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How Exchange Rates Work
 
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● We explain topics simply. So Subscribe if you want to learn while being entertained. ✔ Please like the video and comment if you enjoyed - it helps a lot! ▶ If you want a question answered then ask in the comments and we may make a video about it! About the video: You may have traveled a lot and wondered why you get more of one currency when you exchange it for another. If so, you have witnessed exchange rates in action, but do you know how they work? Watch the video to find out what exchange rates are, how to convert between them and the different systems which determine a currencies exchange rate. Historically the gold standard system had been used, which fixed currency to a select value of gold, held in a vault. The three main systems are the floating, managed and fixed exchange rate systems. The floating system has minimal government intervention, using supply and demand to determine the exchange rate. The managed exchange rate is allowed to be within a permitted band and a fixed exchange rate is usually pegged to a currency with the interest of being competitive in the international market. The video explains this in more detail and with helpful picture to guide you through the subject.
Views: 374758 SimplyExplain
#72, Foreign exchange rate (Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics ..... Foreign exchange rate.... Foreign exchange.... Types of foreign exchange rate ..... Depreciation and appreciation of currency.... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 72 Our books are now available on Amazon Special Combo - Economics on your tips Micro + Macro http://amzn.in/d/eSxj5Ui Economics on your tips Macroeconomics http://amzn.in/d/2AMX85O Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 357051 Economics on your tips
(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates
 
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How do currency values rise and fall? Why would a country want to manipulate the value of its own currency? "(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates" by Dr. Mary J. McGlasson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Views: 221738 mjmfoodie
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 937301 CrashCourse
What is Exchange Rate : Explained with Animation
 
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This Video Explains the following: 1)Exchange Rates. 2)Why the value of Currency Fluctuates. 3)How the value of a currency is decided. 4)How Demand of Goods influences the Value of a Currency. For More Animated Explanations under 5 minutes, Subscribe to Science Digest. (Suggestions/Errors, please let us know. We appreciate it.)
Views: 70001 Science Digest
Fixed exchange rates
 
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In this video you will learn how fixed exchange rate systems work, their advantages and disadvantages and what is meant by devaluation and revaluation.
Views: 4687 EnhanceTuition
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 78216 Investopedia
Exchange Rate Determination
 
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Free app! Access all videos on this channel by putting myapp.is/Economics%20Diagrams into your phone browser and follow the instructions This video looks at how exchange rates are determined through the supply and demand of a currency in the Foreign Exchange (FOREX) market
Views: 43711 Steve Lobsey
What are Exchange rates ?
 
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Exchange rates are the price of one country's' currency in relation to another. Reference: http://stats.oecd.org/glossary/detail.asp?ID=877 Created at http://www.b2bwhiteboard.com
Views: 351 B2Bwhiteboard
Word of the Day: Currency Peg
 
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Watch more Capital Account @ http://www.youtube.com/CapitalAccount http://twitter.com/laurenlyster http://twitter.com/coveringdelta A currency peg, otherwise referred to as a fixed exchange rate, is a type of exchange system wherein a currency's value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. The most readily well-known "currency manipulator" is China, which pegs the yuan to the us dollar. Their's is a flexible peg, but a peg nonetheless, and we look at this during our word of the day, as well as the case of Argentina. These are two very different types of currency pegs. In the case of the yuan, China artificially undervalues their currency relative to the dollar, in an effort to cheapen their exports and drive growth with sales to the US and other countries. This is an export led growth model, facilitated by a cheap currency. The people's bank of china achieves this buy regularly going out into the open market and buying us dollars in return of chinese yuan. This helps to push down the value of the yuan relative to the dollar, cheapening the chinese currency, but also causing inflation domestically because china has to print all this extra money in order to soak up the USD it buys. When a country like china loosens it's peg, its currency will naturally rise. In the case of Argentina, the central bank in that country was keeping its currency artificially high relative to the USD. When Argentina headed into depression during the early 2000's it became increasingly difficult for the country to maintain the peg, because in the case of countries that are artificially increasing the value of their currency, the national central bank had to intervene in the market by selling foreign exchange reserve in return for pesos. This had its limits, since the Argentinian central bank only had so many reserves to sell. The advantage of having a strong and stable currency, as was the case in Argentina throughout the 90's is that it attracts a lot of foreign capital. However, when times get tough, a lot of that capital can leave and then you can find yourself bankrupt very quickly.
Views: 9431 RT America
Exchange Rates Unit:  Managed Exchange Rate System
 
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Your IB Economics Course Companion! This is video 7 of 10 videos in “The Exchange Rates Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkH_sdGVbD8ADVwIApVuVIMe As a teacher of IB Economics in Santiago, Chile, these videos were created to help Standard Level students navigate their way through their two-year course of study. I have made these videos public in the hope that they might be helpful to other economics students around the world. It is important to note that I use Jocelyn Blink and Ian Dorton's "IB Economics Course Companion" as the primary text in class. As a result, many of these videos use this text as source material. I have found it to be an excellent resource for students. Another source you may find helpful is Jason Welker’s site www.econclassroom.com. Welker’s site and course companions are excellent and have served as another source for these videos. Thank you Jocelyn, Ian, and Jason. I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of IB Economics and please let me know if you have any suggestions to improve them. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright . Follow on Twitter: IB Specific News and Analysis Daily! https://twitter.com/econ_ib . Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/econcoursecompanion/
Views: 2058 Econ Course Companion
L3/P2: Rupee Devaluation & Exchange rate regimes
 
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Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: - if $1=50 or $1=60: who decides this exchange rate and how? - Fixed exchange rate regime: mechanism and limitations. - Floating exchange rate regime: mechanism limitations. - Difference between devaluation and depreciation of Rupee - Difference between revaluation and appreciation of rupee? - Historic trend of Indian rupee’s fall/weakening against US dollar - How does devaluation of the currency boost its exports? - Difference between NEER and REER? How does it help determining whether currency is undervalued or overvalued? - “Managed” floating extended rate regime. Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF, Bank, RBI, IBPS, SSC and other competitive exams, IIM, XLRI, MBA interviews and GDPI Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
Views: 249200 Mrunal Patel
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 519955 Khan Academy
How rupee-dollar rates are determined? Hindi Video
 
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In this short animation video, we have explained that how currency exchange rate of Indian Rupees is determined with other foreign currencies? To watch more amazing video of general knowledge in Hindi visit our website http://netpill.in -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Watch our new video "Historical story of Padmavati :: Conflict of two Emperors" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23G5Hb9lyZ8 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 440999 Netpill
Effects of a Currency Depreciation
 
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This revision tutorial video looks at some of the macroeconomic effects of a currency depreciation including the impact on the trade balance, economic growth and inflation. It includes an explanation of the J Curve and the Marshall Lerner Condition. For more help with your A Level / IB Economics, visit tutor2u Economics http://www.tutor2u.net/economics If you find this topic video helpful, please SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel For more help with Economics: Follow tutor2u Economics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tutor2uEcon - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 15460 tutor2u
What do Rising Interest Rates Mean?
 
