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When to Use "THE" Article in English Language Grammar
 
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Start improving your fluency now with the English Fluency Formula audio ebook FREE sample: http://bit.ly/effebook --~-- Learn more at: http://gonaturalenglish.com Join the free sample course the 7 Steps to Fluency athttp://gonaturalenglish.com/7steps. Gabby answers another question in this video lesson. When do you use articles? Many of you might think that articles in English are difficult, but Gabby is going to make it really simple for you in this video. ‘The’ is called a Definite Article because we are talking about something specific. We’re talking about something that we can clearly define. There are certain words that you will not put after ‘The’. For example: ‘All you need is love’. For this expression you don’t need to add ‘The’ because it is referring to love in general. However, when you say, ‘The love of a mother’ ‘The’ is necessary because this is a statement about a specific kind of love. ‘The’ is necessary to portray the idea clearly. ‘The’ is used when you talk about objects, specific locations, certain countries and even one singular thing such as; The cat. The door. The car. The moon. Practice using ‘The’ and practice listening for it in sentences. You’ll notice that when someone forgets to say ‘The’, it may cause some confusion or disrupt the flow of a sentence. Want to learn more? Take advantage of the online English video classes from Gabby available at www.GoNaturalEnglish.com. Visit now to find out about limited enrollment periods and special offers. Join people with your same goals in our online community of English learners at www.Facebook.com/GoNaturalEnglish and on Twitter atwww.twitter.com/GoNaturalEng
Articles A, An and The | Easy Way to Learn Articles A, an and The | Simple Tricks.Part 48.
 
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#useofarticleinenglish#useofaantheinenglishgrammar Faceboo page link https://www.facebook.com/Taukir-Alam-Life-Changing-Videos-In-Hindi-1946083169039804/ Join & support me https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCN2nVLRL3h9uRGzkx5a2XQ/join Be ( is, am, are, was, were, shall, will) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA119P5kcfwaxn6sT_OOpxZ8wm PRONUNCIATION &"SILENT LETTERS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA119sDRYmUWITsbsjGjtOiU0Q A, AN & THE https://youtu.be/OACqq2uieuY All Tenses https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_rbjxG9qk7BACT-MOy88Qr PREPOSITIONS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_f5mrjVRVwy2_4fcl-Njiw ACTIVE VOICE/ PASSIVE VOICE https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_ZwnZaQ8_-Jv2BVjR7mLDG CONJUNCTIONS https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA118bdrxxLWwQBDLsVKiRis9M VOCABULARY https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJWaq0bkA11_BuXAwqQiTOjq3SREjqUc6 #articlesaandan#useoftheinenglish
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 415303 Learn English Lab
How to use Google Scholar to find journal articles | Essay Tips
 
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My second essay tips video. Conducting a comprehensive literature review is an important part of any research project. Here are my tips for how to use Google Scholar effectively to quickly and easily find the academic papers, journal articles or books you need to write that essay or complete that dissertation. This is the second in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. If you've enjoyed this video then please do check out the rest of my channel. I generally put out new videos every Tuesday and Friday discussing theatre and playwriting from the perspective of an aspirant and (some might say) emerging playwright, theatre maker and academic. Useful Links [Amazon Affiliate] My Favourite Intro to Theory Book Series US: https://amzn.to/2SpdLsz UK: https://amzn.to/2OThW1N My Camera US: https://amzn.to/2Q5nJhj UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu My Favourite Camera Lens US: https://amzn.to/2Q1s3xZ UK: https://amzn.to/2D8Rk6l
Views: 39038 Tom Nicholas
How to Use Commas Correctly -  Punctuation commas
 
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New Upload Please Watch: "Teeth Whitening Results That Will Surprise You - Banana Peel" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKLezJxf4yE --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Punctuation commas, tips on how to use commas correctly. Commas are tricky little things. Unless we are writers of a certain caliber, or editors, little do we know where exactly to put commas, why commas should be used instead of other punctuation marks or how to use commas correctly. But for all their sneakiness, commas must follow certain rules. Knowing these rules will help us master their use. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 411431 WaysAndHow
How to Use Articles ( A/ An/ The ) in English |Easy Way To Learn Articles |Free English video Online
 
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In this video,You will learn how to use Articles A/ An /The correctly with Examples. Easy ways to learn Articles in English. This video also explains different rules of using Articles A/An/The. Also watch- THREE COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH- https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=5jHz7f3dLqM ****CHECK OUT**** ALL MODALS PLAYLIST :https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHIhLHB-nOJVrulZqEKFWlHf6edH_3m8l ALL TENSES PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHIhLHB-nOJVQJSphJS2hPJBPU80av1C4 PREPOSITIONS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHIhLHB-nOJWHrFLozvCo_67cYOkwffcr For more FREE English videos, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. TRANSCRIPT- Hi friends, I am shweta today I am back with a very interesting yet confusing topic---ARTICLES. There are two Articles in English -- Indefinite Articles & Definite Article. Indefinite Articles consists of ARTICLE "A" & ARTICLE "AN" whereas Definite Article consists of ARTICLE "THE". In this session, we will learn all the three ARTICLES one by one. So lets get started with the first one------ -------INDEFINITE ARTICLES-------- Article 'A' used with Consonant sound words( व्यंजन - यदि किसी शब्द में व्यंजन का उच्चारण हो उसके साथ ARTICLE 'A' का use होगा। ) ***Examples*** a pen ( पेन में ' प' का उच्चारण है ) a university ( यूनिवर्सिटी में 'य ' का उच्चारण है ) though this word University starts with VOWEL "U" ,it gives a consonant sound. a European (यूरोपियन में ' य ' का उच्चारण है ) a one-eyed person ( वन में ' व' का उच्चारण है ) Article ' AN' used with Vowel sound words.( स्वर - यदि किसी शब्द में स्वर का उच्चारण हो उसके साथARTICLE 'AN' का use करते हैं। ) ****Examples*** an apple ( एप्पल में 'ए ' का उच्चारण है ) an honest man ( ऑनेस्ट में ' आ ' का उच्चारण है ) in this word, HONEST, "H" is silent letter, so we start our word with "onest" an hour ( ऑवर में ' आ ' का उच्चारण है ) an orange ( ऑरेंज में 'आ ' का उच्चारण है ) ----------DEFINITE ARTICLE--------- Article 'THE' used with specific/unique things ***Examples*** Before the names of---- 1. Mountains- The Himalayas, the Mt.Everest , The Alpes 2.Rivers - The Ganga, The Nile, The Yamuna 3,Holy Books - The Bible, The Gita, The Quran 4.Post - The Principal, The Director, The Postman 5.Super-power countries- The USA, The UK, The USSR, The Republic of China, The Republic of Japan. 6.Superlative Degree - The Greatest, The Highest, The Smallest, The Best 7.Historical places- The Taj mahal, The Red Fort, The Great Wall of China 8.Universal Truth- The Sun, The Moon, The Stars, The Universe That was all about the use of ARTICLES. Thanks for watching. --------FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK-------- http://yesenglishinstitute.in/ --------FOLLOW US ON YOU TUBE----------- http://www.youtube.com/c/YesInstitutelearnenglishwithconfidence
Views: 366 YES English
12 Mistakes You Make While Charging Your Phone
 
