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5 Psychology Experiments You Couldn't Do Today
 
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In the past, some experiments were run in scary and unethical ways. From using children to unknowing subjects, these five experiments left people affected for the rest of their lives. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Patrick Merrithew, Will and Sonja Marple, Thomas J., Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters, charles george, Kathy & Tim Philip, Tim Curwick, Bader AlGhamdi, Justin Lentz, Patrick D. Ashmore, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Benny, Fatima Iqbal, Accalia Elementia, Kyle Anderson, and Philippe von Bergen. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.theguardian.com/law/2015/jul/10/us-torture-doctors-psychologists-apa-prosecution http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/ http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/regulations-and-policy/belmont-report/ Little Albert http://www.apa.org/monitor/2010/01/little-albert.aspx http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Watson/emotion.htm The Monster Study http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=6264&context=etd http://www.uh.edu/ethicsinscience/Media/Monster%20Study.pdf The Milgram Experiment https://www.und.edu/instruct/wstevens/PROPOSALCLASS/MARSDEN&MELANDER2.htm The Bystander Effect http://www.wadsworth.com/psychology_d/templates/student_resources/0155060678_rathus/ps/ps19.html http://psycnet.apa.org/?&fa=main.doiLanding&doi=10.1037/h0025589 The Stanford Prison Experiment http://www.prisonexp.org/ http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/an-important-but-rarely-discussed-lesson-of-the-stanford-prison-experiment/ Photos: Wundt Research Group: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wundt-research-group.jpg
Views: 1579891 SciShow
The Psychology of Accents
 
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The surprising effects behind our accents. SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! Click here: http://ow.ly/rt5IE Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. CORRECTION: It's meant to be "rhotic" and "non-rhotic" accent. Very sorry, I was confused. Follow BrainCraft on Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill or https://twitter.com/Brain_Craft Tumblr http://braincraft.tumblr.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Braincraft Google+ https://www.google.com/+braincraftvideo BrainCraft is written and hosted by Vanessa Hill (https://twitter.com/nessyhill) for PBS Digital Studios More videos: This Video is Just For You http://youtu.be/5FQTK4oRz_w The Negative Side of Positive Thinking http://youtu.be/UFeOw1tC_ew References: 0:07 Ramachandran, V. S., & Hubbard, E. M. (2001). Synaesthesia--a window into perception, thought and language. Journal of consciousness studies, 8(12), 3-34. http://ww2.psy.cuhk.edu.hk/~mael/papers/RamachandranHubbard_Synaesthesia.pdf 0:24 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect 0:58 Kuhl, P. K., Stevens, E., Hayashi, A., Deguchi, T., Kiritani, S., & Iverson, P. (2006). Infants show a facilitation effect for native language phonetic perception between 6 and 12 months. Developmental science, 9(2), F13-F21. http://ilabs.washington.edu/kuhl/pdf/Kuhl_etal_2006.pdf 1:23 http://mentalfloss.com/article/29761/when-did-americans-lose-their-british-accents 2:13 Lev-Ari, S., & Keysar, B. (2010). Why don't we believe non-native speakers? The influence of accent on credibility. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46(6), 1093-1096. http://psychology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/LevAriKeysar.pdf 2:33 Dixon, J. A., Mahoney, B., & Cocks, R. (2002). Accents of guilt? Effects of regional accent, race, and crime type on attributions of guilt. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 21(2), 162-168. http://mdhauser.blog.com/files/2012/02/Dixon2002Journal-of-Language-and-Social-Psychology.pdf 3:10 Leitman, D. I., Wolf, D. H., Ragland, J. D., Laukka, P., Loughead, J., Valdez, J. N., ... & Gur, R. (2010). " It's not what you say, but how you say it": a reciprocal temporo-frontal network for affective prosody. Frontiers in human neuroscience,4, 19. http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnhum.2010.00019/full 3:10 Mitchell, R. L., Elliott, R., Barry, M., Cruttenden, A., & Woodruff, P. W. (2003). The neural response to emotional prosody, as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychologia, 41(10), 1410-1421. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028393203000174
Views: 341611 BrainCraft
The milgram experiment (full film)
 
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The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. They measured the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience. Milgram first described his research in 1963 in an article published in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology[1] and later discussed his findings in greater depth in his 1974 book, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View.
Views: 120567 matt
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1793364 Veritasium
Finding Journal Articles for Psychology Research
 
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A tutorial for Psychology students at Valencia College
How to support Research with Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks
 
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Supporting Research with Theory I was asked: “how do you support your study relationship based on a theoretical or conceptual framework?” This video gets you to think about … 1) Is your question about a particular theory? 2) Is theory used to justify your question? 3) Is theory used to organize your findings? 4) Is your research about generating a new theory? 5) Is theory useful to explain the context or researcher stance? 6) Is a conceptual framework needed? Examples: Killam, L. A, & Carter, L. M. (2010). Challenges to the student nurse on clinical placement in the rural setting: A review of the literature. Rural and Remote Health, 10(online), 1523. http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=1523 Killam, L. A., & Heerschap, C. (2012). Challenges to student learning in the clinical setting: A qualitative descriptive study. Nurse Education Today. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.008 http://www.nurseeducationtoday.com/article/S0260-6917(12)00360-7/abstract Killam, L. A., Montgomery, P., Raymond, J. M., Mossey, S., Timmermans, K. E., & Binette, J. (2012). Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology. BMC Nursing. doi: 10.1186/1472-6955-11-26 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6955/11/26 Related Links: http://libguides.usc.edu/content.php?pid=83009&sid=618409 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/research_and_nursing_theories.html Further Reading: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/48274_ch_3.pdf http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 110982 NurseKillam
How to write the Discussion part 1
 
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How to write the Discussion section of a scientific research paper. Here is a link to the gorilla paper discussed in the video: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168159105004193
Views: 97100 Steve Kirk
Buddhist Meditation meets Western Psychology - Prof. Kaisa Puhakka (USH - Matei Georgescu)
 
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A native of Finland, Kaisa Puhakka has an interdisciplinary educational background with an M.A. degree in philosophy, with specialization in Asian and comparative thought, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Experimental Psychology, all from the University of Toledo, Ohio. Soon thereafter, she enrolled at Adelphi University's Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies in New York and obtained a postdoctoral diploma in clinical psychology, specializing in psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy, in 1983. At the same time, she continued her study of Hindu and Buddhist philosophical thought and a variety of Buddhist meditative practices which in more recent years have included monastic Rinzai Zen. After teaching in the Humanistic-Transpersonal Masters program of West Georgia College (now State University of West Georgia) and at The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, Dr Puhakka joined the Clinical Psychology faculty at CIIS in 2001. She has taught a wide range of courses including psychopathology, transpersonal psychology, and cultural issues in clinical practice. She currently teaches in the areas of psychodynamic as well as existential theory and practice, the interface of Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, and spiritual and religious issues in clinical practice. Dr Puhakka has published a book and some 45 articles and book chapters in comparative philosophy, phenomenology, Buddhist practice in the West, eco-psychology, and the evolution and transformation of consciousness. She was formerly Editor of The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology and remains on the board of editors for this journal as well as for The Journal of Humanistic Psychology. Dr Puhakka is licensed in California and has an active psychotherapy and consultation/supervision practice in San Francisco and Palo Alto. Her practice specializes in relationship issues and in personal and spiritual growth.
Views: 3402 Matei Georgescu
Anatomy of a Journal Article
 
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This video walks you through each section of a typical psychology journal article, with explanations of what to look for in each one.
Views: 342 Rachelle Tannenbaum
What is REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT? What does REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT mean?
 
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What is REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT? What does REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT mean? REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT meaning - REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT definition - REPRODUCIBILITY PROJECT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Reproducibility Project: Psychology was a collaboration of 270 contributing authors to repeat 100 published experimental and correlational psychological studies. This project was led by the Center for Open Science (COS){linked} and its co-founder, Brian Nosek, who started the project in November of 2011. The results of this collaboration were published in August 2015. Reproducibility is the ability to produce a copy or duplicate, in this case it is the ability to replicate the results of the original studies. The project has illustrated the growing problem of failed reproducibility in science.This project has started a movement that has spread through the science world with the expanded testing of the reproducibility of published works. Brian Nosek of University of Virginia and colleagues sought out to replicate 100 different studies that all were published in 2008. The project pulled these studies from three different journals, Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, published in 2008 to see if they could get the same results as the initial findings. In their initial publications 97 of these 100 studies claimed to have significant results. To stay as true as they could the group went through extensive measures to remain true to the original studies, to the extent of consulting the original authors. Even with all the extra steps taken to ensure the same conditions of the original studies only 36.1% of the studies replicated, and if they did replicate their effects were smaller than the initial studies effects. The authors emphasized that the findings reflect a problem that affects all of science not just psychology, and that there is room to improve reproducibility in psychology. Failure to replicate can be caused by a few different reasons. The first is a type II error, which is when you accept the null hypothesis when it is false. This can be classified as a false positive. A type I error is the rejection of a null hypothesis even if it is true, so this is considered a false negative. The Center for Open Science which was founded by Brian Nosek and Jeff Spies in 2013. They have built a team that today has about 50 individuals on it. The goal of the group is to help increase the openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. The COS which is a rather small number of individuals oversee much larger groups that are helping with the COS's mission. The group is made up of multiple different kinds of scientists which include astronomers, biologists, chemists, computer scientists, education researchers, engineers, neuroscientists, and psychologists. There have been multiple implications of the Reproducibility Project. People all over have started to question the legitimacy of scientific studies that have published in esteemed journals. Journals typically only publish articles with big effect sizes that fail to reject the null hypothesis. Leading into the huge issue of people re-doing studies that have already found to fail, but not knowing because there is no record of the failed studies, which will lead to more false positives to be published. It is unknown if any of the original study authors committed fraud in publishing their projects, but some of the authors of the original studies are part of the 270 contributors of this project. One earlier study found that around $28 billion worth of research per year in medical fields is non-reproducible.
Views: 229 The Audiopedia
Experimental study of apparent behavior. Fritz Heider & Marianne Simmel. 1944
 
