit trap. If You want to know how the economy really works, how to understand and protect yourself from inflation or economic collapse - join us on econclips.com. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way!
Views: 1086550 EconClips
Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6
 
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Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 892847 CrashCourse
Foreign Direct Investment of Malaysian Economy.
 
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for school purposes. let me know if you had used this video for your school project XD
Views: 4094 Diana Sofian
Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11
 
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So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission to use his PiPhone video. this guy really did make an artisanal smartphone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eaiNsFhtI8 Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 716147 CrashCourse
11. Behavioral Finance and the Role of Psychology
 
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Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) Deviating from an absolute belief in the principle of rationality, Professor Shiller elaborates on human failings and foibles. Acknowledging impulses to exploit these weaknesses, he emphasizes the role of factors that keep these impulses in check, specifically the desire for praise-worthiness from Adam Smith's The Theory of Moral Sentiments. After a discourse on Personality Psychology, Professor Shiller starts a list of important topics in Behavioral Finance with Daniel Kahneman's and Amos's Tversky's Prospect Theory. The value function and the probability weighting function, as two key components of this theory, help explain certain patterns in people's everyday decision making, e.g. the existence of diamond ring insurance and airline flight insurance. An in-class experiment underscores the prevalence and importance of the concept of overconfidence. Further topics include Regret Theory, gambling behavior, cognitive dissonance, anchoring, the representativeness heuristic, and social contagion. Professor Shiller concludes the lecture with some perspectives on moral judgment in the business world, addressing shared values and integrity. 00:00 - Chapter 1: Human Failings & People's Desire for Praise-Worthiness 11:37 - Chapter 2. Personality Psychology 20:14 - Chapter 3. Prospect Theory and Its Implications for Everyday Decision Making 35:53 - Chapter 4. Regret Theory and Gambling Behavior 40:40 - Chapter 5. Overconfidence, and Related Anomalies, Opportunities for Manipulation 57:16 - Chapter 6. Cognitive Dissonance, Anchoring, Representativeness Heuristic, and Social Contagion 01:12:38 - Chapter 7. Moral Judgment in the Business World Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 188280 YaleCourses
How to Make a Country Rich
 
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If you were setting out to make a country rich, what kind of mindsets and ideas would be most likely to achieve your goals? We invent a country, Richland, and try to imagine the psychology of its inhabitants. For gifts and more from The School of Life, visit our online shop: https://goo.gl/LSHb5a Download of App: https://goo.gl/E9S7uW FURTHER READING “Most of what we call ‘politics’ really revolves around the question of what you need to do to make a country richer. Rather than ask this of any specific country, let’s imagine designing a country from scratch. How could you make it as rich as possible? Suppose the brief was to design ‘Richland’: an ideal wealth-creating society. What would be the chief characteristics you’d need to build into this society? What would a nation look like that was ideally suited to success in modern capitalism?...” You can read more on this and other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/StpBHa MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/oeof2J Watch more films on CAPITALISM in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLcapitalism Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/RK1kdE SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Download of App: https://goo.gl/E9S7uW Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 1863417 The School of Life
Economics of Education: Crash Course Economics #23
 
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How does education work? Where does the money come from? Who pays for it? Is going to college a good investment? Adriene and Jacob are talking today about the economics of education. Most countries require that their citizens get some education, and most countries pay for basic education, but the quality of education can vary widely. And in the US, post-secondary education can come with a lot of costs. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 318419 CrashCourse
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 980035 CrashCourse
Elon Musk's Basic Economics
 
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Get your custom domain at http://hover.com/wendover Check out Joseph from Real Life Lore's book: http://amzn.to/2laZBie Subscribe to this new channel from Wendover Productions: https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Check out my podcast with Brian from Real Engineering: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/showmakers/id1224583218?mt=2 (iTunes link) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_10vJJqf2ZK0lWrb5BXAPg (YouTube link) Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Get a Wendover Productions t-shirt for $20: https://store.dftba.com/products/wendover-productions-shirt Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: [email protected] Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington (https://www.youtube.com/heliosphere) Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Joe Cieplinski (http://joecieplinski.com/) Elon Musk Photo 1 courtesy Heisenberg Media SpaceX footage courtesy SpaceX Tesla footage courtesy Tesla Music: "Under Suspicion" by Lee Rosevere and "Euphoric" by Sound of Picture Big thanks to Patreon supporters: Kevin Song, Kevin Song, David Cichowski, Andy Tran, Victor Zimmer, Paul Jihoon Choi, Dylan Benson, M van Kasbergen, Etienne Dechamps, Adil Abdulla, Arunabh Chattopadhyay, Ieng Chi Hin, Ken Rutabana, John Johnston, Connor J Smith, Rob Harvey, Arkadiy Kulev, Hagai Bloch Gadot, Aitan Magence, Eyal Matsliah, Sihien Goh, Joseph Bull, Marcelo Alves Vieira, Hank Green, Plinio Correa, Brady Bellini
Views: 3439267 Wendover Productions
Investment in People Creates Strong Economies
 
