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Flag Alphabet  ~ International maritime signal flags
 
04:46
International maritime signal flags ~ Flag Alphabet The system of international maritime signal flags is one system of flag signals representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. It is a component of the International Code of Signals (ICS).[1] Naval flag signalling undoubtably developed in antiquity in order to coordinate naval action of multiple vessels. In the Peloponnesian War (431 -- 401 BCE) squadrons of Athenian galleys were described by Thucydides as engaging in coordinated maneuvers which would have required some kind of communication;[1] there is no record of how such communication was done but flags would have been the most likely method. Flags have long been used to identify a ship's owner or nationality, or the commander of a squadron. But the use of flags for signalling messages long remained primitive, as indicated by the 1530 instruction that when the Admiral doth doth shote of a pece of Ordnance, and set up his Banner of Council on Starrborde bottocke of his Shippe, everie shipps capten shall with spede go aborde the Admyrall to know his will.[2] Several wars with the Dutch in the 17th century prompted the English to issue instructions for the conduct of particular fleets, such as (in 1673) the Duke of York's "Instructions for the better Ordering of His Majesties Fleet in Sayling". Signals were primitive and rather ad hoc ("As soon as the Admiral shall loose his fore-top and fire a gun..."), and generally a one-way communication system, as only flagships carried a complete set of flags. In 1790 Admiral Lord Howe issued a new signal book for a numerary system using numeral flags to signal a number; the number, not the mast from which the flags flew, indicated the message. Other admirals tried various systems; it was not until 1799 that the Admiralty issued a standardized signal code system for the entire Royal Navy. This was limited to only the signals listed in the Signal-Book. In 1800 Captain Sir Home Popham devised a means of extending this: signals made with a special "Telegraph" flag refererred to a separate dictionary of numbered words and phrases.[3] A similar system was devised by Captain Marryat in 1817 "for the use of vessels employed in the merchant service".[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags Semaphore Flags : Semaphore Flags is the system for conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night.[citation needed] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semaphore VIdeo produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
International maritime signal flags and their meaning | nautical alphabet flags | maritime flags
 
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Welcome to my youtube channel             TIDES AND ME In this video i'm going to mention about the maritime navigational flags and its meaning as per International Code of Signals (ICS). According to the ICS, Inside the video I'm going to mention about alphabetical maritime navigational flags and its meaning. 》Flags name  and its Meanings(ICS)《 A Alfa "I have a diver down; keep well clear at slow speed." B Bravo "I am taking in or discharging or carrying dangerous goods." C Charlie "Affirmative." D Delta "Keep clear of me; I am maneuvering with difficulty." E Echo "I am altering my course to starboard." F Foxtrot "I am disabled; communicate with me." G Golf "I require a pilot." By fishing vessels near fishing grounds: "I am hauling nets." H Hotel "I have a pilot on board." I India "I am altering my course to port." J Juliet "I am on fire and have dangerous cargo on board: keep well clear of me." or "I am leaking dangerous cargo." K Kilo "I wish to communicate with you." L Lima In harbour: "The ship is quarantined." At sea: "You should stop your vessel instantly." M Mike "My vessel is stopped and making no way through the water." N November "Negative." O Oscar "Man overboard." P Papa In harbour: All persons should report on board as the vessel is about to proceed to sea. At sea: It may be used by fishing vessels to mean: "My nets have come fast upon an obstruction." Q Quebec "My vessel is 'healthy' and I request free pratique." R Romeo (No ICS meaning as single flag) S Sierra "I am operating astern propulsion." T Tango "Keep clear of me." Fishing boats: "Keep clear of me; I am engaged in pair trawling." U Uniform "You are running into danger." V Victor "I require assistance." W Whiskey "I require medical assistance." X Xray "Stop carrying out your intentions and watch for my signals." Y Yankee "I am dragging my anchor." Z Zulu "I require a tug." By fishing vessels near fishing grounds: "I am shooting nets." YouTube.com/TIDESANDME 》subscribe my channels 》Leave your comments 》Do like and share
Views: 4214 TIDES AND ME
International Code of Flag Signals - Self Testing
 
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More tools on http://allships.com.au International Code of Flag Signals self-testing video slides for helping you to prepare for coxswain/master exams and orals. Just guess the object and wait for answer.
Views: 10268 Femaso
Code of Signal single letter and flags
 