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How to Prolong the Life of Your Battery. In case the battery of your favorite gadget can't keep up with the workload and dies too quickly you must be looking for ways how to make it last longer. people still keep doing all kinds of crazy stuff because they think it’ll extend their battery life, like throwing their phone in the freezer! We’re gonna get into this plus more common mistakes people make when it comes to charging their devices and what you can do instead to prolong your phone’s battery. It turns out you don’t really have to charge your phone to the max before using it for the first time. It’s safe to use your phone while it's charging and also okay to charge it overnight. TIMESTAMPS Charging your phone to the max before using it for the first time. 1:14 Not using your phone while it's charging. 2:15 Being afraid that chargers from a different brand will kill your battery. 3:00 Thinking that turning your phone off will damage the battery. 3:40 Trying to “train” your battery. 4:13 Not charging your phone overnight for fear of damaging the battery. 4:58 Putting the battery in the freezer to make it last longer. 5:36 Using task managers to prolong battery life. 6:09 Fearing to leave your phone charger plugged in. 6:40 Not charging laptops all the time to prevent damage. 7:21 Believing that the Internet runs your battery down the fastest. 7:55 Turning off Bluetooth, GPS, and Wi-Fi to prolong the battery life. 8:42 Tips to prolong the life of your battery: Keep batteries cool. 9:28 Store batteries with a bit of charge. 10:01 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -You’ll be perfectly fine if you just buy a phone, take it out of the box, and start using it right away. -It doesn't matter whether you’re using your phone while charging or not, it’ll still charge the same exact way. -If the charger works well enough, it won't harm your mobile device. So if you need to urgently charge your phone in an emergency or the factory charger it came with doesn't work anymore, you can get any cheap version that’s compatible with your smartphone. -If you simply shut your device off from time to time, nothing dramatic will happen. In fact, some devices may actually start working more effectively after you reboot them. -Feel free to charge your phone even if the battery is as full as 90%. Charging your phone frequently doesn't hurt the battery. -If you wanna extend your battery’s lifespan, keep it charged between 40 and 80%. Believe it or not, this actually helps the battery live the longest. -Freezing your phone does nothing more than kill the battery. The thing is that lithium-ion batteries react badly to both cold and heat. -The built-in system on your phone is already dealing with everything that should be done to keep your device’s performance in tip-top shape. As for third-party task managers, they’re actually more likely to decrease your phone’s performance. -It's perfectly safe to leave your charger plugged in unless you have a damaged charger, pets at home, or no lightning protection. -Experts recommend discharging your laptop to zero percent no more than once a month. -If you’re just surfing the Net or reading articles, it doesn’t influence your battery life any more than listening to music does. -Wi-Fi consumes even less energy than your smartphone needs to maintain the cellular data connection. -Avoid leaving your smartphone, tablet, or laptop in direct sunlight or in a hot car. And definitely don’t take your gadgets to a hot place, like the beach or sauna. -The problem with storing batteries is that they lose their charge over time. And when this charge drops to zero, your battery will automatically kill itself so that it doesn’t become unstable. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2059926 BRIGHT SIDE
15 Mistakes That Shorten the Life of Your Phone
 
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How to charge the battery correctly? Why do the phone batteries decrease so quickly? We have 15 amazing tips that will make your smartphone live a longer life! Nowadays one can hardly imagine life without a cell phone. And it happens quite often that our gadgets start to act up just half a year after we bought them. It is frustrating, but in most cases, we ourselves are to blame! Let’s face it — we don’t always handle our devices properly. TIMESTAMPS Recharge your battery more often 0:45 Don’t keep the battery charging all the time 1:24 Don’t buy cheap chargers 2:01 Be careful with «ultrafast» chargers 2:28 Remove your protective case 2:49 Drain your battery from time to time 3:10 Avoid high temperatures 3:29 Avoid cold temperatures 4:02 Avoid bright wallpaper and adjust screen brightness 4:34 Watch out for voltage fluctuations 5:19 Clean the ports and wipe the display 5:45 Keep the phone far from water 6:40 Handle your phone carefully 7:15 Avoid software updates 7:42 Use cloud storage 8:29 SUMMARY - To increase your gadget’s battery life, you should recharge it more often. The best option is to do it each time the battery power indicator drops to 10-20%. This will increase the number of discharge cycles up to 1000-1100 cycles. - An inbuilt controller stops the battery from taking more current than necessary, so there is absolutely no risk of overcharging the battery and destroying it. - There have been situations when a person was using a non-native charger, and it caused a fire in the house! And another terrible thing that can happen if you use non-native chargers and cables is getting an electric shock. - We recommend you to avoid using chargers that claim to charge your battery fully in less than an hour. - If your smartphone has a bulky protective case, it might cause the device and its battery to overheat during a lengthy recharging session. - It is recommended to discharge your phone’s battery every three months to 0% and then immediately charge it to 100% to get rid of the extremes of full charge/discharge. - A high temperature is the worst thing you can imagine for lithium-ion batteries: they totally can’t stand overheating. - Carry the phone in an inner pocket of your coat or an outer pocket but encased in a protective covering. Low temperatures are harmful to the battery because it needs more power to keep itself warm enough to function. - Try to lower the brightness of your screen at least by 30-40%. - At the approach of a thunderstorm, never charge your phone. Actually, the same goes for all the electrical appliances you have. - To wipe the screen, use lint-free wipers and whatever you do, never use window cleaning liquids. They contain ammonia which can damage the screen irrevocably. - If you drop your cell phone into a pool or a sink, the first thing you should do after you get it out is turn it off and remove the battery (if it’s possible, of course). - Don’t put your cell phone on the dashboard when driving. Constant moving and bumping can cause a lot of damage. - Read user reviews before you hit the update button. The problem with such updates is that it’s either very hard or impossible to go back to the previous version of the software. - Even if you have a lot of free space on your hard drive, it’s better to use cloud storage anyway. This way your phone won’t be clogged with too much data so that it will perform much better. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 3727971 BRIGHT SIDE
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 431163 Guy Stieglitz
5 Ways to Read Faster That ACTUALLY Work - College Info Geek
 
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Reading faster is possible, even if speed reading isn't always the best way to go about it. Here are 5 methods you can use to read more books in less time. Special thanks to Scott Berkun for recording a voice-over of his quote! His books are awesome and you should read them: http://scottberkun.com/books/ --------- 7 tips for reading more books ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiNISuM4wl0&index=3&list=PLx65qkgCWNJLglnT9x2R3Kn02NQgthgJ9 The other videos in the speed reading series: Reading science ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv2BdHXRD3Q&index=4&list=PLx65qkgCWNJLglnT9x2R3Kn02NQgthgJ9 Speed reading techniques examined ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL4WMHyUhdc&index=7&list=PLx65qkgCWNJLglnT9x2R3Kn02NQgthgJ9 --------- My book "10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades" is completely free, so check it out if you're interested in improving your grades! http://collegeinfogeek.com/get-better-grades/ Companion blog post with links to great articles on reading improvement: http://collegeinfogeek.com/increasing-reading-speed/ Essential reading list for students: http://collegeinfogeek.com/essential-books-for-students/ If you want to get even more strategies and tips on becoming a more productive, successful student, subscribe to my channel right here: http://buff.ly/1vQP5ar Twitter ➔ https://twitter.com/tomfrankly Instagram ➔ https://instagram.com/tomfrankly ~ created by Thomas Frank
Views: 1040411 Thomas Frank
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
How To Google Like A Pro! Top 10 Google Search Tips & Tricks
 