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An Experimental Study of Apparent Behavior Fritz Heider and Marianne Simmel The American Journal of Psychology Vol. 57, No. 2 (Apr., 1944), pp. 243-259 (article consists of 17 pages) Published by: University of Illinois Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1416950
Views: 120863 Yann Leroux
What is LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT? What does LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT mean?
 
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What is LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT? What does LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT mean? LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT meaning - LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT definition - LITTLE ALBERT EXPERIMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The Little Albert experiment was a controlled experiment showing empirical evidence of classical conditioning in humans and operant conditioning in humans. The study also provides an example of stimulus generalization. It was carried out by John B. Watson and his graduate student, Rosalie Rayner, at Johns Hopkins University. The results were first published in the February 1920 issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology. After observing children in the field, Watson hypothesized that the fearful response of children to loud noises is an innate unconditioned response. He wanted to test the notion that by following the principles of the procedure now known as "classical conditioning", he could use this unconditioned response to condition a child to fear a distinctive stimulus that normally would not be feared by a child (in this case, furry objects). The aim of Watson and Rayner was to condition a phobia in an emotionally stable child. For this study they chose a nine-month old infant from a hospital referred to as "Albert" for the experiment. Watson followed the procedures which Pavlov had used in his experiments with dogs. Before the experiment, Albert was given a battery of baseline emotional tests: the infant was exposed, briefly and for the first time, to a white rat, a rabbit, a dog, a monkey, masks (with and without hair), cotton, wool, burning newspapers, and other stimuli. Albert showed no fear of any of these items during the baseline tests. For the experiment proper, Albert was put on a mattress on a table in the middle of a room. A white laboratory rat was placed near Albert and he was allowed to play with it. At this point, Watson and Rayner made a loud sound behind Albert's back by striking a suspended steel bar with a hammer each time the baby touched the rat. Albert responded to the noise by crying and showing fear. After several such pairings of the two stimuli, Albert was presented with only the rat. Upon seeing the rat, Albert got very distressed, crying and crawling away. Apparently, the infant associated the white rat with the noise. The rat, originally a neutral stimulus, had become a conditioned stimulus, and it was eliciting an emotional response (conditioned response) similar to the distress (unconditioned response) originally given to the noise (unconditioned stimulus). In further experiments, Little Albert seemed to generalize his response to the white rat. He became distressed at the sight of several other furry objects, such as a rabbit, a furry dog, and a seal-skin coat, and even a Santa Claus mask with white cotton balls in the beard. However, this stimulus generalization did not extend to everything with hair. It should be noted that Watson's experiment had many failings by modern standards. For example, it had only a single subject and no control subjects. Most importantly, such an experiment would never be allowed under current law and regulations, as it clearly subjected the infant to severe stress and potential long-term psychological damage. Albert was about one year old at the end of the experiment, and he reportedly left the hospital shortly thereafter. Though Watson had discussed what might be done to remove Albert's conditioned fears, he had no time to attempt such desensitization with Albert, and it is likely that the infant's fear of furry things continued post-experimentally. ....
Views: 3547 The Audiopedia
100 LAYERS OF CREDIBILITY
 
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SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! 👉 http://ow.ly/rt5IE PRE-ORDER BRAINCRAFT MERCH! https://store.dftba.com/collections/braincraft How do makeup and our perception of beauty affect our trustworthy and credible we appear? The 100 layer challenge, with science. From Sally Le Page, GRWM, Science Edition! https://youtu.be/eXlaHAn0bws More BrainCraft: The Most Beautiful Face in the World? https://youtu.be/07MzPrkwJsw My Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill | Instagram https://instagram.com/nessyhill BrainCraft was created by Vanessa Hill (@nessyhill) and is brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. REFERENCES 📓 Etcoff, N. L., Stock, S., Haley, L. E., Vickery, S. A., & House, D. M. (2011). Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: Modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals. PloS one, 6(10), e25656. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0025656 Jones, A. L., & Kramer, R. S. (2015). Facial cosmetics have little effect on attractiveness judgments compared with identity. Perception, 44(1), 79-86. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/19e1/2444871b714c629f6b13d2897cd67287613d.pdf Van’t Wout, M., & Sanfey, A. G. (2008). Friend or foe: The effect of implicit trustworthiness judgments in social decision-making. Cognition, 108(3), 796-803. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/23188803_Friend_or_foe_The_effect_of_implicit_trustworthiness_judgments_in_social_decision-making Carrillo, L., Coleman, B., & Hack, T. (2014). What’s in a Face?: Perceptions of Women Wearing Cosmetics. Journal Contents, 19(2), 13-22. https://www.fhsu.edu/uploadedFiles/academic/college_of_arts_and_sciences/psych/JPI/Vol%2019,%202.pdf#page=13 READ MORE: Jones, A. L., Kramer, R. S., & Ward, R. (2014). Miscalibrations in judgements of attractiveness with cosmetics. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(10), 2060-2068. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robert_Ward26/publication/261137396_Miscalibrations_in_judgements_of_attractiveness_with_cosmetics/links/58382a9008aef00f3bf9e75c.pdf Tagai, K., Ohtaka, H., & Nittono, H. (2016). Faces with Light Makeup Are Better Recognized than Faces with Heavy Makeup. Frontiers in psychology, 7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4771839/pdf/fpsyg-07-00226.pdf
Views: 41051 BrainCraft
The Bizarre Ways Your Name Affects Your Behaviour
 
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We love ourselves, and our names, more than we consciously realise. Research has found this implicit egotism has some pretty interesting effects. Twitter: https://twitter.com/nessyhill Instagram: http://instagram.com/nessyhill SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! Click here: http://ow.ly/rt5IE ↓ MORE LINKS BELOW ↓ BrainCraft is written and hosted by Vanessa Hill (https://twitter.com/nessyhill) for PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. Sound design: Joel Werner (http://joelwerner.com) Research: Rachelle Oldmixon (https://twitter.com/rachelleishere) Keep in touch! Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill Instagram https://instagram.com/nessyhill/ Tumblr http://braincraft.tumblr.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Braincraft Last week on BrainCraft: 4 Lesser-Known Scientific Discoveries! (And the people behind them) https://youtu.be/wv-BvwRYiXE References: Pelham, B. W., Mirenberg, M. C., & Jones, J. T. (2002). Why Susie sells seashells by the seashore: implicit egotism and major life decisions. Journal of personality and social psychology, 82(4), 469. http://persweb.wabash.edu/facstaff/hortonr/articles%20for%20class/pelham,%20mirenberg,%20and%20jones%20implicit%20egotism.pdf Polman, E., Pollmann, M. M., & Poehlman, T. A. (2013). The Name-Letter-Effect in Groups: Sharing Initials with Group Members Increases the Quality of Group Work. PloS one, 8(11), e79039. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0079039 Dyjas, O., Grasman, R. P., Wetzels, R., Van der Maas, H. L., & Wagenmakers, E. J. (2012). What's in a name: a Bayesian hierarchical analysis of the name-letter effect. Frontiers in psychology, 3. http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00334/full Jones, J. T., Pelham, B. W., Mirenberg, M. C., & Hetts, J. J. (2002). Name letter preferences are not merely mere exposure: Implicit egotism as self-regulation.Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38(2), 170-177. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022103101914970 Nuttin, J. M. (1987). Affective consequences of mere ownership: The name letter effect in twelve European languages. European Journal of Social Psychology, 17(4), 381-402. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ejsp.2420170402/abstract
Views: 679982 BrainCraft
How Restaurants Use Psychology to Make You Spend More Money
 