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Interest rates are on the rise in both Canada and the U.S., what does this mean for consumers and investors? Find out with today's episode! Intro/Outro Music: https://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music Episode Music: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/
Views: 42120 The Plain Bagel
What gives a dollar bill its value? - Doug Levinson
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-gives-a-dollar-bill-its-value-doug-levinson The value of money is determined by how much (or how little) of it is in circulation. But who makes that decision, and how does their choice affect the economy at large? Doug Levinson takes a trip into the United States Federal Reserve, examining how the people who work there aim to balance the value of the dollar to prevent inflation or deflation. Lesson by Doug Levinson, animation by Qa'ed Mai.
Views: 2006662 TED-Ed
#74, Supply of foreign exchange,it's reasons and curve(Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics..... Foreign exchange rate..... Supply of foreign exchange.... Reasons for rise in supply of foreign exchange...... Supply curve of foreign exchange....... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 74 Our books are now available on Amazon Special Combo - Economics on your tips Micro + Macro http://amzn.in/d/eSxj5Ui Economics on your tips Macroeconomics http://amzn.in/d/2AMX85O Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 769041256
Views: 128874 Economics on your tips
What is Inflation?
 
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Economists constantly refer to inflation and tend to suggest it is a Very Bad Thing. But why exactly, where does it come from and what could one do to tame it? Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk Music Lanquidity by http://www.purple-planet.com #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 701432 The School of Life
Definition of exchange rate
 
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What Affects The Exchange Rate?
 
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This article examines how the krone exchange rate is influenced by factors such as long term, found to be dependent on oil. Key factors that affect foreign exchange rates compareremit. Inflation rate is declining but still on a high levels that has ve impact $ le 3rd feb. Unlike a textbook, the real world is not vaccuum and you can't manipulate single variable at time. This results in an appreciation of exchange rate rates are determined by factors, such as interest rates, confidence, current account on balance payments, economic growth and relative inflation currency is influenced many factors like employment figures, growth, trade balances, central bank actions, consumer spending 17 apr 2017 fluctuate due to a wide range interrelated but the market reaction changes rarely so straightforward. Here's the three factors that affect them 25 nov 2016 check out macroeconomic determine a country's foreign exchange rate, number plays huge role in global currency 16 sep 2013 affecting rates prepared by walid saafan. Yz rupees (originally answered holborn assets' answer to where and how are exchange rates determined? ). Fexco corporate exchange rates work? What affects them? The balance. Asp url? Q webcache. Factors that influence exchange rates investopedia articles basics 04 050704. How does monetary policy affect exchange rate? Quora. Economic factors affecting exchange rates foreign the canadian dollar what determines rate? . Factors which influence the exchange rate factors 5 rates transferwise., 2009 what is the reason behind, 1 dollar 60 or 6x. Factors influencing currency exchange rates how does inflation factors affecting slideshare. This results in higher revenue, which causes a demand for the country's currency and an increase its currency's value. Exchange rates factors affecting currency values. Infographic 6 factors that influence exchange rates. The impact of higher interest rates is mitigated, however, if inflation in the country much than others, or additional factors serve to drive currency down a country's terms trade improves its exports prices rise at greater rate imports. It's not as 10 jun 2015 in this infographic, six factors that influence the movement of foreign exchange rates are highlighted determinants rate short run. Substantial gdp growth is one main reason for introducing fiat money(currency) which, through central bank controlled monetary supply, 'creates' new money there are a few things to consider here. Factors that affect foreign exchange rates compareremit. Googleusercontent search. Consensus forecasts and analysis of currency exchange rates, that is to say its value relative foreign currencies the rate factors increase (or decrease) demand for canadian dollar, or this page discusses australian dollar within context reserve bank what determines behaviour rate? . So, for example, if a 2 jun 2017 consensus economics international surveys of exchange rate forecasts. The exchange rate and the reserve bank's role in foreig
Views: 32 Marisol Moran Tipz
What Makes Stock Prices Move Up and Down
 
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To understand what makes stocks and shares price move you must first understand a few things about the current pricing of a stock. At any given time during regular trading hours a stock has 3 values associated with it. A bid, an ask, and a current price. The bid is the highest amount someone is currently willing to pay for a share of stock, while the ask is the lowest amount someone is currently willing to accept for a share of stock. Each number will usually be shown next to the number of shares the investor is offering or asking for. The price of a stock at any given time is simply the last price a share of that stock sold for. Usually the bid and the ask are relatively close to the current share price. The difference between the bid and the ask is called the spread and it is usually healthier for a stock to have a smaller spread. Now we will talk about what makes the price of stock change. If you have ever taken a beginners economics course you probably remember learning about supply and demand. The concept is quite simple. If there is a larger supply of a product than there is demand, the price will likely drop. If there is a greater demand and not enough supply to match, than the price will probably rise. This is also true with stocks and shares. As was explained in lesson 1, the stock market is a literal market where a product, namely ownership of a company, is bought and sold. This means it runs on similar economic principles. If there are a lot of investors trying to sell a stock, and a much smaller number of investors looking to buy that same stock, the price will of the stock will begin dropping. Let’s look closer at the reasoning behind the price drop by creating a mini-market with five people; John, Jessica, Jeremy, Janet, and Jimmy. We will pretend that all five of these investors own 100 shares of stock in Company A. One day they find out that Company A messed up on a new product and it will be delayed for a year. Four of them decide to sell their shares in the company and put them up for sale. Unfortunately, due to the news, there is only one investor that is interested in buying the stock for its current price. John sells his shares, but that leaves Jessica, Jeremy, and Janet, all with shares they still would like to sell. There is nobody willing to buy at the current price, but one investor has offered to buy at a price $1 lower than the current price. Jessica sells to the investor, and the current stock price adjusts to show a current worth that is $1 less than before. If Jeremy and Janet decide to sell as well, they may push the current price even lower as they seek to find investors to purchase their shares of stock. Sometimes when a company announces extremely bad news you can see the worth of a single share of stock drop more than 50% in a single day. To learn more about the stock market and how to make money with stock try one of our stock market courses! You can learn from and interact with professional traders.
Views: 127753 Wealth Hacks
Foreign Exchange (FOREX)- Macro 5.2
 