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Learn how to Google Like a Pro with our TOP 10 Google Search tricks and tips that will help you find what you are looking for HARDER - FASTER - STRONGER! These are the must have Google Search Techniques that every student, teacher, researcher and journalist should know. We all know how to perform a basic Google search, but did you know that this is not the best way to Google the information you need? Whilst it is a great starting point, Google supports a wide number of search techniques for the true Google power-user and in this Epic Tutorials we show you: 1. How to Google search for an exact phrase or quote. 2. How to Exclude a word/phrase from Google search results. 3. How to search for phrases/quotes with missing words. 4. How to perform a Google Reverse Image Search. 5. How to search within a single website. 6. How to search for similar websites. 7. How to search for a cached version of a website. 8. How to search for a specific file type such as PDF. 9. How to only display results that include search term in page title. 10. How to Search Google without Using Google (and protect your privacy) READ THE ARTICLE ON OUR WEBSITE: http://epictutorials.com/top-10-google-search-tips/ Connect with Epic Tutorials online: Twitter - @ReallyEpicTuts Facebook - www.facebook.com/EpicTutorialsOfficial Website - http://epictutorials.com Google Plus - google.com/+Epictutorials
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 637668 Learn English Lab
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs COULD and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the correct use of ‘could’ and 'would’. In this lesson, I will teach you how to use these two modal verbs without mistakes. There is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. OK, there are three main differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’ that you need to know. So let’s start with the first one: This is in the use of the past tense. ‘Could’ is the past tense of ‘can’ and ‘would’ is the past tense of ‘will’. Take this sentence: “I can run a mile in 10 minutes.” This means I have this ability (to run a mile within 10 minutes). This is in the present tense but we can change it to the past by saying “I could run a mile in 10 minutes when I was younger.” It means I had the ability in the past but I don’t have it now. In this next example: “I know we will win the match.” So maybe we’re on the same team, and I tell you “I know we will win.” I’m confident. But if the match happened in the past (it’s already finished), and I want to say that I was confident, I can say “I knew we would win the match.” Here, ‘will’ becomes ‘would’. This is the first difference. The second difference relates to talking about possible situations and imaginary situations. Take this example: “It could rain tonight.” So I look at the sky and I see clouds. And I make a prediction about the future. Here’s another sentence – “John isn’t answering his phone. He could be busy.” That is I’m saying that it’s possible that he’s busy. Notice that in both of these sentences, ‘could’ is not a past tense form – it’s just used to show possibility. But I cannot use ‘would’ for this purpose. So, these are possible situations, but when we talk about imaginary situations, we prefer to use ‘would’. For example, “If I had a million dollars, I would buy a beach house.” Again, don’t be confused by the past tense. We say “If I had” and “I would buy” because we want to show that this is imagination – it’s not reality (I don’t have a million dollars). Here’s another example: “If Shirley worked hard, she would get a promotion.” This means she doesn’t work hard (she’s lazy), so she’s not going to get a promotion. Now, in both of these sentences, we can use ‘could’ to show imaginary ability but it’s less common. ‘Would’ is used a lot more when it comes to imaginary situations. This is the second difference. Let’s now move on to the third and final difference – and this is in polite expressions. There are four functions that are important for us – making suggestions, offers, requests and asking for permission. First, to make suggestions, we normally use ‘could’ as in this example: “We could try that new Italian restaurant.” So imagine that we’re planning to have dinner together and I make this suggestion. Here, using ‘would’ is wrong. But to make an offer, we prefer ‘would’. For example: “Would you like some tea?” That means, I have tea and I’m asking you if you want some. Here, we cannot use ‘could’. But making requests is different because it is possible to use both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could you open the window, please?” You can also say, “Would you open the window, please?” although this is very formal and polite. However, we also sometimes use “Would you mind…” as in “Would you mind opening the window?” This is a request, but this phrase is fixed – you cannot say “Could you mind…?” And when we ask for permission, again there are expressions with both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could I borrow your car for a couple of days?” Maybe I’m saying this to a friend, so I’m asking my friend for permission to use his or her car. I can also say, “Would it be OK if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” or “Would you mind if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” ‘Would you mind’ can be used to ask permission as well. Notice that when we use ‘would it be OK if’ or ‘would you mind if’, we use the verb in the past tense – ‘borrowed’, but that’s just a grammar rule – we’re still asking for permission for the future. Alright, these are the differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’, and if you’re ready, it’s now time for the test. There are eight sentences on the screen. In each one, I want you to choose the correct word – ‘could’ or ‘would’. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers. Let me know how many you got correct in the comments.
Views: 813149 Learn English Lab
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w
Views: 170690 Siraj Raval
When NOT to use 'to' in English - Grammar
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ "I'm going to home" or I'm going to home"? "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to school?" Why do we use 'to' with some words and not with others? In this English grammar class, I'll teach you many words that don't go with 'to'. This is a mistake that sounds bad to native speakers, so try to learn these words and stop making this mistake! Go here to take a quiz on this lesson: http://www.engvid.com/when-not-to-use-to/ TRANSCRIPT "Are you going to home?" "Are you going home?" "Where are you going?" "What are you doing?" You're watching a video. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you one trick. Finally, you will understand why in English, we say "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to work." But when we talk about our beautiful, warm, and cozy home we don't say "to". Why, why, why, I don't know. It's just English, isn't it? I can give you some clues. I'll give you some words. You will get this right away. It will be easy for you to do. So if you look at this sentence, "Are you going home?" A very, very big mistake that everyone says will be, "Are you going to home?" And I go, "No, no 'to'. Don't say 'to'. Don't say 'to', no!" Okay, okay, okay, "Are you going home?" Yes, don't say "to", but why? You learned that when you are going someplace, you say "to". For example, "Are you going to bed?" We don't say "to the bed", by the way. We just say bed. "Are you going to bed?" "Are you going to work?" Or you can use the past tense, "Did you go to work?" "Did you go to school?" "Did you go to engvid.com today, and check out a new lesson?" But when you say "home", you do not use "to". So you know the rule, maybe that this is a noun. This is a noun, so when you use going to a place which is a noun, you have to say "to", and then you come along, and you find this beautiful home, and Ronnie freaks out, because you say "to" and then you don't understand why. I don't know but I will give you a list of words that are places. But all of these words on this board, you cannot use with "to". So "are you going abroad?" You cannot ask someone, "Are you going to abroad?" If you look in the dictionary; the dictionary, one of those books. If you look at an online dictionary it'll tell you that these are adverbs of location, whereas the other ones you've learned are nouns. But hold on, "home" is a noun. Home is just this big exception going, "No, I am a noun. I don't want to have "to". All of these ones are not proper nouns, they're adverbs of location. Let's go through underground, underneath the surface of the land. If you have ever been to London, there's a big system called the Tube. It's also called the "underground". Most places in the world call it the "underground". In Canada, we call it the subway -- "sub" means "under". So you can say, "I'm going underground. I'm going underground." If you know The Jam -- "Wow, what an amazing band, Ronnie," I know. You will know this song called "I'm Going Underground." Maybe by the magic of video, we'll put on that video for you. "I'm going underground." "I'm going downtown," or you can say "uptown". I would just sing songs for everything, "Uptown Girls" -- little bit of Billy Joel for you. Uptown, downtown -- you don't need the "to". There, here, anywhere, nowhere, somewhere -- you don't need "to". In, inside, out, outside, upstairs, downstairs don't use "to". They're not nouns. They're places. One other thing to be very careful about, please, when you say this you want to say "upstairs" and "downstairs." Too many times I hear people say, "I went down-stair." Only one, just one stair, I made it. "I went up-stair." And then what did you do? You just stood there? Wow, don't say "down-stair, up-stair". Please use all of the stairs. Go up, okay? That'll be fun, more exciting. You can fall down the stairs too, that's fun. But again, we don't say "to". "I'm going downstairs." "I'm coming upstairs." If you are confused, or if you have ever been confused about when to use "to", the only advice I can give you is please remember this list of words. Once you have remembered this list, you'll go, "Oh that was easy." [That was easy.]" Yes, it was. Thank you, goodbye.
Basic English Grammar - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ What is a noun? What is a verb? What is an adjective? AHHHHH!!! Learn how to recognize nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in this important basic grammar lesson. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/basics-noun-verb-adjective-adverb/
30 THINGS YOU KEEP DOING WRONG
 
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Change your perspective on the common things you used to do wrong! You'll thank me later! 😉 Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY: https://goo.gl/fWbJqz Subscribe to 5-Minute Workouts: https://goo.gl/67owiQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: 5-Minute Crafts KIDS: https://goo.gl/PEuLVt Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 22135704 5-Minute Crafts
How to use ‘HAVE HAD’ correctly in one sentence? English Grammar Rules Lesson for Beginners
 
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How to use ‘HAVE HAD’ correctly in one sentence? English Grammar Rules Lesson for Beginners by Rachna. You have watched English Grammar videos about how to use have and had in English and know the grammar rules. But have you wondered how to use ‘have had’ together in one single sentence in an English conversation. Well, in today’s English Grammar lesson for beginners, understand this so that you don’t make any Grammar mistakes in English while speaking English or writing and IELTS test or an school exam. Clear this confusing grammar concept. This phrase even confuses students who appear for competitive exams such as Bank PO, UPSC as they know how to use have and had separately but using it together in one sentence is quite tricky. For more such English grammar lesson visit our channel and watch a library of more than 1300+ free English speaking practice lessons to improve your English and speak English fluently and confidently just like a native English speaker. We have videos for Personal development, Accent Training, American Accent, British English , IELTS training and coaching, Tips on How to speak English easily and much more to enhance your English communication skills. For complete lesson transcript visit us at – http://www.learnex.in/ ===================================================== Our Social media – 👉Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Instagram – @letstalkpodcast http://www.instagram.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Twitter – @letstalkone http://www.twitter.com/letstalkone ===================================================== 👉Watch the latest English lesson series from Auckland, New Zealand – English Unplugged https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeaP-vXhB1A&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhBSnlvoMe_A-Bo4gveK9IZ 👉English lessons by Niharika – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skyJpfNHZIc&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjTZUl5oC_Uq1NJXCbrnBiW 👉Watch all English lessons by KAT – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfeKs7ahQTk&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjE3HNjiX2ksW6jydromKHl 👉English Lessons by Jack – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvWQd6v1jkM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhjDNVmT7IM9lxVD-Vl-NVK 👉English lessons by Michelle – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XPQf9cr0Y8&list=PL4BuO6Ugthvjx0YWu4RHS-KNOh-bh5ZHb 👉English lessons by Ceema – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMp8C77YSHc&list=PL4BuO6UgthviLgmC2kW3dQPTg8MUYv2Pq 👉English lessons by Rachna – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRMTQdkYO2o&list=PL4BuO6UgthvglK4gC3RJXJiyAmtYOqb_o ====================================== Topic wise English lessons – 👉English Vocabulary – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XPQf9cr0Y8&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgLdq2PPXHJB4R3ZiH2MJBL 👉English Idioms – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihWPED210CM&list=PL4BuO6UgthviusM2zZGOtUluJl1Olo2r1 👉Learn English Grammar – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCBkQrNyhho&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjzXaE7u0D0ul2zu8_wJmJP 👉English Conversation Topics – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7I3vZx_pNM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhBE67P2YmFUPUGh79w6Z7M 👉Spoken English Tips & Tricks- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwEWta-iqI4&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhvytDIk09zJZqIP0u6--Xy 👉IELTS Training & Coaching – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1v82mTRz1uM&list=PL4BuO6Ugthvijluk3yDSbzONtUCLGg042 👉Personality Development & Enhancement – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5jE46jjTFk&list=PL4012CC6F757342DB 👉Business English Lessons – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7I3vZx_pNM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgyeE4lhi_1RFoJoSQXmMrI 👉Job Interview Skills – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5jE46jjTFk&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgNZQtMKHl4_OeTK-AjyBJX ================================================ Our Other Channels - 👉Skillopedia - Skills for the real world http://www.youtube.com/skillopedia 👉Daily Video Vocabulary - Learn a new English Word dailyhttp://www.youtube.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Learn English through Hindi - Learnex https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtArm3-faI7bOK-6J-H-SPA
Articles A/AN/THE, where and how to use Articles, Basic English
 