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Restaurants have a whole bucket-load of tricks up their sleeves to get you to spend more money. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, Inerri, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Bella Nash, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.nutr.24.012003.132140 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900704001510 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-015-0046-9 http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/chrpubs/169/ http://www.le.ac.uk/press/ebulletin/news/havingtherighttaste.html http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2009.00267.x/abstract http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?Id=8588 http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/662615 https://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/discoveries/color-your-plates-matters http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2466/pms.2002.94.2.671 https://academic.oup.com/jcr/article-abstract/30/3/455/1790637/Bottoms-Up-The-Influence-of-Elongation-on-Pouring http://www.mdpi.com/2306-5710/3/3/33/htm http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329314001542 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0043007 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329315000907 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-017-0052-1 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329317301192 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-12 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-7 https://cpl.revues.org/398 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0013916506295574 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329311000966 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2011.00351.x/full https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-4 https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/publications/322876 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2005.12/full Images: https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-7
Views: 1299086 SciShow Psych
Psychology Databases Research Articles Connell
 
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Browse UT Martin's databases pertinent to Psychology. Discussion and demonstration on elements of Primary or Original Research Articles.
Milgram Obedience Study
 
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Why should you question authority? The answer lies within this ground breaking social psychology experiment by Stanley Milgram regarding human behavior and authority. Download, Archive, Mirror, Share! *DISCLAIMERS and NOTICES* Fair Use Statement According to the "Fair Use" clause of International Copyright Law, the uploader declares that the use of the photos/images/information in this academic/reference/scholarly work is for purposes of "criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research" according to Section 107. - Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use, U.S. Copyright Code. The uploader does not claim authorship, or copyright claim to this video or it's contents. This work is intended for educational and historical purposes only. "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use." FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material, the use of which may not always have been specifically Authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available for educational purposes, and as such this constitutes 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Act. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is available without profit to those who have expressed an interest in the included information for research and educational purposes.
Views: 593883 livewordcanada
CogNovo Workshop On Experimental Methods: Developmental psychology and practical examples
 
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Day 4 of the CogNovo Workshop on Experimental Methods (26/06/14). Michaela Gummerum (SchoolLab, Plymouth University) and Claire Delle Luche (BabyLab, Plymouth University) discuss experimental methods in developmental psychology and present practical examples. http://www.cognovo.eu/ http://www.psy.plymouth.ac.uk/research/schoollab/default.aspx http://www.psy.plymouth.ac.uk/babylab/
Views: 372 PlymouthCognition
Critiquing Classic Psychology Studies (Part 3)
 
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A follow-up to part 2.
Views: 174 Darrell Rudmann
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 14135445 LastWeekTonight
Psychology Research Presentation
 
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The Impact of Binge Drinking on Exercise Motivation in University Students
Views: 6202 RuSsBaNg01
Types of Case Study. Part 1 of 3 on Case Studies
 
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A lecture on case studies as a research strategy taken from a series on research methods and research design given to masters (graduate) students by Graham R Gibbs at the University of Huddersfield. This is part 1 of three, and deals with the different kinds of case studies and looks at some key examples from the social sciences such as single cases, community studies and organizations, institutions, events, roles and relationships as cases. Somer references on case studies Edwards, D. 1. A. (1998) Types of case study work: A conceptual framework for case-based research, Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 3 8(3), pp. 36-70. Gerring, John (2007) Case Study Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. & Foster, P. (eds) (2000) Case Study Method. London: Sage. Miles, A B, & Huberman, A.M. (1994) Qualitative data analysis. an expanded sourcebook, Sage. Robson, C. (1993) Real World Research, Oxford: Blackwell. Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. London: SAGE. Stake, R. (1994) Case Studies, In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln Handbook of Qualitative Research, Sage. Swaborn, P (2010) Case Study Research, London: SAGE. Tight, M (2017) Understanding Case Study Research: Small Scale Research with Meaning. Thousand Oaks, CA; London;: SAGE. Thomas, Gary (2016) How to do your case study, 2nd Ed. London: SAGE Travers, M. (2013). Qualitative research through case studies. Thousand Oaks, CA;London;: SAGE. Wilson, S. L. (1995) Single case experimental designs. In G. M. Breakwell, S, Hammond & C. Fife-Shaw (Eds.), Research Method in Psychology, Sage. Yin, R. & (1998) The Abridged Version of Case Study Research: Design and Method. In: L. Bickman & D. J. Rog (Eds.), Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage. pp 229 - 259. Yin, R. K (2014) Case Study Research: Design &Methods, 5th Ed, Sage. Yin, R. K. (2011) Applications of Case Study Research. 3rd Ed. London: Sage.
Views: 177176 Graham R Gibbs
John Jost - System Justification Theory
 
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John T. Jost is Professor of Psychology and Politics and Co-Director of the Center for Social and Political Behavior at New York University. His research, which addresses stereotyping, prejudice, political ideology, and system justification theory, has been funded by the National Science Foundation and has appeared in top scientific journals and received national and international media attention. He has published over 200 journal articles and book chapters and four co-edited book volumes, including Social and Psychological Bases of Ideology and System Justification (Oxford, 2009). He has received numerous honors and awards, including the Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, Erik Erikson Award for Early Career in Political Psychology, International Society for Self and Identity Early Career Award, Society for Personality and Social Psychology Theoretical Innovation Prize, Society of Experimental Social Psychology Career Trajectory Award, and the Morton Deutsch Award for Distinguished Scholarly and Practical Contributions to Social Justice. He has served on several editorial boards and executive committees of professional societies and is currently editor of the Oxford University Press book series on Political Psychology. He is a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Association of Psychological Science, and is past President of the International Society of Political Psychology.
Doing BEST: Installing and running Bayesian estimation software
 
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How to install and run software that accompanies the article, Bayesian estimation supersedes the t test, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
Views: 3257 John K. Kruschke
VR and Body Ownership - How your brain figures out where and what your body is! | Game & Science
 
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How do you know that your hand is your hand? How can we become fully immersed in virtual reality or with prosthetic limbs? What processes are involved in our brain? Let's discuss your sense of agency, body ownership, and the Rubber Hand Illusion! Most of the information discussed here come directly from academic journal articles. If anything said in the video is incorrect or debatable, please comment below!!! All clips used for educational and illustrative purposes. #Neuroscience #Illusion #VR Music: - Vanishing Point from Transistor OST - Faded (original track) https://soundcloud.com/dragnerz/faded References: - Kalckert, A., & Ehrsson, H. H. (2012). Moving a Rubber Hand that Feels Like Your Own: A Dissociation of Ownership and Agency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6(March), 40. http://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2012.00040 - Kilteni, K., Normand, J. M., Sanchez-Vives, M. V., & Slater, M. (2012). Extending body space in immersive virtual reality: a very long arm illusion. PloS one, 7(7), e40867. - Maravita, A., & Iriki, A. (2004). Tools for the body (schema). Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8(2), 79–86. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2003.12.008 - Marasco, P. D., Kim, K., Colgate, J. E., Peshkin, M. A., & Kuiken, T. A. (2011). Robotic touch shifts perception of embodiment to a prosthesis in targeted reinnervation amputees. Brain, 134(3), 747–758. http://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awq361 - Newport, R., & Preston, C. (2010). Pulling the finger off disrupts agency, embodiment and peripersonal space. Perception, 39(9), 1296–1298. http://doi.org/10.1068/p6742 - Petkova, V. I., & Ehrsson, H. H. (2008). If I were you: Perceptual illusion of body swapping. PLoS ONE, 3(12). http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0003832 - Salomon, R., Fernandez, N. B., van Elk, M., Vachicouras, N., Sabatier, F., Tychinskaya, A., … Blanke, O. (2016). Changing motor perception by sensorimotor conflicts and body ownership. Scientific Reports, 6(April), 25847. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep25847 - Samad, M., Chung, A. J., & Shams, L. (2015). Perception of body ownership is driven by Bayesian sensory inference. PLoS ONE, 10(2), 1–23. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0117178 - Tsakiris, M., Carpenter, L., James, D., & Fotopoulou, A. (2010). Hands only illusion: Multisensory integration elicits sense of ownership for body parts but not for non-corporeal objects. Experimental Brain Research, 204(3), 343–352. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-009-2039-3 - Witt, J. K., Proffitt, D. R., & Epstein, W. (2005). Tool use affects perceived distance, but only when you intend to use it. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 31(5), 880–888. http://doi.org/10.1037/0096-1523.31.5.880 ___ Come chat on our Discord ➢ https://discord.gg/szt7Dfz Twitch ➢ https://www.twitch.tv/littlegadget/ Twitter ➢ https://twitter.com/LittleGadgeting Music ➢ https://soundcloud.com/dragnerz Website ➢ https://www.fdraconis.com ___ LittleGadget design by http://meerin.tumblr.com/ and redesign by https://twitter.com/ElliPuukangas
Views: 854 LittleGadget
What's the ideal open-access journal for cognitive psychology?
 
