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A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
Simple Way to Use Definite and Indefinite Articles in English
 
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https://goo.gl/irtC1H ← Get Your Free English PDF lessons https://goo.gl/K9y4GZ ← Ask Alisha your question now! ↓Check how below↓ To send your question to Alisha it’s simple and will take you less than 30 seconds. Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/K9y4GZ Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account Step 3: Ask any question to Alisha and get your question answered in a video! In this video, Alisha answers 6 questions. - Which one is correct "seeking for a job" or "seeking to a job" or "seeking a job"? - I’ve noticed that sometimes we use “THAT” and sometimes not! Is there a rule when we should use ‘THAT” or is this to the discretion of the person? - What is it meaning of "You better"? - Could you please explain in a simple way when to use a definite and an indefinite article? - I wanted you to tell me the meaning of ''smartypantsmacgee''. - 1.'-why is the double ""o"" sound in floor or door not like in book and look. Is there a rule? 2.- When is the letter ""i"" pronounced as ""ai,"" or with other sounds, like, signal, idiom. Is there a rule for this? 3.- When we use ""do"" or ""make""?, what is the difference? You've got questions about life in the United States, American culture, or any English related questions you don’t want to sift through textbooks for the answer? Your favourite English teacher Alisha takes the questions you've been asking and lay them out in an easy-to-follow format. Turn those question marks into exclamation points and get on with your English study. Interact with Alisha to clear up any confusion you have or just satisfy your curiosity. Not only you’ll be able to send questions but also power up your language with your free lifetime account. Learning English is made easy for you. Follow and write to us for more free content: ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101
Articles A, An and The | Easy Way to Learn Articles A, an and The | Simple Tricks.Part 48.
 
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#useofarticleinenglish#useofaantheinenglishgrammar Faceboo page link https://www.facebook.com/Taukir-Alam-Life-Changing-Videos-In-Hindi-1946083169039804/ Join & support me https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCN2nVLRL3h9uRGzkx5a2XQ/join Be ( is, am, are, was, were, shall, will) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA119P5kcfwaxn6sT_OOpxZ8wm PRONUNCIATION &"SILENT LETTERS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA119sDRYmUWITsbsjGjtOiU0Q A, AN & THE https://youtu.be/OACqq2uieuY All Tenses https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_rbjxG9qk7BACT-MOy88Qr PREPOSITIONS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_f5mrjVRVwy2_4fcl-Njiw ACTIVE VOICE/ PASSIVE VOICE https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_ZwnZaQ8_-Jv2BVjR7mLDG CONJUNCTIONS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA118bdrxxLWwQBDLsVKiRis9M VOCABULARY https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_BuXAwqQiTOjq3SREjqUc6 #articlesaandan#useoftheinenglish
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 512982 Learn English Lab
Articles A/AN/THE, where and how to use Articles, Basic English
 
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Learn sentence formation with the help of Articles. Correct grammar usage alongwith where and when to use Articles.
Views: 455 Moose Crypto
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
How to Use TO & FOR ⚡️English Prepositions | Common Grammar Mistakes
 
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TO & FOR 🤔 These English prepositions can be confusing! Today, you'll practise how to use the prepositions 'to' and 'for' correctly in English sentences. https://youtu.be/soN1qPcSDVo Then watch 👆10 COMMON GRAMMAR MISTAKES English learners make! (HINT: Using prepositions is one of them!) Want to keep watching? Here are some other mmmEnglish lessons about prepositions: Prepositions of PLACE: https://youtu.be/XzkbcWh8s4w Prepositions of TIME: https://youtu.be/k8JRYf8vy2A Study the 10 MOST COMMON GRAMMAR MISTAKES that English learners make 👉 https://youtu.be/soN1qPcSDVo Read the full transcript of this lesson on my blog here: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2019/01/10/how-to-use-to-and-for-english-prepositions/ English Language Tools I recommend! ⭐️Improve your English pronunciation and expression by imitating a native English speaker: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Find mmmEnglish here: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRi... TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=HVDh-iifKAs Your name will be featured underneath the video 😝
Views: 198978 mmmEnglish
Things You Did Not Know The Use Of
 
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For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FactsVerse Twitter: https://twitter.com/FactsVerse Instagram: https://instagram.com/factsverse/ For more videos and articles visit: http://factsverse.com Music: Kevin MacLeod Image Credits : Narrated by : Darren Marlar www.MarlarHouse.com
Views: 24033234 Facts Verse
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 462322 DiveIn Learning
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w
Views: 187104 Siraj Raval
Prepositions of PLACE  👉  IN / ON / AT / BY  👈  Common English Grammar Mistakes
 
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English prepositions: These tiny words are so important! But they can be a little confusing at times too, right? In this video, Emma explains how to use them when giving information about PLACE. #mmmEnglish #EnglishGrammar #EnglishGrammarTips #EnglishPrepositions #EnglishTeacher #YouTubeTeacher Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/10/03/prepositions-of-place-in-on-at-by/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=XzkbcWh8s4w mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 2177150 mmmEnglish
28 DRESSING RULES THAT EVERYONE SHOULD LEARN ONCE AND FOR ALL
 
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There are some dressing rules that are MUST KNOW! Choosing shoes for a certain dress, sunglasses for the particular face shape are just two of them. Check it out and avoid unfortunate fashion mistakes in the future! 😉 Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY: https://goo.gl/fWbJqz Subscribe to 5-Minute Workouts: https://goo.gl/67owiQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: 5-Minute Crafts KIDS: https://goo.gl/PEuLVt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/ Music: 1. Spanish Summer by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ 2. Whatdafunk by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ 3. EDM Detection Mode by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500026 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ 4. Hep Cats by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500022 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 7808638 5-Minute Crafts
HOW TO LEARN  ARTICLES FASTER-THE BEST FUN FULL WAY LEARNING VIDEO TUTORIAL FOR KIDS TO ALL
 
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Hi everyone. This video is HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH ARTICLES IN THE FUN FULL WAYS- VIDEO TUTORIAL FOR KIDS/ . We can't speak or write correctly without the using of Articles correctly. So knowledge of article is necessary.. peoples with English as their mother tongue don't have any problem in grammatically correct sentences and articles at the right places. But peoples with English as a second language CHILDREN/ STUDENTS OR ALL AGED LEARNERS. Learners face various problems while learning or using English. So in this easy but very effective video tutorial for Article learning will definitely help the learners to understand and use the articles in their day to day life situation. The lesson is explained with a lot of graphical pictures . Those are drawn by me for this teaching and learning purpose. This video can be used by the all aged groups like kids/ child/ children/ students/ college students/ job seekers/ servants and all others very effectively. Because it's each area has been explained by good and attractive hand drawn graphics(i have used my own ring photos also) For example definite article"The"having so many rules to use that article Example. 1 Article THE - should be used with the superlative degrees 1- Rose is THE most beautiful flower 2- Asia is THE BIGGEST continent in the world. So after watching this video tutorial we can get some fair knowledge about the Definite article THE And its usage. I have created all the content and graphics myself. I have had the YOUTUBE'S Music library"s free music as my videos Background Music... please share your point of views and feed back after watching this.. if you don't mind Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE My video channel Thank you very much For more videos please visit baalamuruganarul.blogspot.com Or my YouTube channel SUBSCRIBE ME IF YOU WISH THANK YOU VERY
A guide to Harvard Referencing
 