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Code of Signal single letter and flags
Views: 628 Coastal Safety
U.S. NAVY SIGNAL CORPS FLAG SEMAPHORE /  BLINKER / MORSE CODE TRAINING FILM  85664
 
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This fascinating 1943 U.S. Navy training film shows "How to Signal" using flag hoists, semaphore, and blinker to present morse code messages. The film was produced by F.H. Hargove of the Prior Motion Picture Company in New York and supposedly narrated by "Radcliffe Hall" (like a pseudonym for a radio announcer). A review in "Motor Boating" magazine noted that "the film shows pictorially how to learn the codes in the International Flag, Semaphore and Blinker systems of Communication. Expert signal men in the U.S. service serve as instructors and demonstrate the correct methods of using these three methods. It is designed so that the film may be repeated again and again until the student becomes familiar with the signal flags and positions of the semaphore, and the light flashes of the blinker…" Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night. The use of lights for spelling out messages in Morse code dates back to 1867. With the advent of electric lights in the 1890s, the "blinker light" became an effective tool for signaling. Most widely used by naval ships, blinker lights were essential for merchant ships sailing in wartime convoys and observing radio silence. Blinker has remained a useful backup for merchant vessels, and until the late 1980s deck officers were trained in its use. Usually however, blinker work was done by the Radio Officer. Beginning in the 1930s, both civilian and military pilots were required to be able to use Morse code, both for use with early communications systems and for identification of navigational beacons which transmitted continuous two- or three-letter identifiers in Morse code. Aeronautical charts show the identifier of each navigational aid next to its location on the map. Radio telegraphy using Morse code was vital during World War II, especially in carrying messages between the warships and the naval bases of the belligerents. Long-range ship-to-ship communication was by radio telegraphy, using encrypted messages, because the voice radio systems on ships then were quite limited in both their range and their security. Radiotelegraphy was also extensively used by warplanes, especially by long-range patrol planes that were sent out by those navies to scout for enemy warships, cargo ships, and troop ships. Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. The International Morse Code encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes", or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes. The duration of a dash is three times the duration of a dot. Each dot or dash is followed by a short silence, equal to the dot duration. The letters of a word are separated by a space equal to three dots (one dash), and the words are separated by a space equal to seven dots. The dot duration is the basic unit of time measurement in code transmission. To increase the speed of the communication, the code was designed so that the length of each character in Morse varies approximately inversely to its frequency of occurrence in English. Thus the most common letter in English, the letter "E", has the shortest code, a single dot. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 25463 PeriscopeFilm
How to Send a Rescue Signal by Semaphore
 
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Watch more Disaster Survival & Worst-Case Scenarios videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/406961-How-to-Send-a-Rescue-Signal-by-Semaphore The semaphore flag-signaling system is an alphabet-based system that requires waving a pair of hand-held flags in particular patterns. Here's how you send a rescue signal using the flags. Step 1: Get the receiver's attention Get the attention of the person you wish to send the signal to by waving both of your flags repeatedly overhead in a scissor-like motion. Step 2: Wait for acknowledgment Wait for the receiving party to send the semaphore letter K with their flags. This is the signal to proceed. Tip There are unique flag positions for each letter of the alphabet. Step 3: Transmit N-C Transmit the letters N-C using your semaphore flags. Move directly from the N position to the C position without stopping. Tip In the International Code of Signals the letters N-C stand for "I am in distress and require immediate assistance." Step 4: Bring your flags down Bring your flags down in front of you with the flag staffs crossing each other after you have finished. Step 5: Wait for acknowledgment Wait for the receiver to send the letter C, acknowledging your distress call. If your message was not received, they will send the letters I-M-I. If this happens, resend your message. Did You Know? The International Code of Signals was drafted in 1855 by the British Board of Trade.
Views: 36838 Howcast
34   signaling flags
 
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When in sight of another vessel and no flares or radio are available you can use the signaling flags to call attention to a distress situation. If you require assistance you can use the Code Flag "Victor". Hoist the Code Flag "November" above the Code Flag "Charly" or a black square over a black ball if you are in imminent danger and immediate assistance is required . Code Flag "Whiskey" is used if you require medical assistance. Sound signals made with a whistle or a gong can also be helpful in attracting attention. If no signaling device is available use your arms. Stand facing in the direction of assistance and slowly raise and lower your arms. A combination of flags, audio and arm signals can be used to attract attention.
Independence Day [OST] #10 - International Code
 
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Composed by David Arnold © 1996 BMG Classics/RCA Victor
Views: 113474 BestScores
International Safety Management Code (ISM)
 