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Human capital is the largest component of global wealth and investing strategically in people is strongly linked to productivity and national economic growth. Investing in people's health, nutrition, education, resilience, and jobs, is clearly both the right and smart thing to do. That’s why the World Bank Group has launched the Human Capital Project, an accelerated effort to help countries invest more and better in their people. *** Photo credits: Ubirajara Machado / MDS Ana Nascimento / MDS Dominic Chavez / International Finance Corporation Arne Hoel / World Bank Allison Kwesell / World Bank Tran Thi Hoa / World Bank Curt Carnemark / World Bank Dana Smillie / World Bank Rama George-Alleyne / World Bank Jim Pickerell / World Bank Charlotte Kesl / World Bank Stephan Gladieu / World Bank Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank
Views: 586 World Bank
King Highlights Important Role of the Investment Sector in Supporting Economy
 
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English News at ten in Jordan Television Sunday : 10-05-2015
Why International Trade and Investment Are Good for the US Economy: A Story in Eight Charts
 
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Cross-border trade and investment are an important source of economic growth. Consumers enjoy greater access to cheaper, higher-quality, and more varied goods. Increased trade creates higher-paying jobs and leads the most productive firms and industries to innovate and raise standards of living worldwide. This doesn’t mean every single person will be better off, but on balance, the benefits from international trade and investment outweigh the costs. The benefits to the US economy are narrated and visualized through eight charts, focusing on the significant expansion of trade and investment in past decades, the benefits to workers in export-intensive industries, the changing nature of trade in a globalized economy and the positive role of multinationals, how trade relates to overall unemployment, and trends in US manufacturing. This video is part of an effort by the Peterson Institute for International Economics to invigorate its dissemination of reliable economic data and analysis to the broad public on important issues of general interest. Narration and Charts: Cathleen Cimino Animation and Sound: Daniel Housch and Jeremey Tripp
Views: 14586 PetersonInstitute
Saving and Borrowing
 
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On September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, and signaled the start of the Great Recession. One key cause of that recession was a failure of financial intermediaries, or, the institutions that link different kinds of savers to borrowers. We’ll get to intermediaries in the next video, but for now, we’ll first look at the market intermediaries are involved in. This market is the combination of savers and borrowers—what we call the “market for loanable funds.” To start, we’ll represent the market, using two curves you know well—supply and demand. The quantity supplied in the market comes from savings, and the quantity demanded comes from loans. But as you know, we have to factor in price. In the case of the market for loanable funds, the price is the current interest rate. What happens to the supply of savings when the interest rate goes up? When are borrowers compelled to borrow more? Or less? We’ll cover these scenarios in this video. One quick note: there’s not really one unified market for loanable funds. Instead, there are many small markets, with different sorts of lenders, lending to different sorts of borrowers. As we said in the beginning, it’s financial intermediaries, like banks, bond markets, and stock markets, which link these different sides of the market. We’ll get a better understanding of these intermediaries in our next video, so stay tuned! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/28OO1zt Next video: http://bit.ly/28Lo8nF Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/N6gx/
A Billionaire Investor Says The Economy Is Headed For '20 Years Of Ugliness' | Davos 2019
 
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Bob Prince, the co-chief investment officer at Bridgewater Associates — the world's biggest hedge fund — gave an exclusive interview to Business Insider last week at the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. MORE DAVOS 2019 CONTENT: A $736 Billion Investor Says The Market Is Predicting An Economic Slowdown | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svOkomY9s_Y Henry Blodget Leads A Panel On Facial Recognition Technology | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3adaiXkkcg Business Leaders Discuss Technology's Role In Better Capitalism | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqvrhnUd_rI ------------------------------------------------------ #Economy #Davos #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://read.bi/7XqUHI BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF -------------------------------------------------- A Billionaire Investor Says The Economy Is Headed For '20 Years Of Ugliness' | Davos 2019
Views: 253320 Business Insider
WCEF2018: Circular Finance and Impact Investment
 
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Transitioning to a circular economy will require major investments and financial capital. This session will discuss the role of international financial institutions in supporting circular economy as well as the opportunities for new impact investment tools and mechanisms for attracting private financial capital for the circular economy transition.
Views: 48 SitraFund
NEXT MARKET CRASH: 8 Ways to Prepare for Economic Collapse
 