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Jonny, a student at the University of Derby, explains Harvard Referencing. He discusses how to use citations and how to reference different sources such as books, journals and websites. http://www.derby.ac.uk/studyskills http://www.derby.ac.uk/library/study-skills/citing-and-referencing
Views: 600552 University of Derby
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
12 Mistakes You Make While Charging Your Phone
 
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How to Prolong the Life of Your Battery. In case the battery of your favorite gadget can't keep up with the workload and dies too quickly you must be looking for ways how to make it last longer. people still keep doing all kinds of crazy stuff because they think it’ll extend their battery life, like throwing their phone in the freezer! We’re gonna get into this plus more common mistakes people make when it comes to charging their devices and what you can do instead to prolong your phone’s battery. It turns out you don’t really have to charge your phone to the max before using it for the first time. It’s safe to use your phone while it's charging and also okay to charge it overnight. TIMESTAMPS Charging your phone to the max before using it for the first time. 1:14 Not using your phone while it's charging. 2:15 Being afraid that chargers from a different brand will kill your battery. 3:00 Thinking that turning your phone off will damage the battery. 3:40 Trying to “train” your battery. 4:13 Not charging your phone overnight for fear of damaging the battery. 4:58 Putting the battery in the freezer to make it last longer. 5:36 Using task managers to prolong battery life. 6:09 Fearing to leave your phone charger plugged in. 6:40 Not charging laptops all the time to prevent damage. 7:21 Believing that the Internet runs your battery down the fastest. 7:55 Turning off Bluetooth, GPS, and Wi-Fi to prolong the battery life. 8:42 Tips to prolong the life of your battery: Keep batteries cool. 9:28 Store batteries with a bit of charge. 10:01 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -You’ll be perfectly fine if you just buy a phone, take it out of the box, and start using it right away. -It doesn't matter whether you’re using your phone while charging or not, it’ll still charge the same exact way. -If the charger works well enough, it won't harm your mobile device. So if you need to urgently charge your phone in an emergency or the factory charger it came with doesn't work anymore, you can get any cheap version that’s compatible with your smartphone. -If you simply shut your device off from time to time, nothing dramatic will happen. In fact, some devices may actually start working more effectively after you reboot them. -Feel free to charge your phone even if the battery is as full as 90%. Charging your phone frequently doesn't hurt the battery. -If you wanna extend your battery’s lifespan, keep it charged between 40 and 80%. Believe it or not, this actually helps the battery live the longest. -Freezing your phone does nothing more than kill the battery. The thing is that lithium-ion batteries react badly to both cold and heat. -The built-in system on your phone is already dealing with everything that should be done to keep your device’s performance in tip-top shape. As for third-party task managers, they’re actually more likely to decrease your phone’s performance. -It's perfectly safe to leave your charger plugged in unless you have a damaged charger, pets at home, or no lightning protection. -Experts recommend discharging your laptop to zero percent no more than once a month. -If you’re just surfing the Net or reading articles, it doesn’t influence your battery life any more than listening to music does. -Wi-Fi consumes even less energy than your smartphone needs to maintain the cellular data connection. -Avoid leaving your smartphone, tablet, or laptop in direct sunlight or in a hot car. And definitely don’t take your gadgets to a hot place, like the beach or sauna. -The problem with storing batteries is that they lose their charge over time. And when this charge drops to zero, your battery will automatically kill itself so that it doesn’t become unstable. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2910414 BRIGHT SIDE
Articles pt. 2 Grade 2 Teaching English The Fun Way
 
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After the class reviewed articles together on the board it was the students turn to put singular nouns on the board under the correct article: a, an, the. The students did a very good job. They know how to use articles. There was also a lot of team work and cooperation taking place. The students are often loud, but I do not want to quell their enthusiasm. In a student centered class the teacher does not determine everything, and that may include how loud the students are. I do ask them to quiet down at times if the shouting seems needless, or aggressive.
5 Tips For Writing An Awesome Blog Post
 
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Writing blog posts aren't hard. Follow these tactics and you can write an amazing blog post, fast. Subscribe here to learn more of my secret SEO tips: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=neilvkpatel Find me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neilkpatel/ Read more on my blog: https://neilpatel.com/blog/ Step #1: Take your time writing your first few blog posts - this will help you figure out what your readers like, your writing style, and the overall flow. Once you figure out your style you can templatize your blog posts. For example, mine are introduction, body, and conclusion. You also want to use headings, headings will make your content easier to read and skim. Within your headings, add keywords. Step #2: Add images - using services like Fotolia you can add images to every one of your blog posts. By adding images it makes your content easier to understand as some people are visual learners. Step #3: Set some rules - by following these rules it will make it easier to write blog posts faster. Make sure you use the words "you" and "I" within your blog. Add 7 or so images per post and keep your paragraphs shorter than 5 or 6 lines.
Views: 97450 Neil Patel
Easiest way to understand Articles (English grammar made easy)
 
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By watching this video you can learn Articles easily and can clear all your concepts.
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 735934 Learn English Lab
8 English Sentences: Find the Mistakes
 