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The European Society for Cognitive Psychology (ESCoP) recently announced that they will launch a new open-access journal. Editor-in-chief-to-be Candice Morey asked the community what they wanted the new journal to look like. She received many ideas—but what do they mean? In this video blog I provide some background and explanations. See also https://candicemorey.org/?p=158 and https://www.cogsci.nl/blog/escop-goes-open-access
Views: 402 Sebastiaan Mathôt
Retraction! Ramifications of Research on Video Games
 
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Can research launch political movements, affect public policy and change the course of history? Social science may often seem concerned with pointless or frivolous topics of interest mostly to boring academics, but bad research had the potential to seriously affect the world. In the realm of video games, researchers have been trying to identify causal links between gameplay and aggression and ultimately violence for decades to no avail, yet many believe games lead to violent behavior. Even President Trump seems to think so, but why? Perhaps in part because of researchers publishing bad data that potentially skew the facts about games and media in their political favor, such as it seems one man, Dr Bushman, seems to have been doing, with a 3rd article of his now retracted and a 4th heavily edited. Let's take a look at the ramifications of bad research and some various issues of publication, including those pesky paywalls. Original Video on Games and Violence: https://youtu.be/nSR55br-mas Dr. Layman's Video on Accessing Articles: https://youtu.be/4qsvyJhjIz8 You can Gib Shekels Here: https://www.patreon.com/AydinPaladin https://streamlabs.com/aydinpaladin Merch Store: https://teespring.com/stores/altana-vault References: Anderson, C. A., Shibuya, A., Ihori, N., Swing, E. L., Bushman, B. J., Sakamoto, A. & Saleem, M., Rothstein, H.R., & Saleem, M. (2010). Violent video game effects on aggression, empathy, and prosocial behavior in eastern and western countries: a meta-analytic review. Bushman, B. J., Rothstein, H. R., & Anderson, C. A. (2010). Much ado about something: Violent video game effects and a school of red herring: Reply to Ferguson and Kilburn (2010). Benjamin, A. J., Jr., & Bushman, B.J. (2016). The weapons priming effect. Current Opinion in Psychology, Volume 12, 2016, 45-4 Benjamin, A. J., Jr., Kepes, S., & Bushman, B. J. (2017).RETRACTED: Effects of weapons on aggressive thoughts, angry feelings, hostile appraisals, and aggressive behavior: A meta-analytic review of the weapons effect literature. Personality and Social Psychology Review. Çetin, Y., Wai, J., Altay, C., & Bushman B. J. (2016). RETRACTED: Effects of violent media on verbal task performance in gifted and general cohort children. Gifted Child Quarterly, 60(4), 279-287. Douglas, K. S., Guy, L. S., & Hart, S. D. (2009). Psychosis as a risk factor for violence to others: a meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 135(5), 679. Fazel, S., Gulati, G., Linsell, L., Geddes, J. R., & Grann, M. (2009). Schizophrenia and violence: systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Medicine, 6(8), e1000120. Ferguson, C. J. (2007a). Evidence for publication bias in video game violence effects literature: A meta-analytic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 12, 470 – 482. Ferguson, C. J. (2007b). The good, the bad and the ugly: A meta-analytic review of positive and negative effects of violent video games. Psychiatric Quarterly, 78, 309 –316 Ferguson, C. J., & Kilburn, J. (2010). Much ado about nothing: the misestimation and overinterpretation of violent video game effects in eastern and western nations: comment on Anderson et al.(2010). Han, D. H., Hwang, J. W., & Renshaw, P. F. (2011). Bupropion sustained release treatment decreases craving for video games and cue-induced brain activity in patients with Internet video game addiction. Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, 18(4), 297-304. Joyal, C., Dubreucq, J.-L., Gendron, C., & Millaud, F. (2007). Major Mental Disorders and Violence: A Critical Update. Current Psychiatry Reviews, 3(1), 33–50. Larivière V, Haustein S, Mongeon P (2015) The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era. PLoS ONE 10(6). Wakefield, A. J., Murch, S. H., Anthony, A., Linnell, J., Casson, D. M., Malik, M., ... & Valentine, A. (1998). RETRACTED: Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet, 351 (9103), 637-641. Verhulst, B., Eaves, L. J., & Hatemi, P. K. (2012). Correlation not causation: The relationship between personality traits and political ideologies. American Journal of Political Science, 56(1), 34-51. Links https://goo.gl/T5uack https://goo.gl/1Dv3PW https://goo.gl/i9j73r https://goo.gl/dvxML https://goo.gl/bvAQcV https://goo.gl/7epjCB https://goo.gl/ruFqcZ https://goo.gl/Gw1NPC https://goo.gl/LmER5E https://goo.gl/mKUDpD https://goo.gl/oJirYr https://goo.gl/N58MtG https://goo.gl/1wrTof https://goo.gl/BMa7Ad https://goo.gl/cfL9b9 https://goo.gl/hm17ot https://goo.gl/ruFqcZ
Views: 19012 Aydin Paladin
What Is The Spacing Effect In Psychology?
 
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Hundreds of articles, including a number 30 aug 201615 sep 2010 research on the spacing effect began with pioneering work hermann ebbinghaus in 1885. Advance online the design of a typical study on spacing effect is illustrated in figure 1. Study better space it out and mix up retention training the spacing effect anewspring. Journal of experimental psychology learning, memory, and cognition, 19, definition distributed practice effects our online dictionary has the spacing effect a case study in failure to apply results psychological research journal general, jun 27, 2011, no pagination i've spoken often about that it's better spread out your keywords metacognitive control, effect, children's metacognition, son, department psychology, barnard college, columbia university, 31 jan 2017 cognitive 28(6), 684 706(2014). This design includes psychology learning, memory, & cognition, 13, 344 349 7 may 2016 many paradigms have been utilized to verify the spacing effect. Click here for the 2017 chapter 06 table of contentsas a rule, repetitions an experience farther apart in time will 22 may 2012 spacing effect is arguably most replicable and robust finding from experimental psychology. Spacing effect wikipediapsychology glossary the spacing flashcard learnerin chapter 06 memory. Journal of experimental psychology learning, memory, and cognition. Learn vocabulary spacing effect the disruptive of prior learning on recall new information 4 oct 2013 and metacognitive control. Spacing effect wikipedia a url? Q alleydog glossary definition. From psychology an distributing learning over time the spacing effect in children's what is effect? What does mean psychology? Youtube. The spacing effect in children's generalization of knowledge allowing 6 feb 2011 the late 1800s, german psychologist hermann ebbinghaus set out to memorize hundreds nonsense syllables and discovered it was more. Spacing effect explained in 2 minutes ap psychology chapter 9 memory flashcards spacing effect, spaced repetitions, distributed practice, etc and interleaving of study practice iowa state universitydistributed effects dictionary definition metacognitive control the columbia university. Phpspacing effect states that we learn material more effectively and easily when study it several times spaced out over a longer time span, rather than trying to in short period of the spacing is phenomenon whereby learning greater studying spread time, as opposed same amount content single session. That is, it is better to use spaced presentation rather than massed in the field of psychology spacing effect refers finding that information, which presented over intervals learned and retained more easily this 2007 version. Will at work learning research reviews of the spacing effect 'spacing effect' calls for an end to last minute cramming globe. Ben carey recently wrote about the benefits 29 dec 2014 psychologist hermann ebbinghaus discovered in 1885 that people an important principle contributes to this is spacing effect 6 aug 2012 one of many bits science memrise uses make was originally by german start studying ap psychology chapter 9 memory.
Views: 101 Sparky feel
Chris French on Pseudoscience - Interview Part 2 of 4
 