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Learn sentence formation with the help of Articles. Correct grammar usage alongwith where and when to use Articles.
Views: 438 Moose Crypto
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1687748 Learn English Lab
HOW TO LEARN  ARTICLES FASTER-THE BEST FUN FULL WAY LEARNING VIDEO TUTORIAL FOR KIDS TO ALL
 
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Hi everyone. This video is HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH ARTICLES IN THE FUN FULL WAYS- VIDEO TUTORIAL FOR KIDS/ . We can't speak or write correctly without the using of Articles correctly. So knowledge of article is necessary.. peoples with English as their mother tongue don't have any problem in grammatically correct sentences and articles at the right places. But peoples with English as a second language CHILDREN/ STUDENTS OR ALL AGED LEARNERS. Learners face various problems while learning or using English. So in this easy but very effective video tutorial for Article learning will definitely help the learners to understand and use the articles in their day to day life situation. The lesson is explained with a lot of graphical pictures . Those are drawn by me for this teaching and learning purpose. This video can be used by the all aged groups like kids/ child/ children/ students/ college students/ job seekers/ servants and all others very effectively. Because it's each area has been explained by good and attractive hand drawn graphics(i have used my own ring photos also) For example definite article"The"having so many rules to use that article Example. 1 Article THE - should be used with the superlative degrees 1- Rose is THE most beautiful flower 2- Asia is THE BIGGEST continent in the world. So after watching this video tutorial we can get some fair knowledge about the Definite article THE And its usage. I have created all the content and graphics myself. I have had the YOUTUBE'S Music library"s free music as my videos Background Music... please share your point of views and feed back after watching this.. if you don't mind Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE My video channel Thank you very much For more videos please visit baalamuruganarul.blogspot.com Or my YouTube channel SUBSCRIBE ME IF YOU WISH THANK YOU VERY
Fix Your English Grammar Mistakes: Talking about People
 
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Should you say "most of people" or "most people"? "Brazilian people" or "Brazilians"? "Every people" or "everybody"? If you're not 100% sure, this lesson is for you. In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about people correctly in English. This is an important subject because, in conversation, we often talk about things people do. I'll teach you the grammar behind common sentences and statements. You'll learn to use these sentence structures correctly and to avoid mistakes that many English learners make. Then take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/fix-your-english-grammar-mistakes-talking-about-people/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about some mistakes a lot of students make. So, I've been teaching English for about five years now, and the mistakes I'm going to teach you today, I've seen students make many times in both their speaking, as well as their writing. Okay? So these mistakes are mistakes students make when they're talking about people. So, I'm going to give you some examples of some of these mistakes. The first one I want to show you: "Some Canadian people hate winter." It's true, I'm one of those people; I hate winter. So, "Some Canadian people hate winter." There's a mistake, here. I want you to take a moment to look, and think: What could the mistake be? "Some Canadian people hate winter." I'll give you a hint: The mistake is somewhere here. If you thought "people" is the mistake, you're correct. "Canadian people", it's redundant. We don't need the word "people", because "Canadian"... If we add an "s" here, this means "Canadian people". Okay? So, instead of saying "Canadian people", we would say "Canadians". "Some Canadians hate winter." It's the same if we wanted to talk about Americans. We would not say: "Some American people hate winter." We would prefer to say: "Some Americans"-with an "s"-"hate winter". So, let's look at another example. "Many Brazilian people are learning English." So, there's a mistake, here. What's the mistake? "Many Brazilian people are learning English." If you said the mistake was "people", you're correct. When we're talking about nationalities, we do not use the word "people". So, what can we do to fix this? We can get rid of the word "people", and what can we do to the word "Brazilian", because there's more than one? We can add an "s". So, now it's: "Many Brazilians are learning English." Okay? So, I'm going to give you another example, this time not on the board, but I'm just going to say it. "Many Asian people like spicy food.", "Many Asian people like spicy food." Now, how would you fix this sentence? If you said: "Many Asians like spicy food." you'd be correct. So, when we talk about nationalities, we do not need this word; this word is a waste of space. We just need the nationality with an "s". So, I have another common mistake students make over here: "Muslim people". So, Muslim is a religion. Okay? "Muslim people fast"-"fast" means they don't eat-"during Ramadan". "Muslim people fast during Ramadan." It means Muslim people do not eat during their holy month, their religious month of Ramadan. So, there's a mistake, here. What do you think the mistake is? If you said, just like this, "people" is the mistake - you're correct. When we talk about religion and we're talking about Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus - you don't need the word "people". We could just change this to: "Muslims". So, "Muslim" here means a whole... All Muslims, it's like Muslim people, but we don't need the word "people". Here's another example: "Christian people celebrate Easter.", "Christian people celebrate Easter." How can we fix this sentence? We can get rid of the word "people", and just add an "s". We can do the same thing for Hindus. "Hindus are often vegetarian", we could say. "Many Jews live in Israel.", "Many Buddhists live in Asia." Okay? So, instead of saying: "Jewish people", "Hindu people", it's easier just to say "Hindu" with an "s" or "Jews" with an "s". All right, so let's look at some other common mistakes students make. Okay, so another mistake I often see students make in their writing especially, and also sometimes in their speaking is with "most", "some", and "a lot" when they're using these words with "people". Okay? So, the first example: "Most of people have cell phones these days." I see students use: "Most of people" a lot in their essays. So, what's the mistake, here? I'll give you a minute to think about it. "Most of people". The problem here is "of". Okay? We don't need "of"; "of" is incorrect here. We would just say: "Most people". "Most people have cell phones these days." Okay? "Most people love Chinese food.", "Most people like to play sports." You don't need "of". If you had: "Most of the people", that would be okay, but you need "the" here, although that's not as common.
How To Write A Research Paper Fast -  Research Paper Writing Tips
 
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New Upload Please Watch: "Teeth Whitening Results That Will Surprise You - Banana Peel" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKLezJxf4yE --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Research paper writing tips, step by step tutorial and tips on how to write a research paper fast. Through the course of school, and sometimes your career, you have to write a research paper at one time or another. Usually you know enough about what to write; however, writing is seldom anyone's favorite way to spend time. In the pileup of work, writing often sinks to the bottom of priorities. At crunch time, you then need to double up in your efforts to make the deadline. Only the knowledge of how to write a research paper fast can save you. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 472306 WaysAndHow
8 English Sentences: Find the Mistakes
 