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Can you find the mistakes in these English sentences? In today's lesson, you'll review 8 grammar rules of correct English sentences. You'll get to practice correcting sentences with me in the video. Once you learn these easy grammar rules, you'll avoid making common mistakes and improve your marks on English essays and exams like IELTS, TOEFL, and TOEIC. To test if you really understand these rules, take the quiz. Good luck with your English! http://www.engvid.com/8-english-sentences-find-the-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, my name's Rebecca. For the next few minutes, let's pretend you are the English teacher and you're correcting your student's homework. Let's look at some of these sentences and see if you can find some of the errors in these English sentences. Okay, the first sentence: "My mother she works in a bank." Is that okay? Well, let me tell you right now that actually none of these sentences are okay; there is a mistake in every sentence. So see if you can find the mistake. Okay? "My mother she works in a bank." What's the mistake? Okay... Here, "she", all right? I'm just going to grab a different marker. So what happened here is we said: "My mother she works in a bank." So we cannot repeat the subject. The mistake here is that we had a double subject; the subject was mentioned twice. In English, you can't do that. You just mention the subject once. So this sentence, in order to be correct, would need to be: "My mother works in a bank." Or: "She works in a bank." If you know who "she" is. Right? But you can't say both. So no double subjects. Number two: "John is an engineer" What's wrong with that? Look carefully. Well, what's wrong is that it's missing the punctuation. All right? Part of a correct sentence is correct punctuation. So here, there was no period at the end of the sentence, that's what was wrong. Next sentence: "The manager of my department" What's wrong with that? Well, what's wrong is that it's not a sentence because it doesn't have any verb, there's no verb there. Okay? And, of course, you need to continue this sentence, and then eventually you'd need to have some punctuation as well. But basically, there is no... This is a sentence fragment. This is called only a part of a sentence. It is not a complete English sentence or a correct English sentence. There is no verb. Missing verb. Next one: "we enjoy watching old movies." Okay? Again, look carefully. What's wrong there? Well, it has a subject, it has a verb, but this is the problem. The first letter in the first word of an English sentence has to be capitalized and that's what was missing here. You see, we didn't have that problem before. Okay. Next one: "I like very much Chinese food." Okay? Maybe that sounds okay to you, but doesn't sound okay to me. It's close, but not quite. What's wrong? Well, what's wrong here is this, the word order. Not only do you need to have certain elements, you need to have the words in the right order. So in English, the correct order for this sentence would be: "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Not: "very much Chinese food." "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Next: "Maria need help with her hw." "Maria need help with her homework." What's wrong there? Okay? So the mistake is here, the mistake is in subject-verb agreement. The verb has to agree with the subject. Right? And if we say: "Maria", it's like: "she", and we would have to say: "She needs". "Maria needs help with her hw." So the error here was in subject-verb agreement. Next one: "delivered the package yesterday" Okay? "delivered the package yesterday" What's wrong here? Well, it's similar to this one, except here, we had a sentence fragment and we had the subject. Here, we have a sentence fragment, and we have a verb, but we don't have a subject. We have a missing subject. So this is also a sentence fragment. "Fragment" means only part. It is not a complete sentence. Next one: "We recieved your letter." "We recieved your letter." Sounds fine, but if you're an English teacher, you're going to look really carefully at each of the words. And what's wrong is here, the mistake is here. It's a spelling mistake. Okay? The word "received" is one of those tricky words with the "e" and the "i", and the "i" and the "e" that you have to learn very well. So spelling mistakes will also bring down your marks. If you're doing the IELTS, if you're bring... Doing the TOEFL, any errors of this kind will bring your marks down. Okay? So even though they seem very basic, I know from experience that students make all of these mistakes. Be very careful not to make them. Let's look at what principles apply to correct English sentences. Okay? So, an English sentence must express a complete thought and it must express it with certain elements. Now, just because a sentence must express a complete thought, it doesn't have to have a lot of words; it doesn't have to be a very long sentence.
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1855187 Learn English Lab
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 2526091 Learn English Lab
ON Haitian Creole - The Definite Articles PT2 - Proper Position
 
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Support on PayPal: paypal.me/ONLanguages ON Dialects and Languages presents part 2 in our series on the "Definite Articles" in Haitian Creole. In this lesson we review the 4 definite articles used in Haitian Creole and the rules that govern when they are to be used. Then we add another layer to this lesson by reviewing examples where the definite articles are placed in other positions in a sentence and not immediately following the word it qualifies. Also we work on vocabulary building by using some Kreyòl words to give examples of the correct way to use the definite articles. Please be sure to follow through with the other parts of this lesson for a more thorough understanding this concept. Also, please see the free PDF of the lesson in the link below. Remember to practice, practice, practice. Keep up with these lessons and you will be well on your way to speaking, understanding, and having complete fluency in Haitian Creole. It's ON! Like, comment, and subscribe. For more resources and information, visit our website at: https://ondialectsandlanguages.com Free PDF of today's lesson: Coming Soon! Take our quiz and test your retention of today's phrases: Coming Soon! Support on PayPal: paypal.me/ONLanguages
15 Mistakes That Shorten the Life of Your Phone
 
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How to charge the battery correctly? Why do the phone batteries decrease so quickly? We have 15 amazing tips that will make your smartphone live a longer life! Nowadays one can hardly imagine life without a cell phone. And it happens quite often that our gadgets start to act up just half a year after we bought them. It is frustrating, but in most cases, we ourselves are to blame! Let’s face it — we don’t always handle our devices properly. TIMESTAMPS Recharge your battery more often 0:45 Don’t keep the battery charging all the time 1:24 Don’t buy cheap chargers 2:01 Be careful with «ultrafast» chargers 2:28 Remove your protective case 2:49 Drain your battery from time to time 3:10 Avoid high temperatures 3:29 Avoid cold temperatures 4:02 Avoid bright wallpaper and adjust screen brightness 4:34 Watch out for voltage fluctuations 5:19 Clean the ports and wipe the display 5:45 Keep the phone far from water 6:40 Handle your phone carefully 7:15 Avoid software updates 7:42 Use cloud storage 8:29 SUMMARY - To increase your gadget’s battery life, you should recharge it more often. The best option is to do it each time the battery power indicator drops to 10-20%. This will increase the number of discharge cycles up to 1000-1100 cycles. - An inbuilt controller stops the battery from taking more current than necessary, so there is absolutely no risk of overcharging the battery and destroying it. - There have been situations when a person was using a non-native charger, and it caused a fire in the house! And another terrible thing that can happen if you use non-native chargers and cables is getting an electric shock. - We recommend you to avoid using chargers that claim to charge your battery fully in less than an hour. - If your smartphone has a bulky protective case, it might cause the device and its battery to overheat during a lengthy recharging session. - It is recommended to discharge your phone’s battery every three months to 0% and then immediately charge it to 100% to get rid of the extremes of full charge/discharge. - A high temperature is the worst thing you can imagine for lithium-ion batteries: they totally can’t stand overheating. - Carry the phone in an inner pocket of your coat or an outer pocket but encased in a protective covering. Low temperatures are harmful to the battery because it needs more power to keep itself warm enough to function. - Try to lower the brightness of your screen at least by 30-40%. - At the approach of a thunderstorm, never charge your phone. Actually, the same goes for all the electrical appliances you have. - To wipe the screen, use lint-free wipers and whatever you do, never use window cleaning liquids. They contain ammonia which can damage the screen irrevocably. - If you drop your cell phone into a pool or a sink, the first thing you should do after you get it out is turn it off and remove the battery (if it’s possible, of course). - Don’t put your cell phone on the dashboard when driving. Constant moving and bumping can cause a lot of damage. - Read user reviews before you hit the update button. The problem with such updates is that it’s either very hard or impossible to go back to the previous version of the software. - Even if you have a lot of free space on your hard drive, it’s better to use cloud storage anyway. This way your phone won’t be clogged with too much data so that it will perform much better. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 4209555 BRIGHT SIDE
Annotating Text
 
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Views: 236198 Katie Cranfill
30 THINGS YOU KEEP DOING WRONG
 
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Change your perspective on the common things you used to do wrong! You'll thank me later! 😉 Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY: https://goo.gl/fWbJqz Subscribe to 5-Minute Workouts: https://goo.gl/67owiQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: 5-Minute Crafts KIDS: https://goo.gl/PEuLVt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 24071398 5-Minute Crafts
Basic English Grammar - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ What is a noun? What is a verb? What is an adjective? AHHHHH!!! Learn how to recognize nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in this important basic grammar lesson. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/basics-noun-verb-adjective-adverb/
Writing SEO Articles
 