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Mr. Clifford explains the market for foreign exchange and national currencies. If you want more practice watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DVYVfI81R8
Views: 420539 Jacob Clifford
Nominal and Real Exchange Rates
 
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An explanation of the difference between nominal and real exchange rates and why the real exchange rate is important, from a world perspective
Views: 85995 Damien King
The Money Market- Macroeconomics 4.6
 
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In this video I explain the money market graph with the the demand and supply of money. The graph is used to show the idea of monetary policy and how changing the money supply effects interest rates. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 339767 Jacob Clifford
Floating Exchange Rate Explained
 
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An Easy Overview Of Floating Exchange Rate
Views: 1020 Christopher Hunt
the relationship between the current account balance and exchange rates of RMB against USD
 
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A nation's balance of payments measures all economic transactions between that nation's people and the people of all other nations. A country that spends more on imports than it earns from the sale of its exports is said to have a trade deficit. Such imbalances have become controversial topics of debate in political and economic circles, particularly over the last decade as the Chinese economy has emerged as the world's largest exporter. As goods and services flow from one country to another, the exchange rates of those countries' currencies tend to fluctuate to promote balanced trade between the two nations. However, in some cases, most notably China, a country's central bank will intervene in the market for its own currency to manage its exchange rate against that of a trading partner. When such interventions occur, the normal, moderating effect that rising and falling exchange rates has on trade flows is disrupted, and trade imbalances can become persistent. This Video illustrates how trade flows should lead to appreciation and depreciation of currencies in a floating exchange rate system, and then explain how in the case of China, central bank policy aimed at buying large quantities of US government debt keeps the supply of Chinese currency high in the US and the demand for US dollars high in China. This means the dollar remains stronger than it otherwise might relative to the Chinese RMB, contributing to the persistent trade deficits the US exhibits in its trade with China.
Why is Rupee falling against US Dollar?
 
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"Why does dollar price go up and down?". He explained me the reason. I am going to simplify same explaination here. Lets assume there are only two international traders between India and US. - Mr Patel in Mumbai who supplies Diamond Jewelry to a store in New York. - Mr. Brown in Chicago who supplies Industrial Robots in Noida. Assume dollar price today is 45 rupees. Today Patel sold 10 piece Jewelry set to NY store, cost of each piece was 1000 dollars. Total selling amount = 10,000 dollars. Now Patel wants to convert 10,000 dollars to Rupees. If rate is 45 rupees to 1 US dollar. After conversion Patel should get 4.5 Lakh rupees. Same evening Mr. Brown from Chicago, sells one industrial robot in Noida for Rs. 2.25 lakhs. As per 45 rupees to dollar rate, Brown is expecting to convert Rs. 2.25 lakhs to 5000 US dollars. So we have -- 10,000 US dollars to be converted to rupees. [After conversion worth Rs. 4.5 Lakhs] -- Rs. 2.25 Lakhs to be converted to dollars [After conversion worth 5000 US dollars] We have a problem. Demand for Rupees is more than that for dollars. In other words for this particular trading day, there seems to be more supply of dollars than that of rupees. Patel and Brown log to Foreign Exchange website to convert their currency. First 5000 dollars gets exchanged easily. And the rate is Rs. 45 to 1 US dollars. Brown is happy he got his 2.25 lakhs converted to 5000 US dollars, he logs out of website and goes home. Patel still has more 5000 US dollars to convert in to Rupees. He got some money on credit from a friend and promised to return him on time with small interest fee. Patel also wants to pay salary to karigar (people on manufacturing floor) who manufactured jewelry for him. Patel is now desperate to convert remaining 5000 dollars to rupees. Lets add one more character in to story now. Mr Desai who runs a Travel Agency and organises tours to countries like UK, USA, Asia etc. He logs to website and sees someone waiting to exchange 5000 US dollars to rupees. Desai knows that he will need US dollars sometime next month and was looking to buy some at good price. He offers a bargain. Last price for dollar was 45 rupees, but if someone sells dollars for 43 rupees, I will buy it. Patel being in rush, agrees to sell dollars for lower price. Patel converts remaining 5000 US dollars at rate of 43 rupees. 5000 x 43 = 2.15 lakhs. Patel doesn't mind loosing small amount because he will able to make payments on time. Now latest Exchange rate is: Rs. 43 to 1 US dollar. After few weeks , Desai (Travel agent) gets a big contract to organise tour for a group of 100 people. He needs lot of dollars, he logs in to website and sees Patel ready to sell 10,000 dollars for 47 rupees. Desai desperately needs dollars, he buys it. Now excahnge rate is: Rs. 47 to 1 US dollar.
Views: 370851 MumbaiPav
What is FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE? What does FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE mean?
 