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Christopher Charles French is a British psychologist and vocal skeptic specialising in the psychology of paranormal beliefs and experiences, cognition and emotion. He is currently Professor of Psychology at Goldsmiths College, University of London, is head of their Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit which he founded in 2000, and former Editor-in-Chief of The Skeptic (UK) magazine. He teaches a course entitled Psychology, Parapsychology and Pseudoscience as part of the BSc (Hons) Psychology programmes at both Goldsmiths College and Birkbeck College. He is a Chartered Psychologist and a Fellow of the British Psychological Society.[ He has authored or co-authored over 80 articles and chapters dealing with a wide variety of subjects in psychology, his work has been published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, the British Journal of Psychology and the British Journal of Clinical Psychology. The focus of his current research is the psychology of paranormal beliefs and anomalous experiences. In addition to academic activities, such as conference presentations and invited talks in other departments, he frequently appears on radio and television presenting a sceptical view of paranormal claims. He has been consulted as an expert on a wide range of such claims including psychic abilities, recovered memory, telepathy, faith healing, past life regression,[9] ghosts,[10] UFO abductions, out-of-body experiences, astrology and so on. In 2004 French and colleagues conducted an experiment involving electromagnetic fields (EMF) and extremely low frequency sound waves (infrasound) phenomena that have been associated with allegedly haunted locations, the experiment did not establish a causal relationship between these phenomena and experiences of the subjects. A study, led by French and published in 2008, explored the psychology of people who believed they had been abducted by aliens. He has appeared on various science programmes (e.g. Equinox, Science Now, All in the Mind) and documentaries (e.g. Heart of the Matter, Everyman) as well as numerous discussion programmes (e.g. Esther; The Time, The Place; Kilroy; This Morning). In 1997, he was one of three sceptics sitting on a panel for a 90-minute live debate on UFOs broadcast at peak viewing time by the Strange but True? team to mark the 50th anniversary of UFOs. In 1998, he took part in an investigation of reincarnation claims amongst the Druze people of Lebanon, broadcast as part of the To the Ends of the Earth series. This involved spending around three weeks in Lebanon with a film crew. photo of Chris French presenting from podium at the World Skeptics Congress 2012 in Berlin Chris French at the 2012 World Skeptics Congress in Berlin In August 1996, he organised and chaired an integrated paper session on the topic of The Psychology of Paranormal and Pseudoscientific Beliefs at the XXVI International Congress of Psychology in Montreal. He also contributed to a symposium on The Psychology of Anomalous Experience at the British Science Association annual British Science Festival at the University of Birmingham in September 1996. In July 1997, he chaired a symposium on The Psychology of Paranormal Belief at the Fifth European Congress of Psychology in Dublin. He presented a paper at a conference on Paranormal and Superstitious Beliefs: A Skeptical Examination at Manchester Metropolitan University on Friday 13 November 1998. In February 1999, he contributed to a symposium of the Royal Statistical Society (which he co-organised). In July 1999, he co-organised and presented a paper at a half-day conference on Parapsychology: Current Status and Future Prospects at Goldsmiths College and gave a paper at the Sixth European Congress of Psychology in Rome. In February 2001, he gave an invited presentation to the Institute for Cultural Research at the Royal Society of Medicine and he has organised two symposia at major conferences (Glasgow, March 2001; London, July 2001). He made regular appearances on ITV's programme Haunted Homes. He also makes appearances in the Channel 4 documentary series 'Tony Robinson and the Paranormal'. Since 2009, French has been a columnist for The Guardian newspaper exploring scepticism and anomalistic psychology. In January 2010, French was elected as a Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_French Science, Technology & the Future - By Design http://scifuture.org
Why People Blame Others
 
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Catch blame shifting before it spreads 😷 Want to get my new email newsletter? Okay: https://goo.gl/Zw5Txq ORDER BRAINCRAFT MERCH! 🧠https://store.dftba.com/collections/braincraft SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! 👉 http://ow.ly/rt5IE Humans are complicated: a tangled web of amazing biology and bad behaviours. This illustrated field guide will equip you with the necessary tools to navigate the lying, jealous and judgmental tendencies of your fellow humans. This week we explore blame-shifting 👈 My Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill | Instagram https://instagram.com/nessyhill BrainCraft was created by Vanessa Hill (@nessyhill) and is brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. This episode was written by Bahar Gholipour and filmed by Dominique Taylor. Animations by Vanessa Hill. A big thank you to Mike Rugnetta for his help improving the audio from the previous version. Thank you also to Joe Hanson for his thumbnail advice. REFERENCES 📚 Fast, N. J., & Tiedens, L. Z. (2010). Blame contagion: The automatic transmission of self-serving attributions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46(1), 97-106. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022103109002601 Lee, F., & Tiedens, L. Z. (2001). Who's being served?“Self-serving” attributions in social hierarchies. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 84(2), 254-287. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074959780092925X Mason, R. O. (2004). Lessons in Organizational Ethics from the Columbia Disaster:: Can a Culture be Lethal?. Organizational Dynamics, 33(2), 128-142. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090261604000117
Views: 31850 BrainCraft
ournal Article Critiques
Need a 700 word journal critique for psychol
 
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ournal Article Critiques Need a 700 word journal critique for psychology. Will provide the journal critique article template and an example. Running Head: PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORY OF 20TH CENTURY 1 PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORY OF 20TH CENTURY 3 Article: The Psychology Laboratory at the Turn of the 20th Century By Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr. Alice Chan (Student) AU ID 2750777 PSYCH 290 Journal Article Critique 1 Shelley Sikora (tutor) November 03, 2011 Body of the Text 1. Research Question or Problem The purpose of the article is to outline the influence that psychology laboratories have had on modern psychology, and how experimental laboratory has changed psychology into a discipline of science. 2. Introduction During the 1800s, psychologists made great efforts to change psychology to a discipline of science instead of being a part of philosophy or a mystical subject. They believed that psychology is testable like many other science curriculums. According to the article, by 1880 the experimental laboratory was the \u201cpublic icon for natural science\u201d (Ludy, 2000, p.318). The first experimental laboratory was founded by Wundt in 1879 and this marks the beginning of modern psychology as science. Many great psychologists, stated in the article, have shown great support and attraction towards the idea of the experimental laboratory. Although the laboratory is no longer viewed as an icon for psychology, it is still an important training place for all undergraduate psychology students. 3. Methodology In this article, the author uses history to support his argument that the psychology laboratory was instrumental in transforming psychology from philosophy to science. References of famous psychologists were used and cited to support the author\u2019s historical approach for the article. Table 1 (Ludy, 2000, p319) is a list of laboratories that have been built from 1883 to 1900 in the United States. Figure 1 (Ludy, 2000, p.320) is an example of how the early psychology experimental laboratories loo
The Psychology of Tyranny: Did Milgram Get It Wrong? | Alex Haslam | TEDxUQ
 
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Professor Alex Haslam’s work reviews the famous Milgram’s experiment to show how tyranny and obedience actually work. His talk explores current thinking around the psychology of tyranny centering on a reinterrogation of the conclusions derived from Milgram’s ‘obedience to authority’ research. Alex Haslam is Professor of Psychology and Australian Laureate Fellow at the University of Queensland. His research focuses on the study of group and identity processes in social and organizational contexts. Together with over 200 co-authors, Alex has written and edited 11 books and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles on these topics, and his work had been cited over 20,000 times. In 2013 his book The New Psychology of Leadership won the International Leadership Association’s Outstanding Leadership Book Award. He is a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and former Editor of the European Journal of Social Psychology. In 2016 he won the British Psychology Society Presidents’ Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 16978 TEDx Talks
The Milgram Experiment Full Documentary 1962 - Brainwashing Exposed
 
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The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. They measured the willingness of study participants, men from a diverse range of occupations with varying levels of education, to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience. Participants were led to believe that they were assisting an unrelated experiment, in which they had to administer electric shocks to a "learner." These fake electric shocks gradually increased to levels that would have been fatal had they been real. The experiment found, unexpectedly, that a very high proportion of men would fully obey the instructions, albeit reluctantly. Milgram first described his research in a 1963 article in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology and later discussed his findings in greater depth in his 1974 book, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View. The experiments began in July 1961, in the basement of Linsly-Chittenden Hall at Yale University, three months after the start of the trial of German Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem. Milgram devised his psychological study to answer the popular contemporary question: "Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the Holocaust were just following orders? Could we call them all accomplices?" The experiment was repeated many times around the globe, with fairly consistent results.
Views: 535 Patrick Baptist
What Women Want Men To Know About Sexism | Theresa Vescio | TEDxPSU
 
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She’s so sexy! Clearly a complement, right? Terri Vescio discusses how well performing women can be threatening and are often sexualized in ways that can make women feel psychologically and physically unsafe. Theresa K. Vescio is a Professor of Psychology and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality studies. Her research seeks to understand the factors that facilitate and temper the expression of sexism, racism, and heterosexism. Dr. Vescio has two lines of research that are funded by the National Science Foundation – research on the underrepresentation of women in masculine domains (e.g., science, technology, engineering, business) and her research on masculinity. Dr. Vescio has published numerous articles, edited a volume on The Social Psychology of Power (with Ana Guinote), served as Associate Editor for both the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Interpersonal Relations and Group Processes and the British Journal of Social Psychology, and served on the editorial boards of Psychological Science, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, and Social Psychology and Personality Science. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 26373 TEDx Talks
14 Psychological Facts That Can Make Your Life Easier
 