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How to Prepare for the Next Market Crash. Patrick Bet-David shares the importance of being ready when the market crashes and eight ways you can prepare for it. Subscribe to Valuetainment: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4 Recommended videos to watch: 1. 20 Rules of Money: https://youtu.be/D9cPAuZIigs 2. How to Double Your Money: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eh5VcbLHMeI Get the free PDF: http://www.patrickbetdavid.com/prepare-next-market-crash/ About Valuetainment: Founded in 2012 by Patrick Bet-David, our goal is to impact entrepreneurs around the world through value and entertainment. We are the #1 channel for entrepreneurs because of the best interviews, best how to videos, best case studies and because we defend capitalism and educate entrepreneurs. Follow Patrick on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PatrickBetDavid.Valuetainment/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/patrickbetdavid/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/patrickbetdavid Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-bet-david-3731553
Views: 326459 Valuetainment
Monetary and fiscal policy | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Basic mechanics of monetary and fiscal policy Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/business-cycle-tutorial/v/the-business-cycle?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 663111 Khan Academy
The impact of Chinese investment on Botswana's economy
 
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Chinese trade in Africa reached US173 billion dollars in 2014, boosting growth rates on the continent and creating much needed infrastructural development. Doing Business in Botswana explores the impact of Chinese investment on Botswana's economy.
Views: 5263 CNBCAfrica
Keynesian economics | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Contrasting Keynesian and Classical Thinking Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/keynesian-thinking/v/risks-of-keynesian-thinking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 728139 Khan Academy
How The Stock Exchange Works (For Dummies)
 
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Why are there stocks at all? Everyday in the news we hear about the stock exchange, stocks and money moving around the globe. Still, a lot of people don't have an idea why we have stock markets at all, because the topic is usually very dry. We made a short video about the basics of the stock exchanges. With robots. Robots are kewl! Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, the Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt How the Stock Exchange works Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Boosting investment in the green economy
 
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The Paris Agreement on climate change and the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals at the United Nations were key milestones on the road towards an energy-efficient, low-carbon economy in Europe. According to the International Energy Agency, the full implementation of the Paris Agreement will require $13.5 trillion of investment in energy efficiency and low-carbon technologies. This is why capital markets will play an essential role in mobilising the much-needed investments for the transition to a green economy. At EU level, a High Level Expert Group on sustainable finance was launched in October 2016, as part of the Capital Markets Union (CMU) initiative launched by the European Commission. EURACTIV organised a workshop to discuss the role of sustainable finance in meeting the EU’s climate and environment objectives. Questions included: - What legislative measures can help boost sustainable investment opportunities? - What is the role of insurers in the transformation towards more sustainable investment? - How can consumers be encouraged to invest their savings and pensions in sustainable solutions?
Views: 197 EURACTIV
Banking Explained – Money and Credit
 
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Banks are a riddle wrapped up in an enigma. We all kind of know that they do stuff with money we don’t understand, while the last crisis left a feeling of deep mistrust and confusion. We try to shed a bit of light onto the banking system. Why were banks invented, why did they cause the last crisis and are there alternatives? The music from the video is available here! http://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/banking http://soundcloud.com/epicmountain/banking http://www.epic-mountain.com Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! http://kurzgesagt.org https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://twitter.com/Kurz_Gesagt http://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt http://www.behance.net/Kurzgesagt Banking Explained – Money and Credit Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Investors Adjust to a Slowing Chinese Economy
 
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Mar.14 -- Gershon Distenfeld, co-head of fixed income at AllianceBernstein, Robert Tipp, chief investment strategist at PGIM Fixed Income, and Michael Shaoul, chairman and chief executive officer at Marketfield Asset Management, discuss how markets are adjusting to slower economic growth in China. They speak with Bloomberg's Jonathan Ferro on "Bloomberg Markets: The Open."
China's Increased State Role Is Reason for Slowing Economy, Lardy Says
 
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Mar.11 -- Nicholas Lardy, senior fellow at Peterson Institute, and Carl Weinberg, chief economist at High Frequency Economics discuss Chinese leadership and how the government is handling the economy. They speak on "Bloomberg Surveillance."
G8 Social Impact Investment Forum - The role of the social impact economy
 
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Session One: Demonstrating the role of the social impact economy. Matthew Bishop (The Economist); Professor Mario Calderini (Politecnico di Torino); Minister Benoît Hamon (Minister Delegate with responsibility for the Social and Cooperative Economy and Consumer Affairs, France); Peter Holbrook (Social Enterprise UK); Karen Mills (Small Business Administration); and Nick O'Donohoe (Big Society Capital). The G8 Social Impact Investment Forum, held in London on 6 June 2013, brought together 150 leaders in social impact investment including senior politicians, government officials, major philanthropist, business and finance executives, social entrepreneurs and academics and provide an opportunity to consider the steps needed to enable the market to operate on a global scale. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/social-impact-investment-forum
Views: 463 cabinetofficeuk
19. Investment Banks
 