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Can you find the mistakes in these English sentences? In today's lesson, you'll review 8 grammar rules of correct English sentences. You'll get to practice correcting sentences with me in the video. Once you learn these easy grammar rules, you'll avoid making common mistakes and improve your marks on English essays and exams like IELTS, TOEFL, and TOEIC. To test if you really understand these rules, take the quiz. Good luck with your English! http://www.engvid.com/8-english-sentences-find-the-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, my name's Rebecca. For the next few minutes, let's pretend you are the English teacher and you're correcting your student's homework. Let's look at some of these sentences and see if you can find some of the errors in these English sentences. Okay, the first sentence: "My mother she works in a bank." Is that okay? Well, let me tell you right now that actually none of these sentences are okay; there is a mistake in every sentence. So see if you can find the mistake. Okay? "My mother she works in a bank." What's the mistake? Okay... Here, "she", all right? I'm just going to grab a different marker. So what happened here is we said: "My mother she works in a bank." So we cannot repeat the subject. The mistake here is that we had a double subject; the subject was mentioned twice. In English, you can't do that. You just mention the subject once. So this sentence, in order to be correct, would need to be: "My mother works in a bank." Or: "She works in a bank." If you know who "she" is. Right? But you can't say both. So no double subjects. Number two: "John is an engineer" What's wrong with that? Look carefully. Well, what's wrong is that it's missing the punctuation. All right? Part of a correct sentence is correct punctuation. So here, there was no period at the end of the sentence, that's what was wrong. Next sentence: "The manager of my department" What's wrong with that? Well, what's wrong is that it's not a sentence because it doesn't have any verb, there's no verb there. Okay? And, of course, you need to continue this sentence, and then eventually you'd need to have some punctuation as well. But basically, there is no... This is a sentence fragment. This is called only a part of a sentence. It is not a complete English sentence or a correct English sentence. There is no verb. Missing verb. Next one: "we enjoy watching old movies." Okay? Again, look carefully. What's wrong there? Well, it has a subject, it has a verb, but this is the problem. The first letter in the first word of an English sentence has to be capitalized and that's what was missing here. You see, we didn't have that problem before. Okay. Next one: "I like very much Chinese food." Okay? Maybe that sounds okay to you, but doesn't sound okay to me. It's close, but not quite. What's wrong? Well, what's wrong here is this, the word order. Not only do you need to have certain elements, you need to have the words in the right order. So in English, the correct order for this sentence would be: "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Not: "very much Chinese food." "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Next: "Maria need help with her hw." "Maria need help with her homework." What's wrong there? Okay? So the mistake is here, the mistake is in subject-verb agreement. The verb has to agree with the subject. Right? And if we say: "Maria", it's like: "she", and we would have to say: "She needs". "Maria needs help with her hw." So the error here was in subject-verb agreement. Next one: "delivered the package yesterday" Okay? "delivered the package yesterday" What's wrong here? Well, it's similar to this one, except here, we had a sentence fragment and we had the subject. Here, we have a sentence fragment, and we have a verb, but we don't have a subject. We have a missing subject. So this is also a sentence fragment. "Fragment" means only part. It is not a complete sentence. Next one: "We recieved your letter." "We recieved your letter." Sounds fine, but if you're an English teacher, you're going to look really carefully at each of the words. And what's wrong is here, the mistake is here. It's a spelling mistake. Okay? The word "received" is one of those tricky words with the "e" and the "i", and the "i" and the "e" that you have to learn very well. So spelling mistakes will also bring down your marks. If you're doing the IELTS, if you're bring... Doing the TOEFL, any errors of this kind will bring your marks down. Okay? So even though they seem very basic, I know from experience that students make all of these mistakes. Be very careful not to make them. Let's look at what principles apply to correct English sentences. Okay? So, an English sentence must express a complete thought and it must express it with certain elements. Now, just because a sentence must express a complete thought, it doesn't have to have a lot of words; it doesn't have to be a very long sentence.
50 Words You're Pronouncing WRONGLY Right Now! | Top 50 Mispronounced English Words, Common Mistakes
 
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Learn the TOP 50 MISPRONOUNCED English words. These words are common mistakes made by many English learners. I will show you how to avoid these incorrect pronunciations and say all of these words correctly in this pronunciation lesson. For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I will show you fifty words that you are probably pronouncing incorrectly right now. And I’ll also teach you how to say them correctly. Let’s start with this word – how do you say it? Well, we say /prə-’nauns/, /prə-’naunst/ and /prə-’nauns-iŋ/, but /prə-nən- si-’eɪ-shən/. There’s no ‘noun’ in this word. It’s ‘pronunciation.’ Word number two is ‘says’. This word is commonly mispronounced by people learning English as /s eɪs/. But remember: I say, you say, but he or she /sez/. Number three is ‘et cetera’. A very common incorrect pronunciation is to say ‘ek’ – ‘ek setra’ instead of ‘et’. Don’t say that. And also remember that the stress is on ‘ce’. So the word is /et-’se- tə-rə/. You will also hear /et-’se-trə/ – that is less common but it’s OK too. Next up is ‘often’. Some pronounce this as /’äf-tən/. Now, strictly speaking, /’äf- tən/ is not wrong, but the more common pronunciation is with the ‘t’ silent, so I recommend that you always say /’ä-fən/. One word that is often mispronounced by learners of English is ‘women’. This is, of course, because of the English language’s crazy spelling system. But remember that we say /’wu-mən/ for one woman and /’wi-min/ for the plural – /’wi-min/. Word number six is ‘police’. This isn’t /po-lees/ or /po- lis/. It’s /pə/ and /lees/ with the stress on /lees/. So /pə-’lees/. The next word is ‘vehicle’. It’s often pronounced wrongly as /ve-hi-kl/. But the ‘e’ is a long vowel and the ‘h’ is silent. So /’vee-ə-kl/. Number eight is this word. How would you say it? The correct pronunciation is /’zhän-rə/. Pay attention to the first sound, it’s like ‘sh’ but you put your voice into it - /’zhän-rə/. /’zhän-rə/ Next up is actually what you’re watching right now – ‘video’. The important thing is that both the ‘i’ and the ‘e’ are pronounced as short ‘i’ sounds. It’s not /vee-di-o/, it’s /’vi-di-o/. If you watch a video on YouTube or Facebook, you might leave a ‘comment’. I have heard many speakers say /’kə-ment/. Now whether you use this word as a noun or a verb, the first syllable is always /’kä /. So it’s never a /’kə-ment/, it’s a /’kä-ment/. Word number eleven is ‘interesting’. This is mispronounced sometimes as /’in-tə-rə-stiŋ/. But there are only three syllables – /in / – /trə / – /stiŋ/ and the stress is on ‘IN’. So the word is /’in-trə-stiŋ/. Number twelve is ‘hotel’. There are two syllables – /ho/ and / tel/ like the English word ‘tell’ as in ‘tell me’. The stress is on the second syllable, so /ho-’tel/. A related word is ‘suite’. This means a set of connected rooms in a hotel and this is wrongly pronounced by many people as /soot/. But it’s /sweet/ - like when you eat a piece of candy - /sweet/. While we’re on the topic of suites and hotels, I cannot leave out this word – ‘restaurant’. It gives a lot of English learners trouble. But, don’t let the fancy spelling confuse you – the second syllable is just /tə /. The third is /ränt/. So /’res-tə- ränt/. In British English, you might hear just two syllables – /’res-trɒnt/ - that is also correct. After you eat at a restaurant, you have to pay the bill. But you might get a discount on your bill if you have one of these – a ‘coupon’. A common incorrect pronunciation is /’koo-pən/. But the second syllable should be /pän/. So – /’koo-pän/. Here’s word number sixteen – how would you say it? The proper pronunciation is not ‘break’ ‘fast’ – it’s ‘breakfast’. /brek / with a short /e/ sound and /fəst/ with an /ə/ sound - so /’brek-fəst/. You know what I had for breakfast today? I had this – ‘pizza’. Really, I did. It’s not a /pee-sə/ and it’s not a /peed-zə/. There’s no /z/ sound in this word. It’s /peet/, /sə/ - /’peet-sə/. Another food word that’s mispronounced a lot is ‘vegetable’. It’s not /ve-jə- tə-bl/. If you say it correctly, there are only three syllables - /vej/, / tə/, /bl/ - /’vej- tə-bl/. Let’s talk about a couple of vegetables now – this is a ‘cucumber’. It’s not a /ku- koom-bər/. Think of it like saying the letter ‘Q’ and then /kəm-bər/ like ‘number’. So /’kyoo-kəm-bər/. This vegetable is called ‘lettuce’. I know the spelling looks like /let-yoos/ but it’s not – it’s /letis/. And since we talking about food, here’s a food that just about everybody loves – ‘chocolate’. When you ask for this at the store, make sure there are only two syllables – /chäk / and /lət/ - /’chäk-lət/. And remember: there is no ‘late’ in ‘chocolate’. Speaking of chocolate, how would you say this word? This is ‘dessert’.
Views: 4324366 Learn English Lab
All Prepositions in English Grammar with Examples in Hindi | Learn Use of Prepositions Tips & Tricks
 