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The purpose of this Code is to provide an international standard for the safe management and operation of ships and for pollution prevention. The Code establishes safety-management objectives and requires a safety management system (SMS) to be established by "the Company", which is defined as the shipowner or any person, such as the manager or bareboat charterer, who has assumed responsibility for operating the ship. The Company is then required to establish and implement a policy for achieving these objectives. This includes providing the necessary resources and shore-based support. Every company is expected "to designate a person or persons ashore having direct access to the highest level of management". The procedures required by the Code should be documented and compiled in a Safety Management Manual, a copy of which should be kept on board. After completion of this part you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding about the background of the ISM Code. International Safety Management Code - ISM https://youtu.be/kMqaQ26zG0g International Safety Management Requirements https://youtu.be/g55WkNZFWZc ISM Audits Checklist, Reports and Reviews https://youtu.be/-EWN_ESKvPs ISM Plans, Procedures and Work Permits https://youtu.be/JnOibCb1Vz4 Safety Management System - SMS https://youtu.be/LPNa7xZqLu4 Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 11496 Marine Online
Le code Morse
 
06:00
Cours netprof.fr de Electricité / Télécommunication Prof : Julien
Views: 31333 netprof
International Morse Code Hand Sending 1966 US Army Training Film
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "PRINCIPLES AND BASIC TECHNIQUE FOR GOOD, RHYTHMIC SENDING 0F MORSE CODE BY OPERATING THE HAND KEY." US Army training film TF11-3697 Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts. US Army Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0C7C6CCF1C0DEBB3 Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). Due to music copyright claims, a few musical passages in this film had to be distorted or blanked. The spoken audio was not affected. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code Morse code is a method of transmitting textual information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. The International Morse Code encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes" respectively, or "dis" and "dahs". Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each character (letter or numeral) is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes. The duration of a dash is three times the duration of a dot. Each dot or dash is followed by a short silence, equal to the dot duration. The letters of a word are separated by a space equal to three dots (one dash), and two words are separated by a space equal to seven dots. The dot duration is the basic unit of time measurement in code transmission. Morse code speed is measured in words per minute (wpm) or characters per minute (cpm). Characters have differing lengths because they contain differing numbers of dots and dashes. Consequently words also have different lengths in terms of dot duration, even when they contain the same number of characters. For this reason, a standard word is helpful to measure operator transmission speed. "PARIS" and "CODEX" are two such standard words. One important feature of Morse code is coding efficiency. The length of each character in Morse is approximately inversely proportional to its frequency of occurrence in English. Thus, the most common letter in English, the letter "E," has the shortest code, a single dot. A related but different code was originally created for Samuel F. B. Morse's electric telegraph by Alfred Vail in the early 1840s. This code was the forerunner on which modern International Morse code is based. In the 1890s it began to be extensively used for early radio communication before it was possible to transmit voice. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, most high-speed international communication used Morse code on telegraph lines, undersea cables and radio circuits. Morse code is most popular among amateur radio operators although it is no longer required for licensing in most countries, including the US. Pilots and air traffic controllers are usually familiar with Morse code and require a basic understanding. Aeronautical navigational aids, such as VORs and NDBs, constantly identify in Morse code. An advantage of Morse code for transmitting over radio waves is that it is able to be received over poor signal conditions that would make voice communications impossible. Because it can be read by humans without a decoding device, Morse is sometimes a useful alternative to synthesized speech for sending automated digital data to skilled listeners on voice channels. Many amateur radio repeaters, for example, identify with Morse even though they are used for voice communications. For emergency signals, Morse code can be sent by way of improvised sources that can be easily "keyed" on and off, making it one of the simplest and most versatile methods of telecommunication. The most common distress signal is SOS or three dots, three dashes and three dots, internationally recognised by treaty... A typical "straight key." [the] U.S. model, known as the J-38, was manufactured in huge quantities during World War II, and remains in widespread use today. In a straight key, the signal is "on" when the knob is pressed, and "off" when it is released. Length and timing of the dots and dashes are entirely controlled by the operator...
Views: 38454 Jeff Quitney
SOS  Morse Code · International Standard Emergency Signal
 