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Subscribe to GrowthLab: https://www.youtube.com/c/GrowthLab?sub_confirmation=1 Skills 101 is a new GrowthLab series to help entrepreneurs get started from scratch. Whether you need to set up a Facebook page for your business or learn the proper way to set up AdSense for your business, we have you covered. In this episode of the GrowthLab series, Skills 101, host Chris Neal breaks down SEO for people who have no idea what SEO even means. This episode focuses on SEO articles, specifically writing SEO friendly articles. About GrowthLab: GrowthLab was founded by New York Times best-selling author Ramit Sethi. Subscribe to GrowthLab: https://www.youtube.com/c/GrowthLab?sub_confirmation=1 Visit GrowthLab at http://GrowthLab.com for weekly insights on how to start and grow your online business. Follow GrowthLab: Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisisgrowthlab Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisisgrowthlab/
Views: 315 GrowthLab
How to write a basic paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ A writing lesson for absolute beginners! Here are four very basic rules you must follow when writing simple paragraphs. Learn the basics -- capitals, indentation, line spacing, and more. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-basic-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. Do you know how to write a basic paragraph? This is not only for ESL students. This is for everyone around the world, even if you speak English, even if you don't speak English. This is a very, very beautiful, basic lesson on how to write small, short, beautiful paragraphs. "How to Write a Basic Paragraph". Now, I also want you to be very careful. This is not how to write a 200-word essay for your university exam. We don't have enough time in the world for me to teach you that, and I probably forget. So this is, very simply, how to write a basic English paragraph. One, two, three, four rules. Rule No. 1 is: Indent, indent. What does "indent" mean? Indent, basically, means -- I learned this when I was a child -- you take your finger. You can have a big finger, a small finger -- I don't care. You take your finger or two fingers, and you make a little space like so. This is called an "indentation" or "indent". So "indent" means you leave a space at the very first line of the paragraph. And that's it. You do not leave a space at any other lines in the paragraph, only the first line. So it's very important that you only indent the first line of your paragraph like so. Okay. The next thing that you have to do is you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every sentence. Now, the word that I've written is "I". Another rule in English is that every single time you write "I", it must be a capital. So I'm going to write an example sentence for you to illustrate what I mean: "I am a teacher." Okay? This is one sentence. So rule No. 3: At the end of my sentence, I must use a period. A "period" is a dot, if you'd like. So "I am a teacher." So what I'm going to do is my next sentence... I'm going to begin it with a capital letter. "My" -- so I want to say, "My name -- My name is Ronnie." So what I've done: Rule No. 1, indent. Rule No. 2, you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every new sentence. Rule No. 3, you're going to use a period at the end of each sentence so that the person reading your beautiful paragraph knows when to stop and take a break. For example, if I did not have a period here, I'd say, "I'm a teacher my name is Ronnie." You need to break up your ideas. So one sentence has one thought and one period. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie." Next one. No. 4. I see this in a lot of students' writing. The two basic things about a paragraph are the form and the content. The form is the most important. The form is the indentation. And don't use point form. Do you know what "point form" is? If you're typing something on Word or on an email, "point form" is also called "bullets", which [makes shooting sounds]. So "bullet" means you would put each new sentence on a new line. So if I was to write this: "I'm a teacher", then I would put my next sentence here. This is not how to make a paragraph. This is "point form". So this is a bad paragraph. What I'm going to do is I'm going to write until I almost reach the end of the page. Don't write past the end of the page because then you're writing on the desk and it gets messy. So "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live -- so I'm going to use up all of my line until the end -- I live in Canada." What would you like to know about Canada? "Canada is very cold." In the winter. So as you can see by my example, I only stop my sentence at the end of my paper. I don't use each sentence on each line. So four basic things to remember when you're writing a basic English paragraph. The first one is: Indent the first line of your paragraph only. Use a capital letter at the beginning of each new line or each new sentence. And use a period at the end. Also, don't forget: Don't use point form. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live in Canada. Canada is very cold. Go to 'Subscribe' on YouTube so you can find more great lessons like this." Goodbye.
43 MISTAKES YOU HAVE TO STOP MAKING
 
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How to correct your mistakes and behave better! All of us make mistakes when it comes to eating or behaving in certain ways. Sometimes we do it out of habit or because we believe that's the correct way to do it and other times because we might be inconsiderate without realizing it. So, in this video, we have a list of things that you are doing wrong and how to correct them. In addition, we also share with you some tips to help you rock the Savoir Vivre and understand good manners. - Eating the ice-cubes after you finished a drink - You should finish your drink and let the ice-cubes sit at the bottom instead of trying to get every last drop of it. - Not removing your tea bag from your tea. - Let you teabag brew for a couple of minutes (tea bags always have instruction on how long each tea needs to brew), then remove the tea bag and place it on the side of your plate. - Eating your spaghetti with just a fork. - You should always use both a fork and a spoon when eating spaghetti to make sure all of it goes on to the fork and prevent any of the falling out, or on your shirt. - Filling your wine glass. - When it comes to drinking wine, you should always fill the glass right below the middle to allow room for the wine to breath inside the glass. - Crossing your legs - When it comes to going to interview crossing your legs can be interpreted into being closed and not wanting to communicate. In addition, it is not considered very kind by many people. So if you want to cross them for comfort, just cross your feet. - Having your phone on the table. - Whether this is a job interview or a coffee with friends or family, you should always keep your phone tucked away in your bag. It is considered rude to have your phone out as it might make people think that you'd rather not talk to them be destructed with your phone. - Bitting a slice of bread. - It is more kind and an indication of good manners to cut a slice off your bread and then bite it. - Re-touching your makeup on the table or in public. - It is more polite to re-touch your makeup in the bathroom instead of public places, not everyone will like that at the table. - Not wiping your lips before drinking. - We've seen this everyone and it's not the best look to see lipstick stains on wine glasses. In order to avoid that simply wipe your lipstick using a paper towel and then drink. Watch our whole video to discover many more amazing hacks on how to correct things you are doing wrong. We demonstrate many more ways to behave at the table as well as things that you should stop doing all together which can spoil your time with your friends. For example, taking a million pictures of your food before eating or talking on the phone when you are with others and many more. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Timestamps: 0:15 - Drinking tea 0:27 - How to eat spaghetti 0:49 - Crossing your legs 1:24 - Don't do this with your makeup 2:11 - How to drink champagne 3:43 - Toilet phone 4:19 - Food pictures 5:01 - How not to take photos 6:58 - Tangled earphones 7:47 - How to chop an onion without crying ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Music by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5Minute.Crafts.Girly/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/5m_crafts Subscribe to 5-Minute MAGIC: http://bit.ly/2ldditZ 5-Minute Crafts KIDS: https://goo.gl/PEuLVt The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/ Music by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/
Views: 2458880 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
Active and Passive Voice Trick | Active Voice and Passive Voice in English Grammar | DSSSB, RRB D
 