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इस वीडियो All Prepositions in English Grammar with Examples in Hindi | Learn Use of Prepositions Tips & Tricks में सभी Prepositions Examples के साथ बताये गये हैं। ये वीडियो Prepositions पर आपके Basic Concept को बिल्कुल Clear कर देगा। नये Subscribers के लिए Basic से शुरू Lecture 1, 2, 3.... https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5eX6gADDo5ZHykXBaXYpVO Competitive English Grammar Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JLN-ZOtivNwide92ToFZx Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/englishwaledotcom/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spoken_english_guru_adityarana/ FREE Android App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.qtime.spokenenglishguru Spoken English Book & Daily Use Sentences' Book: http://bit.ly/2Oj7zUF All Video Lectures’ Lesson-wise Pen Drive - http://bit.ly/2wlxv6N Free PDF eBook: http://bit.ly/2LYwO8q FREE CHARTS: http://bit.ly/2LVtbAd FREE Practice Ex: http://bit.ly/2Mz4XRI Complete English Speaking Course Lesson-wise Videos (250+ Videos) Link: Lesson 1: English सीखने की शुरूआत https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xW_8t2mMZStWZFEdKdvAc Lesson 2: Parts of Speech https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Lesson 3: Simple Sentences - Present, Past & Future https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Lesson 4: सभी 12 Tenses सीखो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Lesson 5: Modal Helping Verbs in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Lesson 6: All Prepositions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Lesson 7: All Conjunctions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Lesson 8: Daily Use English Sentences https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Lesson 9: Vocabulary Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7Ny0kgrgXfoltFX8zxMr10 Lesson 10: Daily English Speaking Practice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5RSgM5wsAbCbTMXi9AAJFh Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4myjPpnomQnvU37GUbXE2s Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation & Tricks https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6n6xk9pPe1xUc3VhAB6Ra0 Lesson 13: Active and Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Lesson 14: Be Being Been | Concept & Use https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Lesson 15: Advance Grammar & Spoken Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Lesson 16: Gerund, Infinitives and Participles https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5DdSQoWpx85VqxzMr8Rbkf Lesson 17: Phrasal Verbs in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4N0emQQe7ZjjzwbcB9jRdQ Lesson 18: English Practice Exercises & Test Papers https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Lesson 19: English के Doubts Clear करो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7gZn51MoIEMOvLd36mzdKl Lesson 20: English Conversations https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh Lesson 21: English Speaking with Kids https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JDlK6GUD3KkyqzbdGZSXm Lesson 22: Listening Practice Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5b-qNJZTsRYqUqGmOsb9N1 Lesson 23: Pronunciation & Sound Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Lesson 24: Do you know? इंग्लिश की छोटी-2 बातें https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Lesson 25: Subject Verb Agreement for Competitive Exams https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6lS-vakv_E76Ill-AUH-g9 Lesson 26: Interviews Questions & Tips https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AzcTWgqWpQpRkOeQuuSMd Lesson 27: Letter Writing in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5FG7i2wA5bMxcTr7OxnGyi #prepositions #allprepositions #spokenenglishguru
Views: 1218223 Spoken English Guru
Basic English Grammar - "Was" and "Were"
 
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http://www.engvid.com When to use WAS and when to use WERE. Learn about the past tense of TO BE -- the most important verb in English! I talk about normal sentences, negatives, and questions. I cover the grammar, but also the correct pronunciation. After you've watched the lesson, test yourself at http://www.engvid.com/was-were/#quiz!
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
ON Haitian Creole - The Definite Articles PT2 - Proper Position
 
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Support on PayPal: paypal.me/ONLanguages ON Dialects and Languages presents part 2 in our series on the "Definite Articles" in Haitian Creole. In this lesson we review the 4 definite articles used in Haitian Creole and the rules that govern when they are to be used. Then we add another layer to this lesson by reviewing examples where the definite articles are placed in other positions in a sentence and not immediately following the word it qualifies. Also we work on vocabulary building by using some Kreyòl words to give examples of the correct way to use the definite articles. Please be sure to follow through with the other parts of this lesson for a more thorough understanding this concept. Also, please see the free PDF of the lesson in the link below. Remember to practice, practice, practice. Keep up with these lessons and you will be well on your way to speaking, understanding, and having complete fluency in Haitian Creole. It's ON! Like, comment, and subscribe. For more resources and information, visit our website at: https://ondialectsandlanguages.com Free PDF of today's lesson: Coming Soon! Take our quiz and test your retention of today's phrases: Coming Soon! Support on PayPal: paypal.me/ONLanguages
8 Common Grammar Mistakes in English!
 
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"What's the different"? "Today morning"? "I enjoyed"? Improve your grammar by correcting the common mistakes in these English sentences. A good review for all students, especially at intermediate and advanced levels. Also check our full resource of 100 Common Grammar Mistakes in English at http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ Quiz: http://www.engvid.com/8-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. In this lesson, you'll have a chance to review eight common English errors. So, let's see how you do. The first one: "Today morning I woke up late." So, what's wrong with that? There is actually something wrong with each and every one of these. I'll tell you that in advance; there's no... There are no tricks here. Okay? So, what's wrong with that sentence? "Today morning I woke up late." Well, it should be: "This morning". Okay? We don't say: "Today morning". We say: "This morning". Number two: "What's the different?" What's the different? Well, that's wrong too, because "different" is an adjective. What you want to use here is the noun. So, what's the noun of this word? "Difference". "What's the difference?" Okay? This is a really common error, so make sure you don't make this one. Next one: "I met John two years before." Okay? What's wrong with that? Well, over here, we can't say: "I met John two years before." We can say: "I met two... I met John two years ago." All right? If you use the word "before", then you have to say before something. "Before I graduated". Okay? "Before I got married", or whatever. But you can't use "before" by itself. So the proper word there is "ago". "I met John two years ago." Next one: "This is a six-months course." That sounds almost okay, but it's not okay. So the mistake here is with the "s". When we use this expression, it becomes... The entire expression becomes an adjective for the noun "course". So we should say: "This is a six-month course.", "This is a million dollar contract." And so on. Okay? That's another... Each of these is a different element of grammar, different aspect of grammar, and so on. Next, number five: "Thank you. I really enjoyed." What's wrong with that? Well, the problem is here. "Enjoyed" is a reflexive verb, so you would need to say: "I really enjoyed myself.", "I really enjoyed myself.", "He enjoyed himself.", "She enjoyed herself.", "We enjoyed ourselves.", "They enjoyed themselves." Okay? So there are certain reflexive verbs in English, and we need to use them correctly. That's one of them. Very common one. Okay, number six: "Did you loose your cellphone?" What's wrong with that? I helped you a little bit by actually showing you where the error is. So, many people make this error. This is actually a spelling mistake. You should be spelling the word this way. "Did you lose your cellphone?" "Loose" is an adjective which means not tight, and "lose" is the opposite of "find". Okay? "Did you lose your cellphone?" Also, the pronunciation is "lose" and not "loose". Next one: "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic course." So, what was wrong with what I said there? Okay? So, what was wrong was my pronunciation of that. So many people mispronounce this word. It is not "academic". It is "academic". The stress is on the middle. Academic. "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic program." Okay? So, if... In case you make that mistake. I'm not saying you do. In case you do, make sure you correct it. Last one: "Yes, I have a free time." Is that...? What's wrong there? What's going on? Okay, here. We don't need to say: "A free time". We need to say: "Free time", because this is a... Time is an uncountable noun. Now, each one of these examples represents a different aspect of grammar. So, how can you possibly learn all of them? Well, I'll give you two easy ways to help you out. One is to go to our website: www.engvid.com, because there, we have currently I think more than 700 lessons on different aspects of English grammar and of English in general for exams, for writing, speaking, all kinds of things. And by watching them, you can find the lessons that you actually need. And the other thing is that we also have... I've written actually a resource which might help you, which shows 50 such common errors that people make in English, and that might help you out as well. Okay? So, I hope you did well, and I hope you continue to do better and better in English. All the best with your English. Bye for now.
How to change a verb into a noun!
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ With the simple addition of '-ment' or '-ion' to a verb, it becomes a noun! Learn how to change a verb into a noun in this grammar lesson. It's pretty simple, once you understand how it works. Test your skills with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/change-verbs-into-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, my name is Ronnie. I am going to teach you some English. It's going to be great. It's going to be easy, I think. Something that a lot of you have difficulty with in English is nouns, verbs, adjectives, and all those other crazy, crazy things we have in English. I'm going to teach you two tricks that will help you, when you are trying to figure out if a word is a verb or a noun, or when to use a verb. Is it a noun? Do what? So today's lesson is the birth of a noun. You are going to take a verb, it's going to do some magical things, and by the end of the lesson it is going to become a noun, so birth of a noun. How to change a verb to a noun, the first thing we are going to do is have a look at the verbs. We have the verb "employ, develop, move, judge, advertise, and establish." Do you think you see a spelling mistake here? Are you wondering why this is an "s" and not a "z-ed," well, let me tell you something. In the UK also known as England, they would spell it with a zed, whereas in North America we spell it with an "s." So there is a spelling difference. And so, you might see it spelled with a "zed" or an "s." Both of them are correct, if you have spellcheck when you are typing something, it might go wrong. But you might have American spellcheck, so just be careful. So, either "zed" or "s" is correct. "Employ" do you know what that verb means? Have you heard that word, "employ?" It means use or work. The next one we have is "develop;" if you "develop" something it basically means you help to grow. The next one is move. I am moving my right hand, but not my left hand. That would cause much problem. The next one is judge. There's a noun of "judge" and a verb of "judge." To "judge" something means to give your opinion. The next one is "advertise." The "s" and the "zed" the pronunciation is the same. Don't worry. "Advertise" means to tell something, usually you do it for money. You "advertise" something on a website, or you advertise on TV to get a product, to make you money. The next one is "establish, establish means to make something. What we're going to do, two tricks. The first trick is we're going to take these verbs, and we are going to add four letters to make it a noun. The letters are "m-e-n-t." So we have the verb "employ." The noun changes to "employment." Did you just say mint and not m-e-n-t? I did, English pronunciation is difficult. In English we don't say employment, we actually say it like this word, "m-i-n-t." Like a breath mint. So all of these words you must spell with "m-e-n-t," but your pronunciation is going to be "m-i-n-t," like "mint, employment." The next one we have is a "development." "Employment" means job. "Development," we use it to mean an area that has been "developed." You could use it to say it's a building; this is a "development" of this country, or a building of a company. "Move," we have the noun of movement. "Move, move," not "move, move," do you know why I got distracted? Because, I was thinking of a Bob Marley song that's called "A Movement of the People, "movement" of the people. If anyone is a Bob Marley fan out there. "Movement" of people is a good way to remember what this word means. "Movement" basically means a group of people who try and change something in society, so a "movement" is a group of people. The next one is "judge, judgment." It means the same, the noun, and the verb. You give your opinion of something. "Advertisement," an "advertisement" you will see on the subway. You will see everywhere you go, everywhere you look. In the world, people are trying to sell you something in an "advertisement." We usually shorten the word, and just call it an "ad." Next one is "establish," changes to "establishment." For some reason I don't like the word "establishment." "Establishment" means something that has been "established." We usually use it in the form of government or politics; it can also mean a place like a restaurant. I like restaurants. The next trick, trick number one is you take the verb you change it to a noun using "m-e-n-t" or "m-i-n-t" "employment." The next one is this word, "act."
Newspaper Article English to Hindi Translation| Vocabulary Words English Learn with Meaning in Hindi
 