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What is FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE? What does FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE mean? FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE definition - FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE meaning - FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A foreign exchange hedge (also called a FOREX hedge) is a method used by companies to eliminate or "hedge" their foreign exchange risk resulting from transactions in foreign currencies (see foreign exchange derivative). This is done using either the cash flow hedge or the fair value method. The accounting rules for this are addressed by both the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and by the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP) as well as other national accounting standards. A foreign exchange hedge transfers the foreign exchange risk from the trading or investing company to a business that carries the risk, such as a bank. There is cost to the company for setting up a hedge. By setting up a hedge, the company also forgoes any profit if the movement in the exchange rate would be favourable to it. When companies conduct business across borders, they must deal in foreign currencies. Companies must exchange foreign currencies for home currencies when dealing with receivables, and vice versa for payables. This is done at the current exchange rate between the two countries. Foreign exchange risk is the risk that the exchange rate will change unfavorably before payment is made or received in the currency . For example, if a United States company doing business in Japan is compensated in yen, that company has risk associated with fluctuations in the value of the yen versus the United States dollar. A hedge is a type of derivative, or a financial instrument, that derives its value from an underlying asset. Hedging is a way for a company to minimize or eliminate foreign exchange risk. Two common hedges are forward contracts and options. A forward contract will lock in an exchange rate today at which the currency transaction will occur at the future date. An option sets an exchange rate at which the company may choose to exchange currencies. If the current exchange rate is more favorable, then the company will not exercise this option. The main difference between the hedge methods is who derives the benefit of a favourable movement in the exchange rate. With a forward contract the other party derives the benefit, while with an option the company retains the benefit by choosing not to exercise the option if the exchange rate moves in its favour. Guidelines for accounting for financial derivatives are given under IFRS 7. Under this standard, “an entity shall group financial instruments into classes that are appropriate to the nature of the information disclosed and that take into account the characteristics of those financial instruments. An entity shall provide sufficient information to permit reconciliation to the line items presented in the balance sheet”. Derivatives should be grouped together on the balance sheet and valuation information should be disclosed in the footnotes. This seems fairly straightforward, but IASB has issued two standards to help further explain this procedure. The International Accounting Standards IAS 32 and 39 help to give further direction for the proper accounting of derivative financial instruments. IAS 32 defines a “financial instrument” as “any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity”. Therefore, a forward contract or option would create a financial asset for one entity and a financial liability for another. The entity required to pay the contract holds a liability, while the entity receiving the contract payment holds an asset.
Views: 3407 The Audiopedia
#73, Demand of foreign exchange and demand curve(Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics. ... Foreign exchange rate... Demand of foreign exchange... Rise in demand of foreign exchange.... Demand curve of foreign exchange...... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 73 Our books are now available on Amazon Special Combo - Economics on your tips Micro + Macro http://amzn.in/d/eSxj5Ui Economics on your tips Macroeconomics http://amzn.in/d/2AMX85O Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 169014 Economics on your tips
Fixed Exchange Rate - By 2thepoint
 
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2thepoint Youtube Channel Covers UPSC /Civils/IAS /IPS /IFS Preparation Videos, UPSC Material, IAS Material, Banking Material, Indian Economy, International Relations, Indian Polity, Geography, Indian Art and Culture UPSC Videos, Civil Service Preparation Strategy. Also Visit: Website: https://www.2thepoint.in/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2thepoint.in/
Views: 167 2thepoint
1 Nominal Exchange rate
 
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Views: 4183 ecopoint
What is REVALUATION? What does REVALUATION mean? REVALUATION meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is REVALUATION? What does REVALUATION mean? REVALUATION meaning - REVALUATION pronunciation - REVALUATION definition - REVALUATION explanation - How to pronounce REVALUATION? SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Revaluation is a change in a price of a good or product, or especially of a currency, in which case it is specifically an official rise of the value of the currency in relation to a foreign currency in a fixed exchange rate system. Under floating exchange rates, by contrast, a rise in a currency's value is an appreciation. Altering the face value of a currency without changing its purchasing power is a redenomination, not a revaluation (this is typically accomplished by issuing a new currency with a different, usually lower, face value and a different, usually higher, exchange rate while leaving the old currency unchanged; then the new replaces the old). In a fixed exchange rate system, the central bank maintains an officially announced exchange rate by standing ready to buy or sell foreign currency at that rate. In general terms, revaluation of a currency is a calculated adjustment to a country's official exchange rate relative to a chosen baseline. The baseline could in principle be anything from wage rates to the price of gold to a foreign currency. In a fixed exchange rate regime, only a decision by a country's government (specifically, its central bank) can alter the official value of the currency. In contrast, a devaluation is an official reduction in the value of the currency. For example, suppose a government has set 10 units of its currency equal to one US dollar. To revalue, the government might change the rate to 9.9 units per dollar. This would result in that currency being slightly more expensive to people buying that currency with U.S. dollars than previously and the US dollar costing slightly less to those buying it with foreign currency. If the fixed value of a currency is sufficiently low, the central bank will experience an inflow of foreign currency, because foreigners will find it inexpensive to acquire the local currency from the central bank and use it to purchase locally produced goods, and so they will do a lot of that. With foreign currency flowing into its store of reserves, in principle the central bank could maintain this situation indefinitely, and indeed domestic exporters will like this situation. However, the central bank may experience political pressure from two sources to increase the value of the currency: Domestic consumers will complain that they find it expensive to acquire foreign currency with which to buy importable goods; and foreign governments, on behalf of foreign exporters, may urge such a revaluation to improve their countries' sale of exports. A revaluation of the local currency to a higher value vis-a-vis other currencies will make it less expensive for local consumers to acquire the foreign funds with which to import foreign goods, so they will do more importing. Domestic producers, on the other hand, will be able to sell fewer export goods because foreign consumers will find it more expensive to obtain the local funds with which to pay for them; so the country will export less. Thus its balance of trade will move to a smaller surplus or to a deficit, and the central bank will experience a decrease in its net inflow of foreign currency to its reserves, or even a reversal to a net outflow.
Views: 415 The Audiopedia
Barry Eichengreen: Pegged exchange rates
 
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Barry Eichengreen, an economist, compares the problems of the gold standard to those of the European Monetary System and the Eurozone. From The Economy, published free online by The CORE Project (http://core-econ.org).
Views: 2988 CORE team
Why is Dollar Rupee Exchange Rate rising? (In Gujarati)
 