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Active and Passive Voice | Active Voice and Passive Voice in English Grammar | Active and Passive Voice Rules Hi, After lots of research and work on #ActiveVoice and #PassiveVoice, finally we have created a trick by using that you can answer any question within 2 seconds. This trick is accurate and you won't believe how much easy it is. Now you don't have to worry about English section because Dear Sir understand's their responsibility and they won't let you down. Watch this video till end and you will be a master in Active and Passive voice. - DON'T FORGET TO SHARE- Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXZtRXpGNck&t=554s Best Preposition Trick Ever :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsiroffi... ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/1126392149936... -SUPPORT US- Donate for good purpose :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir/join Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir” active voice and passive voice in english grammar active voice se passive voice banane ke niyam एक्टिव वॉइस से पेसिव वॉइस बनाना active and passive voice rules active voice passive voice active and passive voice active and passive voice continuous tense active and passive voice in hindi active voice meaning in telugu, active voice meaning in kannada, active voice meaning in malayalam, active voice meaning in bengali, active voice meaning in gujarati, active voice meaning in urdu, passive n active voice, active n passive voice in hindi, active voice of simple present tense, active/passive voice of verbs, active passive voice of imperative sentence, definition of active voice, active and passive voice in odia, only active voice, active passive voice of interrogative sentences, examples of active voice, active voice passive voice, active voice passive voice in tamil, active voice passive voice in hindi, active voice passive voice in telugu, active voice passive voice in english, active voice passive voice examples, active voice passive voice banana, active voice questions, active voice questions and answers, active voice question form, active and passive voice questions, active and passive voice wh-questions, active and passive voice quiz, active voice rules, active voice rules chart, active voice rules and examples, active voice rwanda, active voice rather than passive voice, passive active voice rules, active passive voice by ram sir, active and passive voice rakesh yadav, radioactive the voice, active voice song, active voice structure, active voice simple present, active voice se passive voice banane ke niyam, active voice simple present tense sentences, active voice simple present tense, active voice search, active voice sentence in english, active voice compared to passive voice, active and passive voice class 10, active voice definition, active voice dsl, active voice definition in hindi, active voice and passive voice, active voice and passive voice in hindi, active voice and passive voice in english, active voice and passive voice by awal, active voice and passive voice by dear sir, difference between active voice and passive voice in hindi, active voice and passive voice by anil chugh, active voice and passive voice questions, active voice and passive voice question and answer, active voice and passive rules, active voice and passive voice song, active voice and passive voice sentences, active voice and passive voice in sinhala, active voice and passive voice simple present tense, active voice and passive voice structures, active voice and passive voice short trick, tense active voice and passive voice, active voice and passive voice tricks, active voice and passive voice tutorial, active voice and passive voice through tamil, active voice and passive voice in urdu, what is active voice and passive voice, what is active voice and passive voice in tamil, what is active voice and passive voice in telugu, what is active voice and passive voice in urdu, active voice and passive voice with examples, 10th active voice and passive voice
Views: 2157088 Dear Sir
How to develop your Communication Skills by International Keynote Speaker Simerjeet Singh | CC 8
 
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How to develop your Communication Skills | International Keynote Speaker Simerjeet Singh on how to improve your communication skills | Law Of Paying The Price | Coach On Campus 8 | Tips For Effective Communication Skills International motivational speaker, Simerjeet Singh, brings out to us a very important aspect without which our life will become numb. COMMUNICATION is an art to express our feelings and emotions to others, but a successful person is a one who is able to communicate well. Simerjeet renders tips for effective communication skills by illustrating the LAW OF PAYING THE PRICE, where he emphasizes to put in the best efforts to receive the desired outcome. As the old saying goes, Communication Works For Those, Those Who Work At It! Continue to put in same efforts, the outcome too will continue to be the same. Therefore, change in efforts to change the outcome. Simerjeet also clarifies the misconception between developing effective communication skills and effective English speaking. For more information, please visit his website: http://www.simerjeetsingh.com Follow us on: Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/cuttingedgeINDIA Blog: http://www.simerjeet.wordpress.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cuttingedgeindia/ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/CuttingEdgeINDIA
Views: 4395602 Simerjeet Singh
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. Contents: 1. How to Build a Simple Sentence 0:32 2. Complements - What Comes Next? 2:58 3. Adding Description to Your Sentences 8:43 4. How to Make Complex Sentences with Independent Clauses 11:41 5. How to Make Complex Sentences with Dependent Clauses 15:36 To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 609126 Oxford Online English
Boost Metabolism: Steamroom vs. Sauna - Which is Better? - Thomas DeLauer
 
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Boost Metabolism: Sauna vs. Steam Room- Which is better? Find out how to elevate your mood, boost your metabolism, detoxify your body and reduce muscle stiffness. Learn this and more at http://www.ThomasDeLauer.com You may have heard discussion around the benefits of the sauna and the steam room, but is one better for you than another? There is only so much time in the day to spend at the gym, so we want to be sure to get the most out of what we do in the least amount of time. Saunas have been around for thousands of years. Finland has a sauna tradition that has been around for two thousand years strong, and many attribute their endurance and longevity to the time they spend in the sauna. Saunas and steam rooms are touted to induce mental and physical relaxation, and both induce large amounts of sweating, which has health benefits such as releasing toxins from the body. So where does the difference lie? Saunas are dry heat whereas steam rooms are at 100% humidity. One of the biggest differences has to do with temperature - when a room is humid we feel as though it is hotter than it actually is. Due to this, saunas are able to be kept at a much higher temperature than steam rooms. Saunas range from 160 to 200 degrees Fahrenheit, wheres steam rooms are at 110 to 120. In order to understand how these differences would lead to the best option of the two, we must first understand the benefits of both saunas and steam rooms. Benefit 1: Increased blood flow Blood vessels enlarge when your body temperature rises, allowing increased delivery of oxygen and nutrients throughout your body. After particularly vigorous exercise, try to get 15-30 minutes in the sauna or steam room to reap the benefits of this increased nutrient and oxygen delivery to your muscles. The increased blood flow allows an acceleration of tissue repair post workout. The faster you heal the better you feel and more able you are to take your next workout to a higher level. Benefit 2: Increased metabolism and physical endurance Increase the temperature and you will increase your metabolism, which is simply how quickly your body burns calories, due to this heat. Your body works harder to try and keep itself cool, thereby burning calories at a higher rate. Benefit 3: Inflammation Exposure to the high heat results in a release of noradrenaline, adrenaline and cortisol, which all have anti-inflammatory properties. This can help in mobility and pain, temporarily relieving stiffness post workout. Many people suffering with arthritis have reported relief after spending time in the sauna or steam room. Benefit 4: Sweating Sweating helps to lower blood pressure by secreting salts, detoxify by expelling toxins through our pores and helps to increase caloric expenditure. Benefit 5: Mood We are all familiar with the pleasant mood that you feel after going to the sauna or steam room. People report feeling less anxiety, increased relaxation, improved general mood and even increased alertness after trips to the sauna and steamroom. Why does this happen? 1. Livestrong.com: Sauna vs. Steam Room http://www.livestrong.com/article/153808-sauna-vs-steam-room/ 2. Livestrong.com: Benefits of Using a Steam Room After Workout http://www.livestrong.com/article/19467-benefits-using-steam-room-after/ 3. coon, G. S., Hopkins, W. G., Mayhew, S. & Cotter, J. D. Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. Journal of science and medicine in sport / Sports Medicine Australia 10, 259-262, doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2006.06.009 (2007). http://fourhourworkweek.com/2014/04/10/saunas-hyperthermic-conditioning-2/ 4. Finnleo - Pure Sauna: Sauna and Arthritis http://www.finnleo.com/blog.aspx?r_id=38850 5. Fitday.com: 3 benefits of sweating http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/fitness/cardio/3-benefits-of-sweating.html 6. New Scientist: Saunas Could Heal Your Mood and Your Heart https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21206-saunas-could-heal-your-mood-and-your-heart/ 7. Effects of Waon therapy on chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25748743 8. Go Ask Alice: Benefits of Sauna i. Subscribe to the Thomas DeLauer Channel Here: http://www.youtube.com/user/thetdelauer?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 340347 Thomas DeLauer
25 TRICKS TO CUT FRUITS THE RIGHT WAY
 