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This video " Newspaper Article English to Hindi Translation Ex - 1 | Vocabulary Words English Learn with Meaning" improves your vocabulary and strengthen your English Structures' making skills. I suggest you guys to read the newspaper every day for as much time as you can spare in your busy life. Reading newspaper articles is vital for English learning because it lets you know about several interesting structures, which you may probably neither use in writing, nor in conversations. Keep learning. Love you all. Aditya Sir. नये Subscribers के लिए Basic से शुरू Lecture 1, 2, 3.... https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5eX6gADDo5ZHykXBaXYpVO Competitive English Grammar Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JLN-ZOtivNwide92ToFZx Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/englishwaledotcom/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spoken_english_guru_adityarana/ FREE Android App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.qtime.spokenenglishguru Spoken English Book & Daily Use Sentences' Book: http://bit.ly/2Oj7zUF All Video Lectures’ Lesson-wise Pen Drive - http://bit.ly/2wlxv6N Free PDF eBook: http://bit.ly/2LYwO8q FREE CHARTS: http://bit.ly/2LVtbAd FREE Practice Ex: http://bit.ly/2Mz4XRI Complete English Speaking Course Lesson-wise Videos (250+ Videos) Link: Lesson 1: English सीखने की शुरूआत https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xW_8t2mMZStWZFEdKdvAc Lesson 2: Parts of Speech https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Lesson 3: Simple Sentences - Present, Past & Future https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Lesson 4: सभी 12 Tenses सीखो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Lesson 5: Modal Helping Verbs in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Lesson 6: All Prepositions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Lesson 7: All Conjunctions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Lesson 8: Daily Use English Sentences https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Lesson 9: Vocabulary Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7Ny0kgrgXfoltFX8zxMr10 Lesson 10: Daily English Speaking Practice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5RSgM5wsAbCbTMXi9AAJFh Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4myjPpnomQnvU37GUbXE2s Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation & Tricks https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6n6xk9pPe1xUc3VhAB6Ra0 Lesson 13: Active and Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Lesson 14: Be Being Been | Concept & Use https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Lesson 15: Advance Grammar & Spoken Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Lesson 16: Gerund, Infinitives and Participles https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5DdSQoWpx85VqxzMr8Rbkf Lesson 17: Phrasal Verbs in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4N0emQQe7ZjjzwbcB9jRdQ Lesson 18: English Practice Exercises & Test Papers https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Lesson 19: English के Doubts Clear करो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7gZn51MoIEMOvLd36mzdKl Lesson 20: English Conversations https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh Lesson 21: English Speaking with Kids https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JDlK6GUD3KkyqzbdGZSXm Lesson 22: Listening Practice Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5b-qNJZTsRYqUqGmOsb9N1 Lesson 23: Pronunciation & Sound Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Lesson 24: Do you know? इंग्लिश की छोटी-2 बातें https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Lesson 25: Subject Verb Agreement for Competitive Exams https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6lS-vakv_E76Ill-AUH-g9 Lesson 26: Interviews Questions & Tips https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AzcTWgqWpQpRkOeQuuSMd Lesson 27: Letter Writing in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5FG7i2wA5bMxcTr7OxnGyi #spokanenglishguru #englishspeakingcourse
Views: 332204 Spoken English Guru
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 2037336 Learn English Lab
A guide to Harvard Referencing
 
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Jonny, a student at the University of Derby, explains Harvard Referencing. He discusses how to use citations and how to reference different sources such as books, journals and websites. http://www.derby.ac.uk/studyskills http://www.derby.ac.uk/library/study-skills/citing-and-referencing
Views: 573156 University of Derby
Articles pt. 2 Grade 2 Teaching English The Fun Way
 
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After the class reviewed articles together on the board it was the students turn to put singular nouns on the board under the correct article: a, an, the. The students did a very good job. They know how to use articles. There was also a lot of team work and cooperation taking place. The students are often loud, but I do not want to quell their enthusiasm. In a student centered class the teacher does not determine everything, and that may include how loud the students are. I do ask them to quiet down at times if the shouting seems needless, or aggressive.
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. Contents: 1. How to Build a Simple Sentence 0:32 2. Complements - What Comes Next? 2:58 3. Adding Description to Your Sentences 8:43 4. How to Make Complex Sentences with Independent Clauses 11:41 5. How to Make Complex Sentences with Dependent Clauses 15:36 To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 429986 Oxford Online English
Article in English Grammar || Position of Article || Article A, An & The || English with Ranjan sir
 
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In this video You will get the important Rules of Position of Article. This is the section where most students commit mistake while making common errors. Article in English Grammar || Position of Article || Article A, An & The || English with Ranjan sir #ArticleinEnglish #EnglishGrammar #EnglishGuru
What Is an Article (with Examples) and Prepositons Continued
 
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In this video, I'll teach you about prepositions in English grammar and how to use articles in English. All images used a creative commons and labeled for reuse. Here are the sources for the information: https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/prepositions.htm https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/594/01/ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/540/01/ The songs used are Waves by Joakim Karud, Me 2 by Lakey Inspired, and That Girl by Lakey Insired. Lakey Inspired Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOmy8wuTpC95lefU5d1dt2Q This is licenced to use under creative commons: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Here is Joakim Karud's policy on using his music: http://www.joakimkarud.com/use-my-music/
Views: 50 Julian Taylor
Writing in English - Comma Splices & 4 easy ways to fix them
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you know what a comma splice is? Learn about one of the most common writing mistakes that students make and four easy ways to correct it. This free lesson will help you to become a better writer. You can also test yourself with the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/comma-splices/ !
Using Should, Could and Would have done correctly - English Grammar lesson
 