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"Why does dollar price go up and down?". He explained me the reason. I am going to simplify same explaination here. Lets assume there are only two international traders between India and US. - Mr Patel in Mumbai who supplies Diamond Jewelry to a store in New York. - Mr. Brown in Chicago who supplies Industrial Robots in Noida. Assume dollar price today is 45 rupees. Today Patel sold 10 piece Jewelry set to NY store, cost of each piece was 1000 dollars. Total selling amount = 10,000 dollars. Now Patel wants to convert 10,000 dollars to Rupees. If rate is 45 rupees to 1 US dollar. After conversion Patel should get 4.5 Lakh rupees. Same evening Mr. Brown from Chicago, sells one industrial robot in Noida for Rs. 2.25 lakhs. As per 45 rupees to dollar rate, Brown is expecting to convert Rs. 2.25 lakhs to 5000 US dollars. So we have -- 10,000 US dollars to be converted to rupees. [After conversion worth Rs. 4.5 Lakhs] -- Rs. 2.25 Lakhs to be converted to dollars [After conversion worth 5000 US dollars] We have a problem. Demand for Rupees is more than that for dollars. In other words for this particular trading day, there seems to be more supply of dollars than that of rupees. Patel and Brown log to Foreign Exchange website to convert their currency. First 5000 dollars gets exchanged easily. And the rate is Rs. 45 to 1 US dollars. Brown is happy he got his 2.25 lakhs converted to 5000 US dollars, he logs out of website and goes home. Patel still has more 5000 US dollars to convert in to Rupees. He got some money on credit from a friend and promised to return him on time with small interest fee. Patel also wants to pay salary to karigar (people on manufacturing floor) who manufactured jewelry for him. Patel is now desperate to convert remaining 5000 dollars to rupees. Lets add one more character in to story now. Mr Desai who runs a Travel Agency and organises tours to countries like UK, USA, Asia etc. He logs to website and sees someone waiting to exchange 5000 US dollars to rupees. Desai knows that he will need US dollars sometime next month and was looking to buy some at good price. He offers a bargain. Last price for dollar was 45 rupees, but if someone sells dollars for 43 rupees, I will buy it. Patel being in rush, agrees to sell dollars for lower price. Patel converts remaining 5000 US dollars at rate of 43 rupees. 5000 x 43 = 2.15 lakhs. Patel doesn't mind loosing small amount because he will able to make payments on time. Now latest Exchange rate is: Rs. 43 to 1 US dollar. After few weeks , Desai (Travel agent) gets a big contract to organise tour for a group of 100 people. He needs lot of dollars, he logs in to website and sees Patel ready to sell 10,000 dollars for 47 rupees. Desai desperately needs dollars, he buys it. Now excahnge rate is: Rs. 47 to 1 US dollar.
Views: 15516 DiamondBhaiTV
What is the Gold Standard? - Learn Liberty
 
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Before 1974, U.S. dollars were backed by gold. This meant that the federal government could not print more money than it could redeem for gold. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP. While this constrained the federal government, it also provided citizens with a relatively stable purchasing power for goods and services. Today's paper currency has no intrinsic value. It is not based on the value of gold or anything else. Under a gold standard, inflation was really limited. With floating value, or fiat, currency, however, some countries have seen inflation reach extremely high levels—sometimes enough to lead to economic collapse. Gold standards have historically provided more stable currencies with lower inflation than fiat currency. Should the United States return to a gold standard? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 284283 Learn Liberty
What is CURRENCY CRISIS? What does CURRENCY CRISIS mean' CURRENCY CRISIS meaning & explanation
 
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What is CURRENCY CRISIS? What does CURRENCY CRISIS mean' CURRENCY CRISIS meaning - CURRENCY CRISIS definition - CURRENCY CRISIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A currency crisis is a situation in which serious doubt exists as to whether a country's central bank has sufficient foreign exchange reserves to maintain the country's fixed exchange rate. The crisis is often accompanied by a speculative attack in the foreign exchange market. A currency crisis results from chronic balance of payments deficits, and thus is also called a balance of payments crisis. Often such a crisis culminates in a devaluation of the currency. A currency crisis is a type of financial crisis, and is often associated with a real economic crisis. A currency crisis raises the probability of a banking crisis or a default crisis. During a currency crisis the value of foreign denominated debt will rise drastically relative to the declining value of the home currency. Financial institutions and the government will struggle to meet debt obligations and economic crisis may ensue. Causation also runs the other way. The probability of a currency crisis rises when a country is experiencing a banking or default crisis. To offset the damage resulting from a banking or default crisis, a central bank will often increase currency issuance, which can decrease reserves to a point where a fixed exchange rate breaks. The linkage between currency, banking, and default crises increases the chance of twin crises or even triple crises, outcomes in which the economic cost of each individual crisis is enlarged. Currency crises can be especially destructive to small open economies or bigger, but not sufficiently stable ones. Governments often take on the role of fending off such attacks by satisfying the excess demand for a given currency using the country's own currency reserves or its foreign reserves (usually in the United States dollar, Euro or Pound sterling). Currency crises have large, measurable costs on an economy, but the ability to predict the timing and magnitude of crises is limited by theoretical understanding of the complex interactions between macroeconomic fundamentals, investor expectations, and government policy. A currency crisis may also have political implications for those in power. Following a currency crisis a change in the head of government and a change in the finance minister and/or central bank governor are more likely to occur. There is no widely accepted definition of a currency crisis, which is normally considered as part of a financial crisis. Kaminsky et al. (1998), for instance, define currency crises as when a weighted average of monthly percentage depreciations in the exchange rate and monthly percentage declines in exchange reserves exceeds its mean by more than three standard deviations. Frankel and Rose (1996) define a currency crisis as a nominal depreciation of a currency of at least 25% but it is also defined at least 10% increase in the rate of depreciation. In general, a currency crisis can be defined as a situation when the participants in an exchange market come to recognize that a pegged exchange rate is about to fail, causing speculation against the peg that hastens the failure and forces a devaluation or appreciation. Recessions attributed to currency crises include the 1994 economic crisis in Mexico, 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, 1998 Russian financial crisis, and the Argentine economic crisis (1999-2002).
Views: 935 The Audiopedia
Managed Floating
 
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Managed Floating watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Madhu Bhatia, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
Master Stroke: Reasons Why Rupee Is At Record Low Against Dollar | ABP News
 