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Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) Professor Shiller characterizes investment banking by contrasting it to consulting, commercial banking, and securities trading. Then, in order to see the essence of investment banking, he reviews some of the principles that John Whitehead, the former chairman of Goldman Sachs, has formulated. These principles are the basis for a discussion of the substantial power that investment bankers have, and their role in society. Government regulation of these powerful investment banks has been a thorny issue for many years, and especially so now since they played a significant role in world financial crisis of the 2000s. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Key Elements of Investment Banking 09:50 - Chapter 2. Principles and Culture of Investment Banking 16:54 - Chapter 3. Regulation of Investment Banking 27:21 - Chapter 4. Shadow Banking and the Repo Market 33:04 - Chapter 5. Founger: From ECON 252 to Wall Street 46:24 - Chapter 6. Fougner: Steps to Take Today to Work on Wall Street 53:49 - Chapter 7. Fougner: From Wall Street to Silicon Valley, Experiences at Facebook 57:56 - Chapter 8. Fougner: Question and Answer Session Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 311121 YaleCourses
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1987232 TEDx Talks
Economy going to surprise to the high next year, predicts investment advisor
 
03:09
Cathie Wood, Ark Invest, discuss today's big market drop and what it means for investors and the economy heading into next year.
Views: 7594 CNBC Television
The Singularity Theory And Technology's Role In Our Economy
 
08:15
A singularity is the point at which an equation is no longer defined or well behaved. It's also a term that has been coined for a theory that at some point computer intelligence will eventually surpass human intelligence. Artificial intelligence has progressed by leaps and bounds in just a few years and humanity is more dependent on computer technology than ever before. Wes discusses how the singularity theory affects our economy and what it may mean for the next generation. Original air date: July 9, 2017 - Hour 2, Monologue. Wes Moss is the host of MONEY MATTERS – the country’s longest running live call-in, investment and personal finance radio show – on News 95-5FM and AM 750 WSB. You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think, by Wes Moss - Buy it here: http://a.co/4Srbldy These audio clips are recordings from the Money Matters radio show. The provided discussions are general in nature and based on the financial and economic events at the time and/or minimal information disclosed by call-in participants. The responses to questions are not meant to be personalized investment advice. Every person's financial situation is unique and there is no one-size-fits all advice and requires more detailed analysis than what can be conducted for a call-in participant. Any information obtained in the audio should not be accepted as investment advice and should be discussed with a financial professional. Any actions taken should only be done after evaluation and analysis of your specific situation. All investing involves risk including the loss of an investor's principal. No guarantees can be offered that any of the call-in participants were successful or that any information provided assisted the call-in participant in achieving their financial goals.
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
08:42
What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 525992 Khan Academy
EU Trade Policy explained
 
03:41
http://ec.europa.eu/trade/policy/ EU trade policy sets the direction for trade and investment in and out of the EU. The EU aims to play a key role in keeping markets open worldwide and helping Europe to exit from the economic crisis. EU trade policy is working to: create a global system for fair and open trade, open up markets with key partner countries, make sure others play by the rules and ensure trade is a force for sustainable development
Views: 67285 European Commission
The 2008 Financial Crisis: Crash Course Economics #12
 
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Today on Crash Course Economics, Adriene and Jacob talk about the 2008 financial crisis and the US Goverment's response to the troubles. So, all this starts with home mortgages, and the use of mortgages as an investment instrument. For years, it seemed like the US housing market would go up and up. Like a bubble or something. It turns out it was a bubble. But not the good kind. And the government response was...interesting. Anyway, why are you reading this? Watch the video! More Financial Crisis Resources: Financial Crisis Inquiry Report: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-FCIC/pdf/GPO-FCIC.pdf TAL: Giant Pool of Money: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/355/the-giant-pool-of-money Timeline of the crisis: https://www.stlouisfed.org/financial-crisis/full-timeline http://www.economist.com/news/schoolsbrief/21584534-effects-financial-crisis-are-still-being-felt-five-years-article Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1587384 CrashCourse
Big Investment Will Help the Economy to Grow Faster
 
07:43
Pakistani sectors are working day and night to create the jobs and stabilize the economy. Country is looking for the investors to step up and play the part to boost up the economy and that is why sectors and working hard in a positive direction.
Views: 116722 Haqeeqat TV
Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #5
 