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HOW TO CUT FRUITS CORRECTLY Summer season is the ultimate time to fill up your organism with vitamines and other useful substances. But first let's find out how to cut the fruits quickly and correctly. If you forgot a knife for your picnic and don't know how to cut a watermelon, don't worry. Just take a thread or even better - a dental floss and cut the pulp from the down side first and later divide it into several equal slices as many as you need in a vertical movements. Great way to debone cherries especially if you will feed them to an infant is following. Take a glass bottle with a narrow neck, put a cherry on top one by one and then press on it with a wooden stick. Chopsticks will work just as good. Simply genius and incredibly easy way to peel off kiwis – cut a kiwi in half, take a mixer whisk, insert it right in the kiwi and turn around. You’ll get 4 neat slices without any traces of kiwi peel, which is notorious for the tongue irritation. Here’s how to cut a pomegranate in the best way possible. Cut out an upper part of the pomegranate’s skin in a circle or a pentagon. Take it out and then you’ll see the lines where you need to cut in order to take off the seeds properly. Timestamps: 2:47 Giant carrot sharpener 6:32 How to peel off garlic 9:03 Citrus peel off ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/5m_crafts Subscribe to 5-Minute MAGIC: http://bit.ly/2ldditZ Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY: https://goo.gl/fWbJqz Subscribe 5-Minute Crafts KIDS: https://goo.gl/PEuLVt The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 16334424 5-Minute Crafts
Articles and Contractions | Lesson 2 | English Course
 
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Learn Articles And Contractions In English In this class you will learn how to use in a correct way Articles And Contractions in a short and useful class. ▶ Learn English from scratch with English2Me, I am Teacher Diego and welcome to English2Me. The best way to learn English with short and useful classes. ▶ If you want to learn English do not forget to be Subscribed to this channel and activate de Notifications where you will have New Classes Every Week! ▶ If you liked the class you will help me a lot giving me your Like and Commenting the video. Thanks for the support! If you want to know more about English2Me you can visit our Web Page where you will have Material and Study Books designed for you! Web Page: https://english2mee.wordpress.com/   You can visit our Social Networks where we share English Tips that will help you a lot! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/english2mee/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/english2mee/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/english2me Remember to Subscribe for more classes, Drop your Like if you liked the class, Share it to increase and you will help me a lot if you Comment about what do you think about the class, Thanks for your attention and have an excellent day! If you want to take the class full explained in Spanish here you have! https://youtu.be/wWAu_KLQTRQ
APA Style 6th Ed.: In-Text Citations, Quotations, and Plagiarism
 
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This video will show you how to set up your paper following correct APA Style guidelines in Microsoft Word 2010 for PC. This specific video focuses on using parenthetical and in-text citations, quotations, and how to properly credit authors to avoid plagiarism. The steps should be very similar on every version of Word since 2007 for PC. On Word for Mac, I believe the steps are the same, but the interface is different. For how to make a Title Page and Running Head: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKWKswH29kM For how to make a Reference List: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Yv--VVS9Zw For more information about APA Style, pick up the latest version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, or browse through the resources at the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/
Views: 375181 Samuel Forlenza
50 Words You're Pronouncing WRONGLY Right Now! | Top 50 Mispronounced English Words, Common Mistakes
 
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Learn the TOP 50 MISPRONOUNCED English words. These words are common mistakes made by many English learners. I will show you how to avoid these incorrect pronunciations and say all of these words correctly in this pronunciation lesson. For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I will show you fifty words that you are probably pronouncing incorrectly right now. And I’ll also teach you how to say them correctly. Let’s start with this word – how do you say it? Well, we say /prə-’nauns/, /prə-’naunst/ and /prə-’nauns-iŋ/, but /prə-nən- si-’eɪ-shən/. There’s no ‘noun’ in this word. It’s ‘pronunciation.’ Word number two is ‘says’. This word is commonly mispronounced by people learning English as /s eɪs/. But remember: I say, you say, but he or she /sez/. Number three is ‘et cetera’. A very common incorrect pronunciation is to say ‘ek’ – ‘ek setra’ instead of ‘et’. Don’t say that. And also remember that the stress is on ‘ce’. So the word is /et-’se- tə-rə/. You will also hear /et-’se-trə/ – that is less common but it’s OK too. Next up is ‘often’. Some pronounce this as /’äf-tən/. Now, strictly speaking, /’äf- tən/ is not wrong, but the more common pronunciation is with the ‘t’ silent, so I recommend that you always say /’ä-fən/. One word that is often mispronounced by learners of English is ‘women’. This is, of course, because of the English language’s crazy spelling system. But remember that we say /’wu-mən/ for one woman and /’wi-min/ for the plural – /’wi-min/. Word number six is ‘police’. This isn’t /po-lees/ or /po- lis/. It’s /pə/ and /lees/ with the stress on /lees/. So /pə-’lees/. The next word is ‘vehicle’. It’s often pronounced wrongly as /ve-hi-kl/. But the ‘e’ is a long vowel and the ‘h’ is silent. So /’vee-ə-kl/. Number eight is this word. How would you say it? The correct pronunciation is /’zhän-rə/. Pay attention to the first sound, it’s like ‘sh’ but you put your voice into it - /’zhän-rə/. /’zhän-rə/ Next up is actually what you’re watching right now – ‘video’. The important thing is that both the ‘i’ and the ‘e’ are pronounced as short ‘i’ sounds. It’s not /vee-di-o/, it’s /’vi-di-o/. If you watch a video on YouTube or Facebook, you might leave a ‘comment’. I have heard many speakers say /’kə-ment/. Now whether you use this word as a noun or a verb, the first syllable is always /’kä /. So it’s never a /’kə-ment/, it’s a /’kä-ment/. Word number eleven is ‘interesting’. This is mispronounced sometimes as /’in-tə-rə-stiŋ/. But there are only three syllables – /in / – /trə / – /stiŋ/ and the stress is on ‘IN’. So the word is /’in-trə-stiŋ/. Number twelve is ‘hotel’. There are two syllables – /ho/ and / tel/ like the English word ‘tell’ as in ‘tell me’. The stress is on the second syllable, so /ho-’tel/. A related word is ‘suite’. This means a set of connected rooms in a hotel and this is wrongly pronounced by many people as /soot/. But it’s /sweet/ - like when you eat a piece of candy - /sweet/. While we’re on the topic of suites and hotels, I cannot leave out this word – ‘restaurant’. It gives a lot of English learners trouble. But, don’t let the fancy spelling confuse you – the second syllable is just /tə /. The third is /ränt/. So /’res-tə- ränt/. In British English, you might hear just two syllables – /’res-trɒnt/ - that is also correct. After you eat at a restaurant, you have to pay the bill. But you might get a discount on your bill if you have one of these – a ‘coupon’. A common incorrect pronunciation is /’koo-pən/. But the second syllable should be /pän/. So – /’koo-pän/. Here’s word number sixteen – how would you say it? The proper pronunciation is not ‘break’ ‘fast’ – it’s ‘breakfast’. /brek / with a short /e/ sound and /fəst/ with an /ə/ sound - so /’brek-fəst/. You know what I had for breakfast today? I had this – ‘pizza’. Really, I did. It’s not a /pee-sə/ and it’s not a /peed-zə/. There’s no /z/ sound in this word. It’s /peet/, /sə/ - /’peet-sə/. Another food word that’s mispronounced a lot is ‘vegetable’. It’s not /ve-jə- tə-bl/. If you say it correctly, there are only three syllables - /vej/, / tə/, /bl/ - /’vej- tə-bl/. Let’s talk about a couple of vegetables now – this is a ‘cucumber’. It’s not a /ku- koom-bər/. Think of it like saying the letter ‘Q’ and then /kəm-bər/ like ‘number’. So /’kyoo-kəm-bər/. This vegetable is called ‘lettuce’. I know the spelling looks like /let-yoos/ but it’s not – it’s /letis/. And since we talking about food, here’s a food that just about everybody loves – ‘chocolate’. When you ask for this at the store, make sure there are only two syllables – /chäk / and /lət/ - /’chäk-lət/. And remember: there is no ‘late’ in ‘chocolate’. Speaking of chocolate, how would you say this word? This is ‘dessert’.
Views: 4671960 Learn English Lab
Correct way to use do and does || Deeksha || English grammar lessons for beginners
 