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Continuing its free fall for the fourth straight session, the Indian rupee today hit a record closing low of 68.79, showing a fall of 18 paise against the US dollar due to multiple headwinds like weak global cues and concerns related to inflation and fiscal slippage. The domestic currency's previous all-time closing low was 68.73, touched on November 24, 2016. The beleaguered Indian rupee crashed to breach the key psychological level of 69 in the morning trade and slipped further to hit a life-time low of 69.10, a fall of 49 paise during the volatile session today. "Weak global cues and rising oil price continued to impact domestic market sentiment while rupee declined to all time low amid concern on inflation and current account deficit... Any intervention from RBI to contain the volatility in rupee and progressing monsoon will provide some respite to domestic market in the near term," Vinod Nair, Head of Research, Geojit Financial Services Ltd, said. Mad rush for dollar was witnessed as importers see further erosion in the rupee value even as it was a field day for speculative traders before the RBI came in strongly, pumping million into the market to salvage the rupee. The rupee swung between 69.10 and 68.72 most part of the day at the interbank foreign exchange (forex) market after a gap-down opening at 68.89. The macroeconomic picture of India appears to be caught in a recurring instability against the backdrop of surging global crude prices and consistent widening in the trade deficit as well as increased pressure from capital outflows, all these leading to largely forex market turmoil. To Subscribe our YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/abpnewstv About Channel: ABP News is a news hub which provides you with the comprehensive up-to-date news coverage from all over India and World. Get the latest top stories, current affairs, sports, business, entertainment, politics, astrology, spirituality, and many more here only on ABP News. ABP News is a popular Hindi News Channel made its debut as STAR News in March 2004 and was rebranded to ABP News from 1st June 2012. The vision of the channel is 'Aapko Rakhe Aagey' -the promise of keeping each individual ahead and informed. ABP News is best defined as a responsible channel with a fair and balanced approach that combines prompt reporting with insightful analysis of news and current affairs. ABP News maintains the repute of being a people's channel. Its cutting-edge formats, state-of-the-art newsrooms commands the attention of 48 million Indians weekly. Watch Live on http://abpnews.abplive.in/live-tv ABP Hindi: http://abpnews.abplive.in/ ABP English: http://www.abplive.in/ Download ABP App for Apple: https://itunes.apple.com/in/app/abp-live-abp-news-abp-ananda/id811114904?mt=8 Download ABP App for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.winit.starnews.hin&hl=en Social Media Handles: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/abpnewstv/?hl=en Facebook ABP News (English): https://www.facebook.com/abplive/?ref=br_rs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abpnews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/abpnewstv Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+abpnews
Views: 45627 ABP NEWS
EC1002 Chapter 14 Lesson 3 - Perfect Capital Mobility [Full]
 
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Welcome to the Real Quickienomics. You are watching the full version of EC1002 Introduction to Economics Chapter 14 Lesson 3 - Perfect Capital Mobility. Key Topics: - Recap of the Balance of Payment and what Perfect Capital Mobility means. - Why does investment money flow between countries and how does this affect both economies? - How do investment money (or capital) flows affect the nominal exchange rate? - The difference between domestic and foreign interest rates and how they affect capital flows. - Deriving the Balance of Payment = 0 line and equation using the NX function and integrating it with the ISLM model. - How different degrees of capital mobility affect the BP=0 line. - Easy breakdown of analysis into 5 simple steps for economic disturbances such as fiscal and monetary policies. - Live examples of expansionary and contractionary fiscal and monetary policies in open economies with fixed and flexible exchange rate policies. (Important) - Why does capital not flow when domestic and foreign interest rates become the same.
Views: 943 Quickienomics
Dollar-to-won exchange rate falls below 1,100
 
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원•달러 환율 '1100원' 무너져 The Korean won strengthened against the greenback. The exchange rate is under 11-hundred to the dollar. Kim Hye-sung point out what contributed to the local currency closing at the highest level in more than a year. The Korean won strengthened past 1,100 against the U.S. dollar for the first time in more than a year, closing at one-thousand-97-point-five Friday. It has appreciated nearly nine percent against the greenback since the start of 2017, including a four percent rise in the last three months... thanks to easing geopolitical tensions and strong economic fundamentals. (Korean)- "Solid exports growth led to a current account surplus, meaning more U.S. dollars coming into the country. Second, the Bank of Korea is expected to raise interest rates soon, leading to a stronger won." In addition, a new currency swap deal signed between Korea and Canada on Wednesday also played a part in driving up demand for the local currency. Korea's real GDP expanded one-point-four percent on-quarter in the third quarter, nearly double market expectations. Most experts say that if the economy keeps growing at the current pace, the won will continue to appreciate. But a stronger won means more pressure for Korea's exporters, as it raises the prices of goods sold abroad. A Korean central bank official said Friday the won has appreciated quickly in a short time and that the foreign-exchange authority is closely monitoring the markets. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 373 ARIRANG NEWS
NT dollar takes a tumble, exchange rate nears NT$30 amid Iran deal crisis
 
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The Taiex has taken a hit from US President Donald Trump''s decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, with many foreign investors withdrawing money from Taiwan''s stock market, weakening the NT dollar. The Forex exchange rate hit 29.91 mid-way through trading today, but closed slightly up at 29.872. Some market analysts say the exchange rate will soon hit NT$30 to the greenback, in a hard week for squeezed importers.This grain merchant sells oats, soybean, maize, and wheat. More than 85% of his products are imported, so the sudden tumble of the NT dollar has hit him hard.Importers are suffering, and so too travelers to the States, who’ll find everything there just a bit more pricey. US withdrawal from the Iran nuclear accord, and throngs of foreign investors withdrawing funds from the Taiex, had the NT dollar taking a tumble today, sinking at one point midway through the day’s trading to 29.910, a new mid-day low for 2018. It had been mostly on the up for six months, rising to 29.069 in just two months after its low in November of 30.108.Li Chi-chanMarket analystThe rate of the NT dollar’s depreciation will speed up. I think we will easily see NT$30 this week.This analyst says that the US dollar rally and the sideways Taiex mean the local currency will continue to weaken, with the real possibility of hitting NT$30 to the greenback this week. Import merchants should brace themselves for escalating costs.
Views: 248 Formosa EnglishNews
What Happens, if 1 ₹ = 1 $ (Rupee=Dollar)
 