13:43
This week, Adriene and Jacob teach you about macroeconomics. This is the stuff of big picture economics, and the major movers in the economy. Like taxes and monetary policy and inflation and policy. We need this stuff, because if you don't have a big picture of the economy, crashes and panics are more likely. Of course, economics is extremely complex and unpredictable. Today we'll talk about GDP as a measure of a country's economic health, the basics of economic analysis, and even a little about full employment, unemployment Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1252454 CrashCourse
Destiny 2 Forsaken: Economy & Investment Changes, Preparing for Forsaken & More
 
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The Weekly Update dropped and provided us with some pretty important information regarding the final month of year 1 and how your day to day experience in Destiny will be changing (or not changing) in Forsaken. THIS VIDEO IS LITERALLY JUST ME READING THE UPDATE AND GIVING THOUGHTS ON IT. The update if you wanna read it: https://www.bungie.net/en/Explore/Detail/News/47079 Timestamps for my thoughts: Mods/Elements - 1:35 Investment - 3:59 Milestone UI - 5:40 Activities - 9:00 Economy - 12:12 Eververse - 19:49 Preparing for Forsaken - 21:40 5% discount on ASTRO gear: http://www.astro.family/Datto (new international links coming soon) Need a good chair? SecretLab has you covered, use my referral link here: http://bit.ly/DattoChair (United States and SE Asia Only) If you enjoyed the video, a positive rating is always appreciated. Subscribe to the channel for more Destiny: http://bit.ly/SubToDatto Datto Does Destiny Social Media: Twitter: http://twitter.com/DattosDestiny Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DattoDoesDestiny
Views: 459934 Datto
From Socialism to Capitalism: U.S. Investment in the Russian Market Economy - George Soros (1998)
 
01:01:12
The conversion of the world's largest state-controlled economy into a market-oriented economy would have been extraordinarily difficult regardless of the policies chosen. The policies chosen for this difficult transition were (1) liberalization, (2) stabilization, and (3) privatization. These policies were based on the neoliberal "Washington Consensus" of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and U.S. Treasury Department. The programs of liberalization and stabilization were designed by Yeltsin's deputy prime minister Yegor Gaidar, a 35-year-old liberal economist inclined toward radical reform, and widely known as an advocate of "shock therapy". The partial results of liberalization (lifting price controls) included worsening already apparent hyperinflation, initially due to monetary overhang and exacerbated after the central bank, an organ under parliament, which was skeptical of Yeltsin's reforms, was short of revenue and printed money to finance its debt. This resulted in the near bankruptcy of much of Russian industry. The process of liberalization would create winners and losers, depending on how particular industries, classes, age groups, ethnic groups, regions, and other sectors of Russian society were positioned. Some would benefit by the opening of competition; others would suffer. Among the winners were the new class of entrepreneurs and black marketeers that had emerged under Mikhail Gorbachev's perestroika. But liberalizing prices meant that the elderly and others on fixed incomes would suffer a severe drop in living standards, and people would see a lifetime of savings wiped out. With inflation at double-digit rates per month as a result of printing, macroeconomic stabilization was enacted to curb this trend. Stabilization, also called structural adjustment, is a harsh austerity regime (tight monetary policy and fiscal policy) for the economy in which the government seeks to control inflation. Under the stabilization program, the government let most prices float, raised interest rates to record highs, raised heavy new taxes, sharply cut back on government subsidies to industry and construction, and made massive cuts in state welfare spending. These policies caused widespread hardship as many state enterprises found themselves without orders or financing. A deep credit crunch shut down many industries and brought about a protracted depression. The rationale of the program was to squeeze the built-in inflationary pressure out of the economy so that producers would begin making sensible decisions about production, pricing and investment instead of chronically overusing resources—a problem that resulted in shortages of consumer goods in the Soviet Union in the 1980s. By letting the market rather than central planners determine prices, product mixes, output levels, and the like, the reformers intended to create an incentive structure in the economy where efficiency and risk would be rewarded and waste and carelessness were punished. Removing the causes of chronic inflation, the reform architects argued, was a precondition for all other reforms: Hyperinflation would wreck both democracy and economic progress, they argued; they also argued that only by stabilizing the state budget could the government proceed to dismantle the Soviet planned economy and create a new capitalist Russia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Russia_(1992%E2%80%93present) Image By Wecameasromans (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 3288 The Film Archives
How the blockchain will radically transform the economy | Bettina Warburg
 
14:58
Say hello to the decentralized economy -- the blockchain is about to change everything. In this lucid explainer of the complex (and confusing) technology, Bettina Warburg describes how the blockchain will eliminate the need for centralized institutions like banks or governments to facilitate trade, evolving age-old models of commerce and finance into something far more interesting: a distributed, transparent, autonomous system for exchanging value. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 1521044 TED
How Africa is Becoming China's China
 