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Emergency video with standard Morse Code times, at a speed of 8 words per minute. In an emergency, remember this video and leave it playing, is just another way of calling for help! :) In morse code, SOS is represented as: . . . - - - . . . The SOS distress signal was first adopted by the German government in radio regulations effective April 1, 1905, and became the worldwide standard under the second International Radiotelegraphic Convention, which was signed on November 3, 1906, and became effective on July 1, 1908. SOS remained the maritime radio distress signal until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System. SOS is still recognized as a visual distress signal. The SOS distress signal is a continuous sequence of three dits, three dahs, and three dits, all run together without letter spacing. In International Morse Code, three dits form the letter S, and three dahs make the letter O, so "SOS" became an easy way to remember the order of the dits and dahs. In modern terminology, SOS is a Morse "procedural signal" or "prosign", and the formal way to write it is with a bar above the letters. In popular usage, SOS became associated with such phrases as "Save Our Ship" or "Save Our Souls" or "Send Out Succour". SOS is only one of several ways that the combination could have been written; VTB, for example, would produce exactly the same sound, but SOS was chosen to describe this combination. SOS is the only nine-element signal in Morse code, making it more easily recognizable, as no other symbol uses more than eight elements. More information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOS
Views: 2394 GammaBox
International Code Flags Quick Quiz 2
 
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International Code Flags Quick Quiz 2 Ten quick questions to help you check your knowledge. No one is counting - only you - so have some fun and see how you get on - less than three minutes of quick quick fun with www.coastalsafety.com
Views: 63 Coastal Safety
International code for abcd
 
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Code alphabet
Views: 99 SA CHANEL
Signal Code Flags මුහුදේදී බවිතා වන කොඩි සහ සලකුණු ගැන ඉගන ගනිමු
 
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Signal Code Flags මුහුදේදී බවිතා වන කොඩි සහ සලකුණු ගැන ඉගන ගනිමු Marine professionals need to know these flags and the international meaning, This is so that they can take immediate action as required. These code signals are used internationally on ships yachts boats and rescue services.
Views: 53 Coastal Safety
Morse Code and Flags.wmv
 
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Morse Code and Flag Signals Help
Views: 10368 ResolutionPhotograph
HOW IT WORKS: Morse Code
 
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The basic method is explained for sending messages using a telegraph machine transmitting short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes".
Views: 832608 DOCUMENTARY TUBE
International Code Flags
 
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Intl Code Flags
Views: 289 Empressionista1
Maritime signals
 
00:31
Designed for Navel Officers and Cadets about to take their MCA Signal Examinations, Maritime Signals offers you the simplest way to learn Morse Code and International Code Flags right at your fingertips. Learn the Morse Code Alphabet through specific tests that will teach you how to send and receive Morse Code messages. The International Code Flags won't be a mystery anymore, learn their phonetic and meanings, train to quickly recognize them and get ready to sail! www.maritimesignals.com
Views: 188 Ben Naylor
How to signal at sea
 
00:49
Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Ensign Andrei Zamfir from the Romanian Navy speaks about the uses of the flags and their relevance today. To find out more about the NATO phonetic alphabet, codes and signals, visit: http://bit.ly/alphabetNATO ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ SUBSCRIBE to this channel http://bit.ly/NATOsubscribe SUBSCRIBE to NATO News http://bit.ly/NATONewsSubscribe SUBSCRIBE to NATO History http://bit.ly/NATOHistorySubscribe Connect with NATO online: Visit the Official NATO Homepage: http://bit.ly/NATOhomepage Find NATO on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/NATOfacebook Follow @NATO on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/NATOtwitter Follow NATO on Instagram: http://bit.ly/NATOinstagram Find NATO on Google+: http://bit.ly/NATOgoogleplus Find NATO on LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/NATOlinkedin Find NATO on Flickr: http://bit.ly/NATOflickr #NATO #WeAreNATO #OTAN
Views: 2358 NATO
Nautical Signal Flags
 
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Nautical Signal flags A to Z, 0 to 9 and Substitutes.
Views: 11478 Nautical Training 777
The Morse Code
 
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One way to learn the Morse Code is through picture association between the sound and the respective alphabet. This has been adapted from a picture posted in shtfpreparedness.com.
Views: 373944 Chandan Lahiri
Maritime Code Flags
 
00:13
Maritime Code Flags offers you the simplest way to learn International Code Flags right at your fingertips. The International Code Flags wont be a mystery anymore, learn their phonetic and meanings, train to quickly recognize them and get ready to sail! Features: -Code to Flag Phonetic Quiz -Flags Phonetics and Meanings Table Learn more about morse code and code flags with all our apps!
Views: 264 Ben Naylor
Communications Afloat-excerpt, 2013
 