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Subscribe Here: - https://goo.gl/fsQayx Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/harshfacts/ My gears https://goo.gl/csuCq0 https://goo.gl/tEuBwb India's economy is the 10th largest in the world. I was really curious to find out that when will Rupee will be Equal to Dollar and I came across with the discussion on Quora about Indian Economy. Some finance people has mentioned their views on the future of how rupee will trend. So I did some research and made the video. The video is based on Mr. Balaji Viswanathan's answer on Quora, I added some things through my own study but main idea is from his answer. I knew many things before but I learned a lot in my research about Indian economy. I think there are many people who don't know exactly how economy works & always worry about why can't be 1 Rupee = 1 dollar. Here I gave a try to solve your mysterious question through a broader perspective considering the impact on Indian Economy. Anyway Enjoy. Check out the one of the discussion on Quora here. https://goo.gl/oq3Q9I Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HARSHFACTS1/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarshHIn Website: http://harshfacts.com/ Source of the Images Used. https://goo.gl/96zhEH Licenses to the content https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.en https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/ Music. Whistling_Down_the_Road https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music https://youtu.be/Q5EnvdWKlHw
Views: 4210090 HARSH FACTS
What is Inflation? (Hindi)
 
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Many times you might have heard of the term 'Inflation' in economics which is a very interesting topic.Watch this video till the end to know basically what it is. For more awesome Business videos, click here to subscribe- https://goo.gl/feR2v3 Smartphone(Camera) I use to Record_ http://fkrt.it/us0y7!NNNN Stay connected with Business Block at; Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/BusinessBlockPage/ Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/business_block/ Twitter- https://twitter.com/Business_Block Google Plus- https://plus.google.com/109642995027385576089 If you like the videos, Do share them!
Views: 132239 Business Block
2 Real Exchange rate
 
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Views: 4204 ecopoint
Simple Samachar: Why is Value of Rupee Falling Against Dollar?
 
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On Simple Samachar, Aunindyo Chakravarty explains how relative inflation between the US and India causes the value of rupee crash against the dollar. What other factors affect currency exchange rates? Has the demand for dollar in the world increased? How do stock markets affect the value of Indian currency? Watch the show. (Audio in Hindi) NDTV is one of the leaders in the production and broadcasting of un-biased and comprehensive news and entertainment programmes in India and abroad. NDTV delivers reliable information across all platforms: TV, Internet and Mobile. Subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/ndtv?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ndtv Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ndtv Download the NDTV Apps: http://www.ndtv.com/page/apps Watch more videos: http://www.ndtv.com/video?yt
Views: 107889 NDTV
What is DUTCH DISEASE? What does DUTCH DISEASE mean? DUTCH DISEASE meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is DUTCH DISEASE? What does DUTCH DISEASE mean? DUTCH DISEASE meaning - DUTCH DISEASE definition - DUTCH DISEASE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In economics, the Dutch disease is the apparent causal relationship between the increase in the economic development of a specific sector (for example natural resources) and a decline in other sectors (like the manufacturing sector or agriculture). The putative mechanism is that as revenues increase in the growing sector (or inflows of foreign aid), the given nation's currency becomes stronger (appreciates) compared to currencies of other nations (manifest in an exchange rate). This results in the nation's other exports becoming more expensive for other countries to buy, and imports becoming cheaper, making those sectors less competitive. While it most often refers to natural resource discovery, it can also refer to "any development that results in a large inflow of foreign currency, including a sharp surge in natural resource prices, foreign assistance, and foreign direct investment". The term was coined in 1977 by The Economist to describe the decline of the manufacturing sector in the Netherlands after the discovery of the large Groningen natural gas field in 1959. The classic economic model describing Dutch disease was developed by the economists W. Max Corden and J. Peter Neary in 1982. In the model, there is a non-tradable sector (which includes services) and two tradable sectors: the booming sector, and the lagging (or non-booming) tradable sector. The booming sector is usually the extraction of natural resources such as oil, natural gas, gold, copper, diamonds or bauxite, or the production of crops, such as coffee or cocoa. The lagging sector is usually manufacturing or agriculture. A resource boom affects this economy in two ways: 1. In the "resource movement effect", the resource boom increases demand for labor, which causes production to shift toward the booming sector, away from the lagging sector. This shift in labor from the lagging sector to the booming sector is called direct-deindustrialization. However, this effect can be negligible, since the hydrocarbon and mineral sectors tend to employ few people. 2. The "spending effect" occurs as a result of the extra revenue brought in by the resource boom. It increases demand for labor in the non-tradable sector (services), at the expense of the lagging sector. This shift from the lagging sector to the non-tradable sector is called indirect-deindustrialization. The increased demand for non-traded goods increases their price. However, prices in the traded good sector are set internationally, so they cannot change. This amounts to an increase in the real exchange rate. Simple trade models suggest that a country should specialize in industries in which it has a comparative advantage; so a country rich in some natural resources would be better off specializing in the extraction of those natural resources. However, other theories suggest that this is detrimental, for example when the natural resources deplete. Also, prices may decrease and competitive manufacturing cannot return as quickly as it left. This may happen because technological growth is smaller in the booming sector and the non-tradable sector than the non-booming tradable sector. Because that economy had smaller technological growth than did other countries, its comparative advantage in non-booming tradable goods will have shrunk, thus leading firms not to invest in the tradables sector.
Views: 2613 The Audiopedia
What Is The Definition Of Net Export Effect?
 