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In this video you will learn how to use do and does in our daily life.
Views: 218 English rocks
How To Write Blog Posts Faster | Speed Blogging Tutorial
 
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http://workwithaceandrich.com/click/YTBYL How To Write Blog Posts Faster | Speed Blogging Tutorial Are you frustrated with how long it takes you to write your blog posts? Well, what if I told you that I can show you how to write faster and get a blog post written on any topic under 30 minutes? In this video tutorial, Anastacia Hauldridge "Ace" is going to share with you how to write blog posts faster with her speed blogging strategy that will help you write content faster. Tips for how to be a better blogger: 1. Make sure to do your keyword research first before producing any type of content. 2. Open 4 separate notepad documents and label them as 1. Introduction. 2. Content/Body 3. Conclusion/Final Thoughts and 4. Call To Action 3. Copy and paste all information from TXT to your WordPress TEXT area. 4. Proofread everything and use Grammarly to correct your spelling and grammar. Resources: Use Notepad on your PC or Text for MAC Eat That Frog by Brian Tracy http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B... Grammarly https://app.grammarly.com/ GCF Learn Free (Learn essential basic skills such as typing tutor, how to use a computer, internet 101 and over 125 tutorials more) http://www.gcflearnfree.org/ Click the subscribe button so you won’t miss out on any of our valuable marketing tips that we offer for free here on this channel and if you liked this video gives us a thumbs up. If you learned something new from this video please leave a comment below about what was your biggest takeaway.
Views: 5093 Freedom By Design
Transportation Vocabulary & Phrasal Verbs - GET ON, GET OUT OF, RIDE, GO
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ I GET OFF a train, bus, or subway. But: I GET OUT OF a car or taxi. I RIDE a bike and a motorcycle. How do you get to work or school? Learn how to use phrasal verbs to talk about transportation, then test yourself on the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/transportation-vocabulary-phrasal-verbs/ Hello. How are you? Today, we're going to learn about getting around. This means taking public transportation or talking about how you got somewhere or how you're going to go somewhere. All of the examples I've written in the past tense because somebody might ask you, "How did you get here?" "What? I flew because I have a magic carpet. That's how. Why?" We have different ways of getting places. Verbs: You can say, "I took a 'bus', a 'train', a 'cab', or a 'taxi'." "Cab" and "taxi" are the same. Or you can take a "plane". So with all of these nouns -- "plane", "cab", "taxi", "train", "bus" -- you're going to use the verb "took". There are no exceptions. You cannot say, "I rode a bus. I rode a train." It's wrong. "Rode" means that you were on top of the bus or on the train doing some bus surfing -- didn't happen. I hear people say this a lot, "How did you get here?" "I ride car." "Wow. What were you doing on top of the car?" If you "ride" something, you're always on top of it. What can you -- what can you ride? I can ride a bicycle. So "ride" literally means you're on top of something. Tell me what you can ride. You can ride a bicycle, a motorcycle, a scooter, a moped. If you're on top of it, you're riding it -- a horse. "I go by car." No, no, no. These, unfortunately, are wrong. We don't say, "I go by car" or "I ride car." We say, very easily, past tense of the verb "drive": "drove". "How did you get here?" "I drove." You do not need to say, "I drove by car" because you're not driving a bus; you're not driving an airplane; you're not driving a train. Very simply, you can say, "I drove." Another thing that I hear people say is, "I go by foot." "One foot? You have one foot? Did you hop here the whole time? You must be tired. You go by foot? Wow." Maybe you only have one foot. That's cool. You should drive or take a bus. Another thing: "I walk on foot." This means that you take your hands, and you literally put them underneath your feet and you walk -- if this is your foot -- you walk on your hands. This is painful. I do not recommend this. I would not literally want to walk on my hands. Please don't walk on your feet. Do not walk on your hands. "I walk on your foot" would be, "I'm sorry" -- walk on hands, walk on feet. You'd be stepping on your feet, and you would never get anywhere. You just want to say, "I walked." "How did you get here today, Ronnie?" "I walked." Another thing that's really confusing in English -- and I understand why -- is when to use the phrasal verb "got on" or "got off", and when to say "got in" or "got out". So as an example, we would say, "I got off the train." Let's write that down. Or you can say, "I got on the train." Also, we use this with a bus. So you can say, "I got on the bus" and "I got off the bus." You don't need to use extra words. Like, you don't want to say, "I got off on the bus." You don't want to say, "I got the train off." Unnecessary. Please do not use extra words when you say this. You're just going to say, "I got on" -- the verb -- the noun. Or "I got off", the noun. "Train", "bus", and the "plane", or an "airplane". So think about this: What does -- or what do trains, buses, and airplanes have in common? No? Nothing? No? Okay. A train, a bus, or an airplane has many people. You can think of it as something that is public or very large. So a train, a bus, or an airplane, you have to pay. It's really big, and you can fit many people on it. So you're going to get on or get off something that is very big. You're going to get off something that's very big. Or if it's public transportation, you can fit many people.
How to write a good essay
 
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How to write an essay- brief essays and use the principles to expand to longer essays/ even a thesis you might also wish to check the video on Interview technique (now on this channel too!)
Views: 3145717 zontulfilmsltd
How to Use Twitter
 