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How to Make Your Life Easier. Useful psychological tips can help you to increase your motivation, become a better communicator, improve your relationships with others, and lead a healthier life. We have put together a list of simple secrets to having rational thoughts, being productive, communicating effectively, and having a good mood. Watch this video guide till the end to find out how to reduce stress from a depressing life event, master your dreams thanks to video games, get an annoying song out of your head and more. TIMESTAMPS Self-confidence is more important than appearance. 0:48 Men listen to women for only 6 minutes. 1:29 Writing down your thoughts reduces stress. 2:10 Sing the end of a song to get it out of your head. 3:22 Playing video games makes you the master of your dreams. 3:55 People with car stickers are more quick-tempered. 4:28 Eye contact keeps a conversation going. 5:04 4 seconds make silence awkward. 5:25 The color blue can increase productivity. 5:58 People return a found wallet if there's a baby picture in it. 6:34 Speaking about your goals makes you lose motivation. 7:20 You can convince yourself that you slept well. 7:48 When uncertain, you tend to choose what's first on the list. 8:22 Thoughts in another language are more rational. 8:45 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Webster University researchers found out that women can easily draw the attention of a potential partner if they look at him with a confident and direct smile. -Topics that are particularly hard for men to concentrate on include fashion and shopping, horoscopes, diets, celebrities, gossip about people they don't know, and their partner's colleagues. -Writing about your traumatic experiences improves your emotional state, reduces anxiety, and helps you to break free from a depressing life event. -There is an easy trick to get rid of the annoyance: listen to the song until the very end to achieve a sense of closure. -Both video games and night dreams represent alternate realities. That's why those who can control their game environment often transfer this ability to their dreams. -A group of researchers at Colorado State University in Fort Collins came to the intriguing conclusion that people with a large number of stickers were more likely to engage in road rage. -If you want to make a conversation last longer but don't know what to say, ask your conversational partner a question. After you've heard the answer, keep looking at them without saying a word. -A silence as brief as 4 seconds can affect the self-esteem of the interlocutors, making them feel anxious, rejected, and less self-assured. -If you want a stimulating, mind-energizing environment, blue is the best color for you. Combining blue with orange will not only make you productive but will also make your mind and emotions more balanced. -Wallets containing a picture of a cute baby were 88% more likely to be returned to their owners, as per experiment in Edinburgh results. -Different studies that have been conducted since 1933 show that informing other people about your intentions makes you less likely to try harder in comparison to when you keep your goals private. -A study conducted by Colorado College researchers and published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology shows that if you convince yourself that you rested well during the night, your cognitive performance will increase. -"The order effect" works like this: the first name on the ballot is going to win in one out of 10 elections. -Since thinking in a non-native language requires a lot of cognitive abilities, it makes the decision-making process slower, less biased, and more reliable. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 67489 BRIGHT SIDE
The Myth of Modern R-a-c-i-s-m Amongst Men
 
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This will be a video article what will be of particular interest to M-G-T-O-W's, M-R-A’s and Anon-ymous activists. It covers perceived racism amongst men, and the reason why men do not understand the difference between r-a-c-i-s-m and sexism under the context of competition. I have remastered it And separated it into to easier to digests and to increase comprehension. Turd Flinging Monkey; The E-nemies of Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3Ks2T_P9Kk See Black Pigeon Speaks; Diversity DESTROYS Social Cohesion in the West: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTROCGb5qj8 References 1. Abramson, L. Y., Seligman, M. E., & Teasdale, J. D. (1978). Learned helplessness in humans: critique and reformulation. Journal of abnormal psychology, 87(1), 49. 2. Bechtel, W. (2014). Cognitive biology: surprising model organisms for cognitive science. In Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: Cognitive Science Society (pp. 158-163). 3. Broadbent DE, Cooper PF, FitzGerald P, Parkes KR. The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and its correlates. British Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1982;21(1):1–16 4. Dweck, C. S., & Reppucci, N. D. (1973). Learned helplessness and reinforcement responsibility in children. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 25(1), 109. 5. Educational Review, 59:4, 415 – 427 6. Hillyard, S. A., & Kutas, M. (1983). Electrophysiology of cognitive processing. Annual review of psychology, 34(1), 33-61. 7. Hiroto, D. S., & Seligman, M. E. (1975). Generality of learned helplessness in man. Journal of personality and social psychology, 31(2), 311. 8. Hodkinson, P, Biesta G and James D 2007 'Understanding learning cultures', 9. Kassin, S. M., & Kiechel, K. L. (1996). The social psychology of false confessions: Compliance, internalization, and confabulation. Psychological Science, 7(3), 125-128. 10. Maier, S. F., & Seligman, M. E. (1976). Learned helplessness: Theory and evidence. Journal of experimental psychology: general, 105(1), 3. 11. Merckelbach H, Muris P, Nijman H, de Jong PJ. Self-reported cognitive failures and neurotic symptomatology. Personality and Individual Differences. 1996;20(6):715–724 12. Meyer, D. E., Osman, A. M., Irwin, D. E., & Yantis, S. (1988). Modern mental chronometry. Biological psychology, 26(1-3), 3-67. 13. Payne, T. W., & Schnapp, M. A. (2014). The Relationship between Negative Affect and Reported Cognitive Failures. Depression Research and Treatment,2014, 396195. http://doi.org/10.1155/2014/396195 14. Posner, M. I., & Rueda, M. R. (2002). Mental chronometry in the study of individual and group differences. Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, 24(7), 968-976. 15. Wallace JC, Kass SJ, Stanny CJ. The cognitive failures questionnaire revisited: dimensions and correlates.The Journal of General Psychology. 2002;129(3):238–256. 16. Hultén, M. A. J. (1974). Chiasma distribution at diakinesis in the normal human male. Hereditas, 76(1), 55-78. 17. Le Boeuf, B. J. (1974). Male-male competition and reproductive success in elephant seals. American Zoologist, 14(1), 163-176. 18. Geary, D. C. (1998). Male, female: The evolution of human sex differences. American Psychological Association. 19. Elbadawi, E., & Sambanis, N. (2000). Why are there so many civil wars in Africa? Understanding and preventing violent conflict. Journal of African Economies, 9(3), 244-269. 20. Reynal-Querol, M. (2002). Ethnicity, political systems, and civil wars.Journal of Conflict Resolution, 46(1), 29-54. 21. Fearon, J. D., & Laitin, D. D. (2003). Ethnicity, insurgency, and civil war.American political science review, 97(01), 75-90. 22. Bleaney, M., & Dimico, A. (2009). Ethnic Diversity and Local Conflicts.University of Nottingham School of Economics Discussion Paper, (09-04). 23. Garcia-Montalvo, J., & Reynal-Querol, M. (2004). Ethnic polarization, potential conflict, and civil wars. Potential Conflict, and Civil W-a-rs (July 2004). 24. Tatum, B. (1992). Talking about race, learning about racism: The application of racial identity development theory in the classroom. Harvard Educational Review, 62(1), 1-25. 25. Myers-Lipton, S. J. (1996). Effect of a comprehensive service-learning program on college students’ level of modern r-a-c-i-s-m. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 3(1), 44-54. 26. Lutze, F. E., & Brody, D. C. (1999). Mental abuse as cruel and unusual punishment: Do boot camp prisons violate the eighth amendment?. Crime & Delinquency, 45(2), 242-255. 27. Galtung, J., & Höivik, T. (1971). Structural and direct violence: A note on operationalization. Journal of Peace Research, 8(1), 73-76. 28. Farmer, P., Bourgois, P., ScheperHughes, N., Fassin, D., Green, L., Heggenhougen, H. K., & Farmer, P. (2004). An anthropology of structural violence 1. Current anthropology, 45(3), 305-325. 29. Farmer, P. (1996). On suffering and structural violence: a view from below.Daedalus, 261-283.
Views: 381 Cheeky Bastard
Belief Perseverance - A Nerdfighter's Attempt
 
09:36
My attempt at a Vlogbrothers-esque video talking about psychological belief perseverance. Material taken from a literature review I wrote on the topic. My references are below. Thanks to John and Hank Green for the inspiration! Enjoy! Sound clip from Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back - Copyright Lucasfilm, Ltd.; distributed by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. {Permission granted under Fair Use doctrine for Satire/Parody and Educational purposes.} Anderson, C., Lepper, M., & Ross, L. (1980). Perseverance of Social Theories: The Role of Explanation in the Persistence of Discredited Information. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39(6), 1037-1049. Asch, S. (1951). Effects of Group Pressure on the Modification and Distortion of Judgments. Groups, Leadership, and Men, 177-190. Beaulieu, P., & Reinstein, A. (2010). Belief perseverance among accounting practitioners regarding the effect of non-audit services on auditor independence. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, 29(4), 353-373. Betsch, C., Bohm, R., & Chapman, G. (2015). Using Behavioral Insights to Increase Vaccination Policy Effectiveness. Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 2(1), 61-73. Bui, N. (2014). I don’t believe it! Belief perseverance in attitudes toward celebrities. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 3(1), 38-48. Drake, R. (1983). Toward a Synthesis of Some Behavioral and Physiological Antecedents of Belief Perseverance. Social Behavior and Personality, 11(2), 57-60. Greitemeyer, T. (2004). Article retracted, but the message lives on. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(2), 557-561. Johnson, H., & Seifert, C. (1994). Sources of the Continued Influence Effect: When Misinformation in Memory Affects Later Inferences. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 20(6), 1420-1436. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.20.6.1420 Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking, Fast and Slow. New York, New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux. Koller, M. (1993). Rebutting accusations: When does it work, when does it fail? European Journal of Social Psychology, 23, 373-389. Lepper, M., Ross, L., & Lau, R. (1986). Persistence of Inaccurate Beliefs about the Self: Perseverance Effects in the Classroom. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50(3), 482-491. Majima, Y. (2015). Belief in Pseudoscience, Cognitive Style, and Science Literacy. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 29(4), 552-559. Milgram, S. (1963). Behavioral Study of Obedience. The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 67(4), 371-378. Nestler, S. (2010). Belief perseverance: The role of accessible content and accessibility experiences. Social Psychology, 41(1), 35-41. Nisbett, R.E., & Ross, L. (1980). Human inference: Strategies and shortcomings of social judgment. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall Ross, L., Lepper, M., & Hubbard, M. (1975). Perseverance in self-perception and social perception: Biased attributional processes in the debriefing paradigm. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 32(5), 880-892. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.neu.edu/psycinfo/docview/614280825/fulltextPDF/3B621D629D1945A2PQ/2?accountid=12826 Wakefield, A., et al. (1998). Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. The Lancet, 351(9103). Wicklund, R., & Brehm, J. (1976). Perspectives on cognitive dissonance (p. 238). Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Views: 445 SC13TheShades
Aphorisms by Tom Reiner Performed by Iron Giant Percussion
 