10:48
Start learning with Brilliant for free at http://Brilliant.org/Wendover The first 200 to sign up for a premium account with that link will also get 20% off. Check out my personal channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDA1X6RrhzZQOHOGvC3KsWg Get the Wendover Productions t-shirt: https://standard.tv/collections/wendover-productions/products/wendover-productions-shirt Subscribe to Half as Interesting (The other channel from Wendover Productions): https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: [email protected] Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Simon Buckmaster Special thanks to Patreon supporters James McIntosh, Braam Snyman, Harry Handel, KyQuan Phong, Kelly J Knight, Robin Pulkkinen, Sheldon Zhao, Nader Farzan, James Hughes, Ken Lee, Victor Zimmer, Dylan Benson, Simenn Nerlier, Donald, Etienne Dechamps, Qui Le, Chris Barker, Andrew J Thom, Keith Bopp, Alec M Watson, Chris Allen, John & Becki Johnston, Connor J Smith, Arkadiy Kulev, Eyal Matsliah, Joseph Bull, Hank Green, and Plinio Correa Otjivero Dam footage courtesy Drone Visions Namibia Music by http://epidemicsound.com
Views: 4687284 Wendover Productions
What are Derivatives ?
 
04:18
An introduction to Derivatives.
Views: 1008018 graphitishow
8. Theory of Debt, Its Proper Role, Leverage Cycles
 
01:15:17
Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) Professor Shiller devotes the beginning of the lecture to exploring the theoretical determinants of the level of interest rates. Eugen von Boehm-Bawerk names technical progress, roundaboutness, and time preference as the crucial factors. Professor Shiller complements von Boehm-Bawerk's analysis with two of Irving Fisher's modeling approaches, the view of the interest rate as the equilibrium variable in the savings market and the perspective of simple Robinson Crusoe economies on the determination of interest rates. Subsequently, Professor Shiller focuses his attention on present discounted values and derives the price for discount bonds, consols, annuities, as well as corporate bonds. His treatment of the term structure of interest rates leads him to forward rates and the expectations theory of the term structure of interest rates. At the end of the lecture, he offers insights on usurious loan practices, from ancient times until today, and describes the improvements in consumer financial protection that have been made after the financial crisis of the 2000s. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 01:24 - Chapter 2. Theories for the Determinants of Interest Rates 28:11 - Chapter 3. Present Discounted Values, Compounding, and Pricing Bond Contracts 47:50 - Chapter 4. Forward Rates and the Term Structure of Interest Rates 01:03:29 - Chapter 5. The Ancient History of Interest Rates and Usurious Loans 01:11:08 - Chapter 6. Elizabeth Warren and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 107397 YaleCourses
What is the human cost to China's economic miracle? | Head to Head
 
49:13
In this episode of Head to Head, Mehdi Hasan challenges Charles Liu, Senior Fellow at Peking University, seasoned Chinese entrepreneur and informal adviser to the Chinese government, on Xi Jinping’s record in power so far, the government’s crackdown on the Uighur Muslim minority, and what role for China if it becomes the 21st century’s military and economic superpower. With the presidential term limit abolished in 2018, critics say that Chinese President Xi Jinping appears to be paving the way to being able to stay in power for life, but Charles Liu, founder of Hao Capital, disputes this. Separately, despite lower-than-predicted growth, China is still growing substantially and is set to become the world’s biggest economy. But the economic boom has been paired with an increase in state surveillance and crackdowns on dissent, as well as the repression of the Muslim Uighur minority. So at what cost has China’s economic miracle come? And what’s the future for civil liberties of the Chinese people? In recent years China has also increased its military spending while some Chinese officials have been ratcheting up their militaristic rhetoric, raising fears of direct military confrontation with the United States. On this Head to Head episode filmed at the Oxford Union, we challenge Charles Liu on all these topics, ask him whether the Chinese economy has hit a wall, and whether China’s neighbours should dismiss their fears as his country builds up its military and extends its global reach. We are joined by a panel of three experts: Andreas Fulda - China Specialist at Asia Research Institute and Assistant Professor at the School of Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham. Victor Gao - Vice President of the Beijing based Center for China and Globalization and former interpreter for the late President Deng Xiaoping. Steve Tsang - Professor and Director of the China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) University of London. Follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/AJHeadToHead) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/AJHeadtoHead). Watch previous Head to Head episodes here: https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/headtohead/episodes.html Head to Head is Al Jazeera's forum for ideas, a gladiatorial contest tackling big issues such as faith, nationalism, democracy and foreign intervention, in front of an opinionated audience at the Oxford Union. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 81166 Al Jazeera English
Private Sector vs.  Public Sector
 