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Communications Afloat, 2013, Dahlia Elsayed Communications Afloat is a poem I wrote using combinations of flag definitions from the International Code of Signals. The poem will be performed on the ocean, as a visual reading, where each line is raised and lowered on the signal mast of a boat. The full poem and images of the performance are being produced in a book form. The International Code of Signals is a set of 40 alphabetical and numerical flags that are used by vessels to communicate important messages. This globally understood system of symbol-based communication was first drafted in 1855 and remains essential to safe navigation in open waters. This project was made with support from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council's Swingspace residency program.
Views: 1049 delsayed
International Morse Code, Hand Sending
 
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Principles And Basic Technique For Good, Rhythmic Sending 0f Morse Code By Operating The Hand Key. National Archives and Records Administration INTERNATIONAL MORSE CODE, HAND SENDING Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Chief Signal Officer. (09/18/1947 - 02/28/1964) ARC Identifier 36813 / Local Identifier 111-TF-3697.
Views: 68910 Nuclear Vault
FLAG NUMBERS ~ NATO & International maritime signal flags
 
01:06
FLAG NUMBERS ~ NATO & International maritime signal flags The system of international maritime signal flags is one system of flag signals representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. It is a component of the International Code of Signals (ICS).[1] Naval flag signalling undoubtably developed in antiquity in order to coordinate naval action of multiple vessels. In the Peloponnesian War (431 -- 401 BCE) squadrons of Athenian galleys were described by Thucydides as engaging in coordinated maneuvers which would have required some kind of communication;[1] there is no record of how such communication was done but flags would have been the most likely method. Flags have long been used to identify a ship's owner or nationality, or the commander of a squadron. But the use of flags for signalling messages long remained primitive, as indicated by the 1530 instruction that when the Admiral doth doth shote of a pece of Ordnance, and set up his Banner of Council on Starrborde bottocke of his Shippe, everie shipps capten shall with spede go aborde the Admyrall to know his will.[2] Several wars with the Dutch in the 17th century prompted the English to issue instructions for the conduct of particular fleets, such as (in 1673) the Duke of York's "Instructions for the better Ordering of His Majesties Fleet in Sayling". Signals were primitive and rather ad hoc ("As soon as the Admiral shall loose his fore-top and fire a gun..."), and generally a one-way communication system, as only flagships carried a complete set of flags. In 1790 Admiral Lord Howe issued a new signal book for a numerary system using numeral flags to signal a number; the number, not the mast from which the flags flew, indicated the message. Other admirals tried various systems; it was not until 1799 that the Admiralty issued a standardized signal code system for the entire Royal Navy. This was limited to only the signals listed in the Signal-Book. In 1800 Captain Sir Home Popham devised a means of extending this: signals made with a special "Telegraph" flag refererred to a separate dictionary of numbered words and phrases.[3] A similar system was devised by Captain Marryat in 1817 "for the use of vessels employed in the merchant service".[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags Semaphore Flags : Semaphore Flags is the system for conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night.[citation needed] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semaphore VIdeo produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013 FLAG NUMBERS,NATO,Signal Flags,Royal Navy,Flag (Collection Category),Navy signals,Flag signals,
CODE INTERNATIONAL DES SIGNAUX (Signaux d'une lettre)
 
14:22
Pavillons: Alfa Bravo Charlie Delta Echo Foxtrot Golf Hôtel India Juliett Kilo Lima Mike November Oscar Papa Québec Roméo Sierra Tango Uniform Victor Wiskey X-ray Yankee Zulu 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9 ; 0
Views: 842 BROC-BAIE-DE-SOMME
International Code Flags Quick Quiz 1
 
02:34
International Code Flags Quick Quiz 1 Ten quick questions to help you check your knowledge. No one is counting - only you - so have some fun and see how you get on - less than three minutes of quick quick fun with www.coastalsafety.com
Views: 87 Coastal Safety
SOS Morse code distress signal
 
00:36
SOS is the commonly used description for the international Morse code distress signal (· · · -- -- -- · · ·). This distress signal was first adopted by the German government in radio regulations effective April 1, 1905, and became the worldwide standard under the second International Radiotelegraphic Convention, which was signed on November 3, 1906 and became effective on July 1, 1908. SOS remained the maritime radio distress signal until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress Safety System. SOS is still recognised as a visual distress signal.
Views: 323560 Rob Abdul
Signaling-Semaphore Flag Conversation- Forrest Yeh
 