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Watch this video to learn how to use all of the features of Twitter, including how to create a tweet, how to add pictures or videos to your tweets, how to retweet someone else’s post, how to check your notifications, and more. To create a tweet, click in the box labelled “what’s happening?” Type in what you’d like to say. To mention one of your friends, type the @ symbol, followed by their username. If you’d like to add an emoji to your tweet, click the smiley in the bottom right corner of the box. When you’re ready to post, click Tweet. To share a tweet with a photo or video attached, click the text box at the top of your screen to compose a new tweet. Click the photo icon to attach a photo or video. Locate the file on your computer, then click Open. Type in the text box if you’d like to add a caption. When you’re done, click Tweet. You can also share GIFs in your tweets. To add one, click the GIF icon when creating a new tweet, then search for the type of GIF you want to find. When you see one you like, click on it to attach it to your tweet. To run a poll on Twitter, begin composing a new tweet. Then click the chart icon to add a poll. In the top text box, add a question. Then, add however many choices you’d like to have in the poll. Choose how long you’d like the poll to last. Your friends will be able to vote, and you’ll be able to see the results. To see your Twitter notifications, click Notifications at the top of your screen. Here, you’ll be able to see when you get a new follower, when someone likes one of your tweets, or if someone retweets one of your posts. You’ll also get a notification if someone else mentions you in one of their tweets. To find new accounts to follow, look at the “who to follow” section on the right. Click the follow button beside a suggested Twitter profile if you’d like to follow them. Click View all to see more suggestions. Scroll through and click Follow beside any accounts you’re interested in. To find someone on Twitter, click the search bar at the top of your screen and type in the name or username of the person you’re looking for, then click the magnifying glass icon. When you see the person’s profile appear in the search results, click the Follow button, or click on their name to open their profile. the main twitter homepage, you’ll see posts from others. Scroll down to see older posts. If you see a post you like, click the heart button to “like” it. If you want to share that post with your own followers, click the arrow button. If you’d like to add a comment, click in the text box above and type in what you’d like to add. Then click Retweet. To reply to someone else’s tweet, click the speech bubble icon that appears below it. A new window will open, allowing you to enter your reply. Type in what you’d like to say. Add any attachments if you’d like. When you’re done composing your tweet, click Reply. To see what’s popular on Twitter, check out the Trends panel on the left side. You’ll see a list of popular topics and hashtags. If you want, you can see trending topics for a certain area. To do so, click Change. Then click Change again. Type in the location you’d like to see trends for. Finally, click Done. To see news stories or get caught up on current events on Twitter, click Moments at the top of your screen. You can view top stories from the current day, or select a more specific topic, like News, Sports, Entertainment, or Fun. Click on a story to read more about it. To send a message on Twitter, click Messages at the top of your screen. A window will open showing your conversations. To start a new one, click New Message. Type in the username of the person you’d like to chat with. Click Next. Click in the text box, and type in your message. Add any attachments you want to include. Click Send to send your message off. To sign out of Twitter, click on your profile picture in the top right corner of your browser window. Then, click Log Out from the menu that appears below. Check out our playlist of Twitter videos to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLk3xjyeTggSbkZ1h7UPw3-hfWWmR0CyXi If you prefer to learn by reading, head over to our free Twitter course: https://techboomers.com/p/twitter Visit http://www.techboomers.com for over 100 free courses on all of today's most popular websites & apps!
Views: 192399 Techboomers
How To Write An Effective SEO Friendly Article [HD]
 
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http://www.learn-search-engine-optimization.com/?p=179 Check out my SEO blog for more informative content. Top rated Article directories: 1. http://ezinearticles.com/ 2. http://goarticles.com/ 3. . http://wrytestuff.com/ 4. http://www.articlesbase.com/ Visit today for more free SEO expert advice: http://www.learn-search-engine-optimization.com/?p=179
Views: 7367 LearnSEOBlogTips
Mick’s Vlog – Blue Strat Gets A Callaham Bridge – That Pedal Show
 
51:25
Welcome to That Pedal Show! Please subscribe to our channel and visit our store https://www.thatpedalshowstore.com Life too short for long YouTube videos? Please see the ‘Interesting bits and go-to sections’ information below. In this video I pick up from Part 1 where I decided that I’d subject my favourite electric guitar to a couple of major changes. Blue’s American Vintage Syncronized Tremolo unit gets swapped out for a Callaham Vintage S Model Strat Bridge Assembly – this one: http://www.callahamguitars.com/strat_bridge_vintage_catalog.htm Can I hear much difference? Well, a little bit perhaps. Can I feel the difference? Oh yes! I put new strings on the guitar, play some phrases… then swap the bridge and document that process, with a few tips on setting action and intonation along the way. Then keeping the exact same settings on the pedals and amp, I go back in with the new bridge and play the same passages again so it can edit into an A/B comparison. That was all done 23 December 2018. After three weeks of playing, filming TPS shows and one gig, I reflect on the bridge change experience. NOTE ON THE ‘CORRECT’ WAY TO SET STRAT BRIDGES Okay, so I don’t have my Strat bridge floating… which is the traditional, ‘correct’ way that many people like, and indeed how they come out of the factory. I don’t like that because the guitar detunes when you bend strings, and tuning/bridge stability in general is less reliable for the way I play. The way I like mine is set flat on the body and poised so it will down-bend relatively easily… but not so easily that string bending will make the other strings go flat. Hope that makes sense. Fender has a good guide to setting up a Syncronized Tremolo in the ‘correct’ manner on its website, here: https://support.fender.com/hc/en-us/articles/212774786-How-do-I-set-up-my-Stratocaster-guitar-properly- Interesting bits and go to sections… - Intro: 0:00 - The bridge change happens: 2:17 - Comparing the old and new bridge before it goes in: 9:40 - New one goes in: 11:23 - Springs? 15:30 - Action and intonation prep: 18:00 - Intonation adjustment: 19:40 - Mick's action measurements: 25:10 - Arm tension? 25:35 - The sound comparison: 28:42 - Post-playing thoughts and observations: 39:40 Enjoy the video! Pedals and amps used in this video… • Keeley D&M Drive UK & Europe: http://bit.ly/2oTblU1 USA:http://bit.ly/2rfACMd Australia: http://bit.ly/2pUDUAE • Chase Bliss Tonal Recall UK & Europe: http://bit.ly/2wonMwL USA: http://bit.ly/2wuEBWL Australia: http://bit.ly/2oln0MC • Supro Tremolo UK & Europe: http://bit.ly/2pZrAkZ • TheGigRig QMX6 https://www.thegigrig.com/quartermaster Two-Rock Classic Reverb Signature with Two-Rock 212 cab and TR 1265B speakers Guitars in this episode: • Fender American Vintage ’62 Stratocaster (2001): Watch Mick’s video at http://bit.ly/2cQv3yT We hope you enjoy this video. Please subscribe to our channel. You may even want to buy a T-shirt to support our efforts https://www.thatpedalshowstore.com We are also on Patreon – crowdfunding for creatives https://www.patreon.com/ThatPedalShow Please visit our preferred retailers! UK & Europe: Andertons Music http://bit.ly/2cRvIvt USA: Riff City Guitar & Music Company http://bit.ly/2cyOYjD Australia: Pedal Empire http://bit.ly/2mWmJQf
Views: 55830 That Pedal Show
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
09:26
Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 303940 David Taylor

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