02:11
If you were mailing an extremely important package, you'd probably trust FedEx more than the U.S. Postal Service. But why? Is it because FedEx is a private company, while the post office is run by the government? What are the differences between the "private sector" and the government sector? Why does it matter? Find out in this animated two-minute video. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt This video is part of a collaborative business and economics project with Job Creators Network. To learn more about JCN, visit https://www.jobcreatorsnetwork.com. Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: If you had something really important to mail, would you head to the Post Office, which is run by the government and considered part of the public sector, or would you go to a place like UPS or FedEx, which are private businesses. Politicians in the media often talk about the private and public sectors of our economy but what's the difference? And which one is more effective? The private sector is made up of businesses or corporations owned by people. The private sector includes malls, grocery stores, and your local diner. To make a profit in the private sector, businesses must earn our money by offering us products and services that we want or need. When businesses have to compete for the same dollars, prices go down because no one wants to pay twice as much for shoes at one store if you can get the same pair cheaper at another place. On the other hand, the public sector is not supported by profits. It doesn't have to compete for our dollars. Instead, the public sector uses our tax dollars to fund its services. So we pay for these programs no matter how much or how little we use them. The government decides how our tax dollars should be spent in the public sector. This makes sense for some things. For example, you probably wouldn't want firefighters or police officers competing with one another for your business. In other cases though, this means things cost more or service is worse. The U.S. Post Office has $100 billion in debt and is regularly bailed out with taxpayer money. And the Department of Motor Vehicles isn't usually known for fast, friendly service. In contrast, private companies know that if they offer poor customer service and don't make money, they'll go out of business. When comparing the private sector with the public sector, it's clear that the market-driven private sector is more efficient. When you don't have to be profitable or accountable, things tend to be more expensive and the service is worse. So when there's a choice between a private sector or a government service, think about that package you really need delivered.
Views: 490985 PragerU
Finance and Investment into Marine Economy
 
03:37
Professor Yongmin Zhang talks about his research into marine economy which has become China's key development area and will be the growth engine for Chinese economy for the next several decades. Marine economy covers board sectors of the industry, including offshore oil gas, sustainable clean energy from offshore wind and ocean/tidal wave, marine shipping, and marine tourism. Video by Debs Storey http://www.linkedin.com/in/debsstorey
Fiscal Policy and Stimulus: Crash Course Economics #8
 
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In which Jacob and Adriene teach you about the evils of fiscal policy and stimulus. Well, maybe the policies aren't evil, but there is an evil lair involved. In this episode we learn how government use taxes and spending influence the economy. Sometimes the government gives, and sometimes it takes. And the giving and the taking can have a profound effect on how economies behave. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 907138 CrashCourse
Liberalisation, Privatisation and Globalisation
 
11:06
Class - XI Indian Economic Development Chapter - Liberalisation, Privatisation and Globalisation Notes Link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/13IpqryFn_R5Oyl4qstxgF_HbJ6RNdmpz
Views: 202509 Anurag classes
Discourse - Public investment in Agriculture & upliftment of economy
 
26:54
Speaker: Vice President Md. Hamid Ansari
Views: 689 Rajya Sabha TV
Intro to the Solow Model of Economic Growth
 
05:17
Here's a quick growth conundrum, to get you thinking. Consider two countries at the close of World War II—Germany and Japan. At that point, they've both suffered heavy population losses. Both countries have had their infrastructure devastated. So logically, the losing countries should’ve been in a post-war economic quagmire. So why wasn't that the case at all? Following WWII, Germany and Japan were growing twice, sometimes three times, the rate of the winning countries, such as the United States. Similarly, think of this quandary: in past videos, we explained to you that one of the keys to economic growth is a country's institutions. With that in mind, think of China's growth rate. China’s been growing at a breakneck pace—reported at 7 to 10% per year. On the other hand, countries like the United States, Canada, and France have been growing at about 2% per year. Aside from their advantages in physical and human capital, there's no question that the institutions in these countries are better than those in China. So, just as we said about Germany and Japan—why the growth? To answer that, we turn to today's video on the Solow model of economic growth. The Solow model was named after Robert Solow, the 1987 winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics. Among other things, the Solow model helps us understand the nuances and dynamics of growth. The model also lets us distinguish between two types of growth: catching up growth and cutting edge growth. As you'll soon see, a country can grow much faster when it's catching up, as opposed to when it's already growing at the cutting edge. That said, this video will allow you to see a simplified version of the model. It'll describe growth as a function of a few specific variables: labor, education, physical capital, and ideas. So watch this new installment, get your feet wet with the Solow model, and next time, we'll drill down into one of its variables: physical capital. Helpful links: Puzzle of Growth: http://bit.ly/1T5yq18 Importance of Institutions: http://bit.ly/25kbzne Rise and Fall of the Chinese Economy: http://bit.ly/1SfRpDL Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1RxdLDT Next video: http://bit.ly/1RxdSzo Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IHQj/
The Solow Model and the Steady State
 