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Tom Reiner is a professor of psychology at Troy University in Montgomery, Alabama. He earned his doctorate in experimental psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno. His area of academic research is in music perception. He has published music perception research in the Journal for Scientific Psychology. He is also a member of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition and has served as an article reviewer for Psychology of Music and the Journal of Music Research Online. He studied music composition with Stephen Blumberg at California State University, Sacramento and with Joseph T. Spaniola at the University of West Florida. He has had works performed at Pensacola ComposerFest since 2011 and is a current member of the Birmingham Art Music Alliance. Additional information about the composer can be found by visiting his website at www.songwritingplace.com.
Psychology Review: Evaluating studies
 
02:30
Matt Jarvis discusses ways to evaluate psychology studies
Views: 2489 PhilipAllanMagazines
Can You See These Optical Illusions?
 
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Can you see what I see? We all experience things subjectively, including how we perceive optical illusions. SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! Click here: http://ow.ly/rt5IE Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. BrainCraft is written and hosted by Vanessa Hill (https://twitter.com/nessyhill) for PBS Digital Studios Sound design: Joel Werner (http://joelwerner.com) Follow BrainCraft on Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill or https://twitter.com/Brain_Craft Tumblr http://braincraft.tumblr.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Braincraft Google+ https://www.google.com/+braincraftvideo More episodes: Food Nostalgia http://youtu.be/LlAEJGxv5_4 Why do we feel MIND-BLOWN? http://youtu.be/AL3qLBXLRVM References: Schwarzkopf, D. S., Song, C., & Rees, G. (2010). The surface area of human V1 predicts the subjective experience of object size. Nature neuroscience,14(1), 28-30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3012031/ Dakin, S., & Frith, U. (2005). Vagaries of visual perception in autism. Neuron,48(3), 497-507. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16269366 de Fockert, J., Davidoff, J., Fagot, J., Parron, C., & Goldstein, J. (2007). More accurate size contrast judgments in the Ebbinghaus Illusion by a remote culture. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33(3), 738. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17563234 Brugger, P. & Brugger, S. The Easter Bunny in October: Is it disguised as a duck? Perceptual and Motor Skills 76, 577-578 (1993). Schwarzkopf, D. S., Song, C., & Rees, G. (2010). The surface area of human V1 predicts the subjective experience of object size. Nature neuroscience,14(1), 28-30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3012031/ Dakin, S., & Frith, U. (2005). Vagaries of visual perception in autism. Neuron,48(3), 497-507. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16269366 de Fockert, J., Davidoff, J., Fagot, J., Parron, C., & Goldstein, J. (2007). More accurate size contrast judgments in the Ebbinghaus Illusion by a remote culture. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33(3), 738. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17563234 Brugger, P. & Brugger, S. The Easter Bunny in October: Is it disguised as a duck? Perceptual and Motor Skills 76, 577-578 (1993). Music by Podington Bear: "Call Now": http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/Upbeat/CallNow "Sneaker Chase": http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/Upbeat/CallNow "Oui": http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/none_given_1790/Oui
Views: 630269 BrainCraft
JEP- Article Submission
 
09:00
Tutorial on how to submit articles to the Journal of Experimental Psychopathology.
Views: 23 TextrumLtd
The Psychology of Colour, Emotion and Online Shopping
 
04:10
SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! Click here: http://ow.ly/rt5IE Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. New video every other week! Follow BrainCraft on Google+ https://www.google.com/+braincraftvideo Tumblr http://braincraft.tumblr.com Twitter https://twitter.com/Brain_Craft Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Braincraft Instagram http://instagram.com/brain_craft Check out some of my other videos! Your Brain's Facial Recognition Technology: http://youtu.be/qu7ssnK7UW8 Your Warped Perception of Time: http://youtu.be/5my9udw5_H4 BrainCraft is created by Vanessa Hill, https://twitter.com/nessyhill Thanks to Scott MacInnis, Kimberley McEwan, Kathleen Hill and my wonderful Nana for voicing the quotes in this video. References: Babin, B. J., Hardesty, D. M., & Suter, T. A. (2003). Color and shopping intentions: the intervening effect of price fairness and perceived affect. Journal of Business Research, 56(7), 541-551. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296301002466 Bellizzi, J. A., & Hite, R. E. (1992). Environmental color, consumer feelings, and purchase likelihood. Psychology & marketing, 9(5), 347-363. Brengman, M., & Geuens, M. (2003). The four dimensional impact of color on shoppers' emotions (No. 03/204). Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. Cheng, F. F., Wu, C. S., & Yen, D. C. (2009). The effect of online store atmosphere on consumer's emotional responses--an experimental study of music and colour. Behaviour & Information Technology, 28(4), 323-334. http://www.megantegtmeyer.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/color-conversion.pdf Crowley, A. E. (1993). The two-dimensional impact of color on shopping. Marketing letters, 4(1), 59-69. Dagher, A. (2007). Shopping centers in the brain. Neuron, 53(1), 7-8. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0896627306009998 von Goethe, J. W. (1810). Theory of Colours (book) https://archive.org/stream/goethestheoryco01goetgoog#page/n360/mode/2up Hemphill, M. (1996). A note on adults' color--emotion associations. The Journal of genetic psychology, 157(3), 275-280. Knutson, B., Rick, S., Wimmer, G. E., Prelec, D., & Loewenstein, G. (2007). Neural predictors of purchases. Neuron, 53(1), 147-156. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0896627306009044 Turley, L. W., & Milliman, R. E. (2000). Atmospheric effects on shopping behavior: a review of the experimental evidence. Journal of Business Research, 49(2), 193-211. http://ec.iem.cyut.edu.tw/drupal/sites/default/files/Turley_2000_Journal-of-Business-Research.pdf Music: Brittle Rille and Mining by Moonlight by Kevin MacLeod/http://incompetech.com Sounds: Fast forward by Muska666/http://soundbible.com/624-Fast-Forward.html Images: Wikimedia commons Jirka/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spectre_detail.png http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Old_television_set.png Vladimir Kirakosyan/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SAS_Supermarket_-_interior-5.jpg 4028mdk09/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maul_einer_Zwergziege.JPG 1-1111/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:20050501_1315_2558-Bimetall-Zeigerthermometer.jpg BD Barcelona/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sofa_dali.jpg Kreecher/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Godiva_belgian_chocolate_golden_box_24.JPG chensiyuan/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1_times_square_night_2013.jpg
Views: 110281 BrainCraft
Fast Forward Science 2017 | How To: Economic Field Experiments
 