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The price level and net exports the exchange rate effect. What is the net export effect answersthe inverse relationship between exports of an economy and its price level relative to foreign a url? Q thefreedictionary net%2bexports&sa u&ved 0ahukewiww_lfgrhvahvgto8khe1gbc84chawcbkwaq&usg afqjcnhzmtwgntjtavd9ij7fzk3mntatua" target "_blank"net definition by free dictionary. Definition exports are the goods and services produced in one. See crwoding out effect), causing the country's currency to appreciate on foreign need define net export effect? Economic term effect definition. Net export effect amosweb is economics encyclonomic web pedia. To find out what is net export effect, see this explanation exports refer to the value of a country's total minus its imports. An increase in taxes would have this effect. Net exports of goods and services bureau economic analysis. A url? Q amosweb cgi bin awb_nav. Sparknotes aggregate demand shifts in the reasons for and consequences of econport effects. Exogenous effects this means that an increase in any of the four inputs to ad will result a higher quantity real output wealth effect says rise price level make people who have since net exports fall and is part ad, then overall aggregate economics homework help. Net exports, capital flows and trade balance video & lesson what is the net effect of interest rates on exports? Quora. Price level means prices for goods produced in the united statesare lower relative to foreign countries real balances effect purchases. This results in a decrease exports and an increase imports thus net the fall resulting from deficit financed fiscal stimulus. My base line answer is that the higher interest rate will attract rates on net exports? Ny times what could mean. Net exports economics definition soochliker. Similarly this term means that net exports, defined as exports less imports, is a function of the real exchange rate consumption (c), investment (i), government spending (g) and (nx, which (x) imports (i)). Net exports financial definition of net dictionary. Economy learn what net exports and balance of trade are, how they are calculated, influences them. The net export effect works like this a higher price level increases the relative of domestic exports to other countries while decreasing foreign imports from. Net exports definition of net by the free dictionary. Components of the balance payments. Explore what capital flows are in relation to wow, that is a tough one. Net export effect the economics classroom. It is used to calculate a country's aggregate expenditures, or gdp, in an open economy net export effect what does mean, definition and meaning of 8 mar 2012the price level exports the exchange rate increase spending means larger quantity goods services demanded lower u. Definition of net export effect, definition at economic glossarydefinition effect alanpediawhat is the effect? Youtube. The inverse relationship between the net exports of an economy and its price
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Why Foreign Currency Reserves Are Important – A Beginners Guide
 
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http://illuminatisilver.com http://facebook.com/illuminatisilver Why Foreign Currency Reserves Are Important Today is Sunday 18th December 2016 and we are providing an explanation as to what Foreign Currency Reserves are and why they are important. We are too well aware that many of our subscribers have differing experiences with and knowledge of; markets, foreign currencies and International currency trading issues. So as a guide for those who are perhaps less experienced in these areas we thought we would provide a brief definition and general guide as to what they are why such reserves are important and how various Governments use them. Foreign Currency Reserves (Forex Reserves) is the amount of foreign currencies that are held by the Central Bank of a country. In general use, foreign currency reserves may also include gold and IMF reserves such as SDR’s or Special Drawing Rights. 2 Main Reasons for Holding Foreign Currency Reserves are: 1. To influence the exchange Rate. With large foreign exchange reserves, a country can target a certain exchange rate. For example, suppose a country wanted to increase the value of its currency, it could sell it’s dollar reserves to buy its own currency on the foreign exchange markets. The increased demand for this currency would appreciate its value. An example of the opposite of this happening and to which President-Elect Trump has made reference during the Election campaign, is the case of China who have historically been trying to keep the Yuan undervalued by selling Yuan and buying Dollars thereby improving their export prospects to overseas markets – by flooding them with ‘cheap goods’. This is why China has so many Dollar reserves in excess of $3 trillion worth at the current time. 2. To act as a Guarantor for Liabilities such as External Debt. If a country holds substantial foreign debt, holding foreign currency reserves can help to give more confidence in the country’s ability to pay. If countries have dwindling foreign currency reserves, there is likely to be deterioration in a country’s credit worthiness. There are Problems however in holding Foreign Currency Reserves: 1. Foreign Currency Reserves are rarely sufficient to target a certain exchange rate. If speculators sell heavily, then a currency will fall despite the best efforts of a Central Bank. e.g. In 1992, the UK lost billions of pounds trying to protect the value of Sterling when it was in the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Eventually, the UK authorities had to admit defeat and devalue the pound. This was the time when the much maligned George Soros made a $1 billion in betting against the Bank of England. 2. Inflation Erodes Value. The problem with holding foreign currency reserves is that they can lose their value. Inflation erodes the value of currencies not fixed against gold for example. Therefore, a Central Bank will need to keep buying foreign reserves to maintain the same purchasing power in markets. 3. They may lose Money on Currency Changes. In theory a Central Bank can make money through the appreciation of other currencies it holds. However, many Central Banks have been losing money through the long term decline in the value of the dollar for example, though recently this situation has reversed. Knowing all of this now, hopefully when you hear that a country has embarked on a policy of selling its US Dollar foreign currency reserves, such as China has recently, rather than assuming it’s because it no longer has confidence in that currency, which many of the gold and silver pumpers would have you believe, which admittedly could be one reason, it could also be because it is trying to maintain or prop up the value of its own currency - the Yuan - for which it has exchanged those dollars or even taking profits on some of the reserves it owns, especially when the dollar is gaining strength. Please view our recent videos: Gold and Silver Update w/e 16th December 2016 https://youtu.be/ulTkoUYUoFA Ignore the Dollar Collapse Fear Mongering – Rants Illuminati Silver https://youtu.be/5iOG7-_vvF0 Gold nanotechnology and AMD - Blindness https://youtu.be/jNry9Q8aaQs Fed raises Rates - More to Come - Gold and Silver prices fall https://youtu.be/3NMz7kZf4eA Oil prices Jump 6% – Good News for Gold and Silver prices https://youtu.be/yEPyvytaV5Y Why is Donald Trump upsetting the Chinese Bear? https://youtu.be/tB_f9yO9KsI FED, Gold, Silver, Interest rates and Markets 2016 https://youtu.be/DhUGxJtDmiQ Gold and Silver Update w/e 9th December 2016 https://youtu.be/1QX6134XbPU Why Silver May Outshine Gold (cont.) https://youtu.be/tWqrbebJuZ4 ECB Extends QE but Tapers it – Gold prices rise in Euro terms. https://youtu.be/DaOKkkEn-Ug Financial Armageddon – The Final Days https://youtu.be/CNl3RCMSpOo
Views: 12596 Illuminati Silver

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