07:10
Remember our simplified Solow model? One end of it is input, and on the other end, we get output. What do we do with that output? Either we can consume it, or we can save it. This saved output can then be re-invested as physical capital, which grows the total capital stock of the economy. There's a problem with that, though: physical capital rusts. Think about it. Yes, new roads can be nice and smooth, but then they get rough, as more cars travel over them. Before you know it, there are potholes that make your car jiggle each time you pass. Another example: remember the farmer from our last video? Well, unless he's got some amazing maintenance powers, in the end, his tractors will break down. Like we said: capital rusts. More formally, it depreciates. And if it depreciates, then you have two choices. You either repair existing capital (i.e. road re-paving), or you just replace old capital with new. For example, you may buy a new tractor. You pay for these repairs and replacements with an even greater investment of capital. We call the point where investment = depreciation the steady state level of capital. At the steady state level, there is zero economic growth. There's just enough new capital to offset depreciation, meaning we get no additions to the overall capital stock. A further examination of the steady state can help explain the growth tracks of Germany and Japan at the close of World War II. In the beginning, their first few units of capital were extremely productive, creating massive output, and therefore, equally high amounts available to be saved and re-invested. As time passed, the growing capital stock created less and less output, as per the logic of diminishing returns. Now, if economic growth really were just a function of capital, then the losers of World War II ought to have stopped growing once their capital levels returned to steady state. But no, although their growth did slow, it didn't stop. Why is this the case? Remember, capital isn't the only variable that affects growth. Recall that there are still other variables to tinker with. And in the next video, we'll show two of those variables: education (e) and labor (L). Together, they make up our next topic: human capital. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/23B5u4b Next video: http://bit.ly/1Sdlrvx Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IM5L/
Human Capital & Conditional Convergence
 
06:42
In our previous macroeconomics video, we said that the accumulation of physical capital only provides a temporary boost to economic growth. Does the same apply to human capital? To answer that, consider this: what happens to all new graduates, in the end? For a while, they’re productive members of the economy. Then age takes its toll, retirement rolls around, and eventually, the old workforce is replaced with a new infusion of people. But then, the cycle restarts. You get a new workforce, everyone’s productive for a while, and then they too retire. Does this ring a bell? It should, because this is similar to the depreciation faced by physical capital. Similarly, are there diminishing returns to education? It likely wouldn’t pay off for everyone to have a PhD, or for everyone to master Einstein’s great theories. That means the logic of diminishing returns, and the idea of a steady state, also applies to human capital. So, now we can revise our earlier statement. Now we can say that the accumulation of any kind of capital, only provides a temporary boost in economic growth. This is because all kinds of capital rust. So, one way or another, we’ll reach a point where new investments can only offset depreciation. It’s the steady state, all over again. However, what does the journey to steady state look like? The Solow model predicts that poor countries should eventually catch up to rich countries, especially since they’re growing from a lower base. And given their quicker accumulation of capital, poorer nations should also grow faster, than their more developed neighbors. And eventually, every country should reach similar steady states. In other words, we would see growth tracks that all eventually converge. So, why isn’t this always the case? Why, in some cases, are we seeing “Divergence, Big time,” as coined by economist Lant Pritchett? The answer to these questions, lies in the institutions of different countries and the incentives they create. Assuming that a certain set of countries do have similar institutions, that’s where we see the convergence predicted by the Solow model. We see that poorer countries do grow faster than their richer counterparts. And conditional on having similar institutions, eventually, even poorer countries will reach a similar steady state of output as more developed nations. We call this phenomenon conditional convergence. You can think of it as a national game of catch-up, with catch-up only happening if institutions don’t differ. What happens though, once all this catching up is done? Let’s not forget that there’s still another variable in the Solow model. This is variable A: ideas -- the subject of our next video. There, we’ll show you how ideas can keep a country moving along the cutting edge of growth. Catch up on the Solow model: Introduction to the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1SMud3G Physical Capital and Diminishing Returns: http://bit.ly/1SpLT31 The Solow Model and the Steady State: http://bit.ly/233vDGw Office Hours video on the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1VQ8XLe Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1NwAtKJ Next video: http://bit.ly/1SHvrdp Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IR1M/