10:42
Feldforschung, so dachte ich, machen Menschen mit Fedora und Peitsche à la Indiana Jones. Dementsprechend ahnungslos war ich, als ich in Namibia landete. Heute möchte ich euch meine Perspektive als Neuling in der Feldforschung zeigen. Mit welchen Herausforderungen wir konfrontiert wurden und wie viel Spaß es machen kann so zu forschen! Im Video sage ich "Wir" ohne zu erklären wen ich meine: Ich war Teil des SASSCAL-Projekts, das sich aus Forscherinnen und Forschern aus verschiedenen Ländern und unterschiedlichen wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen zusammensetzt:The Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management (SASSCAL) is a joint initiative of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, and Germany in response to the challenges of global change. ( http://www.sasscal.org/ ) Vor Ort waren wir 6 Personen: Chris (PhD Student), Moses, Cypriaan, James und (nach dem Videodreh) auch Ana (die lokalen Assistent*innen deren Kompetenzen weit über Kommunikation, Übersetzung und Kulturvermittlung hinausgingen) und ich (Studentische Hilfskraft). Dieses Video ist für den Fast Forward Science Videowettbewerb 2017 angemeldet. Mehr Infos findet Ihr hier: http://www.fastforwardscience.de/ Dinge die ich im Video anspreche: # Einführung zu Ökonomischer Feldforschung: Levitt, Steven D., and John A. List. "Field experiments in economics: The past, the present, and the future." European Economic Review 53.1 (2009): 1-18 https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/646e/3d5373e48bd23615dbb0d3a874360a58dd04.pdf # Randomized Controlled Trial: Wiki: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randomisierte_kontrollierte_Studie TED Talk Esther Duflo: https://www.ted.com/talks/esther_duflo_social_experiments_to_fight_poverty?language=de # Randomisieren und Selection Bias: Wiki: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randomisiertes_Experiment https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stichprobenverzerrung # Whiteman Effect: Cilliers, Jacobus, Oeindrila Dube, and Bilal Siddiqi. "The white-man effect: How foreigner presence affects behavior in experiments." Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 118 (2015): 397-414 http://odube.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/White_man_effect.pdf # Forschungsstand: Frey und Bohnet fanden heraus, dass Kommunikation das „soziale“ Verhalten der Teilnehmer*innen in Diktator-Spielen und in Gefangenendilemmata erhöht. Frey, Bruno S., and Iris Bohnet. "Cooperation, communication and communitarianism: an experimental approach." Journal of Political Philosophy4.4 (1996): 322-336. http://www.bsfrey.ch/articles/C_277_1996.pdf Die beiden letzteren verglichen 1999 drei unterschiedliche Level von Kommunikation und fanden einen Zusammenhang zwischen steigender Kommunikation und erhöhter Kooperation. Bohnet, Iris, and Bruno S. Frey. "The sound of silence in prisoner's dilemma and dictator games." Journal of economic behavior & organization 38.1 (1999): 43-57. http://econweb.ucsd.edu/~jandreoni/Econ264/papers/Bohnet%20Frey%20JEBO%201999.pdf Dawes et al. teilten Ihre Teilnehmer*innen in vier Kommunikationsgruppen auf: 1. Keine Kommunikation, 2. Irrelevante Kommunikation, 3. Relevante Kommunikation und 4. Nicht-verpflichtende Verkündung des Spielverhaltens. Treatment drei und vier haben die Kooperatio stark positiv beeinflusst. Dawes, Robyn M., Jeanne McTavish, and Harriet Shaklee. "Behavior, communication, and assumptions about other people's behavior in a commons dilemma situation." Journal of personality and social psychology 35.1 (1977): 1. Anmerkung: Desertifikation ist im Kavango, der Region in der wir geforscht haben, keine relevante Gefahr. Wälder schützen Land aber unter anderem auch vor Bodendegradation und Desertifikation. Musik: Myspace – kimengumi Wings – Nicolai Heidlas Feder - Goodbye (Vijay & Sofia Zlatko Remix) Kartendaten: Google, DigitalGlobe 2017.
Views: 1572 Adrian Kartoffel
CogNovo Workshop on Experimental Methods: Designing an experiment
 
01:35:36
Afternoon session of Day 1 (23/06/14) of the 2nd CogNovo workshop: Experimental Methods István Winkler: Designing an experiment: From conception to execution Institute for Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary In an interactive session, we shall focus on one aspect of experimental design: controls. Having a great idea often blinds one to two aspects of experimental research: 1) how to plan for the case when the outcome of the experiment differs from one's expectations and 2) what are the possible alternative interpretations of the expected results (including dealing with confounds). Both issues require control procedures to be included in the experiment. Although controls often make the initially simple design more complex, they usually pay for the invested effort by allowing one to draw stronger conclusions (and to publish the study without a lot of additional work). In addition to going through an example of testing whether auditory features are conjoined without focused attention, participants will have the chance to discuss their own research with respect to these issues. http://www.cognovo.eu http://www.cogpsyphy.hu/~iwinkler/
Views: 98 PlymouthCognition
Milgram experiment
 
26:02
The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. They measured the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience. Milgram first described his research in 1963 in an article published in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology and later discussed his findings in greater depth in his 1974 book, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View. The experiments began in July 1961, three months after the start of the trial of German Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem. Milgram devised his psychological study to answer the popular question at that particular time: "Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the Holocaust were just following orders? Could we call them all accomplices?" The experiments have been repeated many times in the following years with consistent results within differing societies, although not with the same percentages across the globe. The experiments were also controversial and considered by some scientists to be unethical and physically or psychologically abusive. Psychologist Diana Baumrind considered the experiment "harmful because it may cause permanent psychological damage and cause people to be less trusting in the future." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1043 Audiopedia
The Myth Of Modern Racism Amongst Men Remastered: Part One
 
04:56
This will be a video article what will be of particular interest to MGTOW's, MRA’s and Anonymous activists. It covers perceived racism amongst men, and the reason why men do not understand the difference between racism and sexism under the context of competition. I have remastered it And separated it into to easier to digests and to increase comprehension. Turd Flinging Monkey; The Enemies of Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3Ks2T_P9Kk See Black Pigeon Speaks; Diversity DESTROYS Social Cohesion in the West: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTROCGb5qj8 References 1. Abramson, L. Y., Seligman, M. E., & Teasdale, J. D. (1978). Learned helplessness in humans: critique and reformulation. Journal of abnormal psychology, 87(1), 49. 2. Bechtel, W. (2014). Cognitive biology: surprising model organisms for cognitive science. In Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: Cognitive Science Society (pp. 158-163). 3. Broadbent DE, Cooper PF, FitzGerald P, Parkes KR. The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and its correlates. British Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1982;21(1):1–16 4. Dweck, C. S., & Reppucci, N. D. (1973). Learned helplessness and reinforcement responsibility in children. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 25(1), 109. 5. Educational Review, 59:4, 415 – 427 6. Hillyard, S. A., & Kutas, M. (1983). Electrophysiology of cognitive processing. Annual review of psychology, 34(1), 33-61. 7. Hiroto, D. S., & Seligman, M. E. (1975). Generality of learned helplessness in man. Journal of personality and social psychology, 31(2), 311. 8. Hodkinson, P, Biesta G and James D 2007 'Understanding learning cultures', 9. Kassin, S. M., & Kiechel, K. L. (1996). The social psychology of false confessions: Compliance, internalization, and confabulation. Psychological Science, 7(3), 125-128. 10. Maier, S. F., & Seligman, M. E. (1976). Learned helplessness: Theory and evidence. Journal of experimental psychology: general, 105(1), 3. 11. Merckelbach H, Muris P, Nijman H, de Jong PJ. Self-reported cognitive failures and neurotic symptomatology. Personality and Individual Differences. 1996;20(6):715–724 12. Meyer, D. E., Osman, A. M., Irwin, D. E., & Yantis, S. (1988). Modern mental chronometry. Biological psychology, 26(1-3), 3-67. 13. Payne, T. W., & Schnapp, M. A. (2014). The Relationship between Negative Affect and Reported Cognitive Failures. Depression Research and Treatment,2014, 396195. http://doi.org/10.1155/2014/396195 14. Posner, M. I., & Rueda, M. R. (2002). Mental chronometry in the study of individual and group differences. Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, 24(7), 968-976. 15. Wallace JC, Kass SJ, Stanny CJ. The cognitive failures questionnaire revisited: dimensions and correlates.The Journal of General Psychology. 2002;129(3):238–256. 16. Hultén, M. A. J. (1974). Chiasma distribution at diakinesis in the normal human male. Hereditas, 76(1), 55-78. 17. Le Boeuf, B. J. (1974). Male-male competition and reproductive success in elephant seals. American Zoologist, 14(1), 163-176. 18. Geary, D. C. (1998). Male, female: The evolution of human sex differences. American Psychological Association. 19. Elbadawi, E., & Sambanis, N. (2000). Why are there so many civil wars in Africa? Understanding and preventing violent conflict. Journal of African Economies, 9(3), 244-269. 20. Reynal-Querol, M. (2002). Ethnicity, political systems, and civil wars.Journal of Conflict Resolution, 46(1), 29-54. 21. Fearon, J. D., & Laitin, D. D. (2003). Ethnicity, insurgency, and civil war.American political science review, 97(01), 75-90. 22. Bleaney, M., & Dimico, A. (2009). Ethnic Diversity and Local Conflicts.University of Nottingham School of Economics Discussion Paper, (09-04). 23. Garcia-Montalvo, J., & Reynal-Querol, M. (2004). Ethnic polarization, potential conflict, and civil wars. Potential Conflict, and Civil Wars (July 2004). 24. Tatum, B. (1992). Talking about race, learning about racism: The application of racial identity development theory in the classroom. Harvard Educational Review, 62(1), 1-25. 25. Myers-Lipton, S. J. (1996). Effect of a comprehensive service-learning program on college students’ level of modern racism. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 3(1), 44-54. 26. Lutze, F. E., & Brody, D. C. (1999). Mental abuse as cruel and unusual punishment: Do boot camp prisons violate the eighth amendment?. Crime & Delinquency, 45(2), 242-255. 27. Galtung, J., & Höivik, T. (1971). Structural and direct violence: A note on operationalization. Journal of Peace Research, 8(1), 73-76. 28. Farmer, P., Bourgois, P., ScheperHughes, N., Fassin, D., Green, L., Heggenhougen, H. K., & Farmer, P. (2004). An anthropology of structural violence 1. Current anthropology, 45(3), 305-325. 29. Farmer, P. (1996). On suffering and structural violence: a view from below.Daedalus, 261-283.
Views: 159 Cheeky Bastard

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