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This is to fulfill the Signaling merit badge requirements regarding the use of semaphore flags to send and receive a message. By Forrest Yeh- Troop 11
Views: 52855 yehsk8rz
Code Signal
 
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For my people still in Richmond...
Views: 19 Garren Shipley
Flags Code (J2ME)
 
01:13
Flags Code is a small, usefull mobile software written in java that will help you to learn the Flags Signaling and the meaning of flags in the International Code of Signals. You will learn about Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo and so on untill Xray, Yankee and Zulu. by www.javaphone.it
Views: 2643 javaphone
International maritime signal flags - Námořní vlajková abeceda
 
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#100 - International maritime signal flags - Námořní vlajková abeceda Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Geografie-28-623380997852178/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel My channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn2W-CVKCaxJMRUyvqxsJRA/videos Email: [email protected] Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Geografie-28-623380997852178/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel Můj kanál: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn2W-CVKCaxJMRUyvqxsJRA/videos Email: [email protected]
Views: 2267 Geografie 28
Batfish Submarine Signal Lamp International Morse Code
 
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The Signal/Search Lamp (sometimes called an Aldis lamp) on the Batfish SS-310 submarine has been set to flash a message using the International Morse Code. The message has been programmed into an Arduino Uno R3 microcontroller and the lamp is driven by a solid state AC relay. The Jack Tar March, composed by John Philip Sousa, is played by the United States Naval Academy Band.
Views: 1727 John Martin
LEARN TRAFFIC SIGNS | ROAD SIGNS WITH MEANINGS FOR KIDS AND ALL
 
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If you Like the video please Subscribe the channel using the link below: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZQJfWAIZoh-_fUJ9773HNw This video is on Traffic signs. This video will tell you about road signs with their meanings. More than 30 traffic signs are explained . I hope you like the video. If you like the video then please share the video . For quiz videos, you can click on the link below: https://goo.gl/8Lx94F For watching english videos kids click on the following link https://goo.gl/DZstfg For watching maths tips and tricks videos click on the following link https://goo.gl/6ihWte For watching maths videos for kids click on the following link https://goo.gl/kBUcxw For watching kids animation videos click on the following link https://goo.gl/2eXA24
Views: 986170 Easy Tips
Stop Carrying Out Your Intentions And Watch For My Signals - VVAA
 
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A collective photobook which explores visual and conceptual parallels between the flags of the International Code of Signals and the pictures of Santos' harbor made by the workshop participants. Developed during Valongo International Image Festival, Santos (São paulo, Brazil), 2016. Concept, design: Walter Costa, Ivan Padovani Images: Bruna Piantino, Daniela Paoliello, Fábio Gonçalves, Mateus Santos, Rafael Balão, Vanessa Rodrigues Editing: Bruna Piantino, Daniela Paoliello, Fábio Gonçalves, Ivan Padovani, Mateus Santos, Rafael Balão, Vanessa Rodrigues, Walter Costa Publisher: self-published Format: 22 x 29 cm Pages: 112 Binding: loose round spine Printing: inkjet Paper: uncoated offset paper 150gr (cover: fine art rag paper 240gr) Year: 2016
Views: 53 Walter Costa
Signal flags
 
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Views: 169 mickkirk207
South Africa a step closer to making sign language official
 
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Sign language could soon become an official language in South Africa. A parliamentary committee has recommended that the international code of hand signals used by hearing impaired citizens be recognised as the country's 12th official language. CGTN's Yolisa Njamela has more. Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ow.ly/Zvqj30aIsgY Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cgtnafrica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cgtnafrica
Views: 250 CGTN Africa
How To Signal At Sea To Other Ships
 
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A short piece on flag semaphore. Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Footage taken aboard the Romanian Navy ship Regele Ferdinand, a part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2), which was taking part in a Passing Exercise in the Black Sea to increase interoperability between British, Romanian and Turkish naval forces. Shots of various flags being displayed and hoisted. Crew sorting flags in storage room. Courtesy Video Natochannel
typhoon Mina, International code name: Mitag
 
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La Union, Benguet under signal no. 1 Heavy downpours are on & off.
Views: 883 BN PADILLA
International Morse Code: Lesson 4
 
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Here is lesson 4 covering the letters K, D, W, and the number 2. Be sure to stop by www.HamWhisperer.com for the Random Run sequence. Thanks and 73! -Andy
Views: 35574 The Ham Whisperer

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