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Using Should | Could | Would have done correctly -- English Grammar lesson Take the test : http://www.learnex.in/using-should-could-would-have-done-correctly A lot of people get confused while using should/could/would with 'have + past participle verb'. In this lesson, you will understand the difference between three sentence structures and when to use them appropriately. 1. I should have completed my graduation : ('should' is used when a past duty/obligation not fulfilled. Also, when something was the correct thing to do in the past.) You should have been more careful while travelling. (something that was the right thing to do in the past, but you didn't) 2. I could have completed my graduation : ('could' is used to express a past possibility, or an option you had in the past). You could have helped me yesterday . (you had the option to help, but you chose not to) 3. I would have completed my graduation : ('would' is used to express that you do or don't do something due to circumstances and is used in past conditionals). If I had gone to the beach, I would have gotten a tan. (it's an imaginary of something in the past).
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
One-Click Rewrite Settings [Spin Rewriter Tutorial]
 
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One-click rewrite settings Hi, This is Jason from SpinRewriter.com. In this short video I would like to tell you all about the "one-click rewrite" settings. The "one-click rewrite" option can be found in the second step. Spin Rewriter will automatically rewrite your article on "word level" which means it will automatically pick the most suitable synonyms for your original words and phrases. Once it's done, you will still be able to manually change the automatically selected synonyms. To make sure that your article meets your needs, you of course need to select the correct settings. When you click the "one-click rewrite" button, you will see the following settings. First, you need to choose between the low, medium and high risk settings. The medium risk settings are marked as recommended because they will work best for the widest range of scenarios. If you select the high risk settings, Spin Rewriter will use all synonyms that just might be correct. This way, every word will have a lot of synonyms, but the generated spun articles might not be 100% readable. That is why we recommend using the "high risk settings" only for generating content that will be used for your second and third tier link building. The low risk settings are used when you need to make sure Spin Rewriter will generate 100% readable articles. Spin Rewriter will only use the most suitable and time-tested synonyms for your words and phrases. This way, each word will have fewer synonyms, but the quality of the generated articles will be much higher than if you used the high risk settings. Content that's been spun with the "low risk settings" can be used on your money sites. It can also be used for guest blogging and for other first tier link building activities. The medium risk settings are marked as recommended because they are a good compromise between the low risk and the high risk settings. When you pick the medium risk settings, only the synonyms that Spin Rewriter believes are correct will be used. Generated articles will be well readable and still very much unique. Content that's been spun with the "medium risk settings" is usually used for guest blogging and for other first tier link building activities. You can then check this box to enable nested spinning. This way, Spin Rewriter will find synonyms for single words inside spun phrases. Enabling this option will make your articles even more unique. If you want to protect some of your original words from being changed or spun, you can simply enter these words here. If you do this, our spinning algorithms won't touch them. You can also check this box if you want to automatically protect capitalized words from spinning. Once you are satisfied with your settings, simply click this button and Spin Rewriter will rewrite your article for you. When the spinning process is done, you can still manually change or add synonyms by double-clicking the original words. Thank you for watching our tutorial video. Visit www.SpinRewriter.com/tutorials to watch our other tutorial videos. Thanks and take care!
Views: 4922 SpinRewriter
LEARN HINDI STEP BY STEP 4- USE OF ARTICLE (A, An)
 
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http://anilmahato.com/learn-hindi-step-by-step-4-learn-introduction-in-hindi/. In this Hindi lesson you will learn to use articles (a, an) in Hindi sentences, which means one in amount. .................................................................. SUBSCRIBE MY HINDI LESSON ON YOUTUBE : http://goo.gl/CuN7j ................................................................... CIRCLE me on Google Plus : https://plus.google.com/+AnilMahato ................................................................... LIKE ON FACEBOOK : http://facebook.com/TheAnilMahato ................................................................... FOLLOW ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/TheAnilMahato ................................................................... FOLLOW me on Pinterest : http://pinterest.com/AnilMahato ................................................................... VISIT MY WEBSITE : http://www.anilmahato.com ................................................................... To submit your question http://anilmahato.com/submit-question/ .................................................................... To submit your exercise :http://anilmahato.com/2014/02/06/submit-your-daily-hindi-exercise/ .......................................................... Previous Hindi lessons on Introduction in Hindi : 1. How to say " I am____" 2. How to say "You are ____" 3. How to say " He/She is _____" Now, in this lesson we are learning one advance form. We will also use the articles -- a & an in above sentence. Before proceeding, I must suggest you, please master the concept above then only learn this tutorial. If you have master all above 3 structures of Hindi introduction, then let's start. Learn Hindi Step by Step 4 : Introduction in Hindi Learn Hindi Step by Step 4 : Introduction in Hindi Main Ek Ladka Hoon. ( I am a boy.) मैं एक लड़का हूँ | Main Ek Ladki Hoon. ( I am a girl). मैं एक लड़की हूँ | Tum Ek Ladka/Ladke Ho. ( You are a boy) तुम एक लड़का /लड़के हो | Tum Ek Ladki Ho. ( You are a girl) तुम एक लड़की हो | Vo Ek Ladka Hai. ( He is a boy) वो एक लड़का है | Vo Ek Ladki Hai. ( She is a girl) वो एक लड़की है | Main Ek Vidyarthi Hoon. ( I am a student) मैं एक विद्यार्थी हूँ | Tum Ek Vidhyarthi Ho. ( You are a student) Vo Ek Vidhyarthi Hai. ( He/She is a student). New Hindi Words to Learn & Remember: Ek -- One, A, An Ladka -- Boy Ladki -- Girl Vidhyarthi (विद्यार्थी) -- Student , Other similar words for student : Male Student = Chhatra (छात्र) Female Student = Chhatraa (छात्रा) Sentence Structure to Learn & Remember : Main Ek ______ Hoon. (I am a/an ____) मैं एक ________ हूँ | Tum Ek ______ Ho. ( You are a/an ____) तुम एक ______ हो | Vo ek ______ Hai. He/She is an/an ____ वो एक ______ है | In the blank space you can use any proper noun or adjectives to complete the sentence. And, if you understand how to insert a & an in the sentence then its time to do some practice. Make the Hindi sentences in the comment section below using article ek , I will check and correct them if I find any mistake. Exercise 1. : Translate the following English sentences in Hindi. 1. I am a student. 2. You are a doctor 3. He is an engineer 4. I am a bus driver. 5. I am a writer. 6. You are an engineer. 7. You are a nurse. 8. She is an book seller. 9. I am a nurse. 10. You are a professor. 11. I am an actor. 12. You are a farmer. Exercise 2 : Transform the above sentences of exercise 1 into other sentences changing the subject to He , She, You & I for both masculine and feminine if applicable. For example: 1. I am a writer = Main Ek Lekhak Hoon (M) 2. I am a writer = Main ek Lekhika Hoon (F) 3. You are a writer = Tum ek Lekhak Ho ( M) 4. You are a writer = Tum Ek Lekhika Ho ( F) 5. He is a writer = Vo Ek Lekhak Hai. (M) 6. She is a writer = Vo ek Lekhika Hai. (F)
Views: 6202 Anil Mahato
Vocabulary Words English Learn With Meaning in Hindi
 
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In this video (Vocabulary Words English Learn With Meaning in Hindi | Daily Use English Words & Sentences ), I've covered important daily use English words with meaning and examples. Having a good vocabulary is vital for effective communication. नये Subscribers के लिए Basic से शुरू Lecture 1, 2, 3.... https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5eX6gADDo5ZHykXBaXYpVO Competitive English Grammar Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JLN-ZOtivNwide92ToFZx Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/englishwaledotcom/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spoken_english_guru_adityarana/ FREE Android App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.qtime.spokenenglishguru Spoken English Book & Daily Use Sentences' Book: http://bit.ly/2Oj7zUF All Video Lectures’ Lesson-wise Pen Drive - http://bit.ly/2wlxv6N Free PDF eBook: http://bit.ly/2LYwO8q FREE CHARTS: http://bit.ly/2LVtbAd FREE Practice Ex: http://bit.ly/2Mz4XRI Complete English Speaking Course Lesson-wise Videos (250+ Videos) Link: Lesson 1: English सीखने की शुरूआत https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xW_8t2mMZStWZFEdKdvAc Lesson 2: Parts of Speech https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Lesson 3: Simple Sentences - Present, Past & Future https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Lesson 4: सभी 12 Tenses सीखो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Lesson 5: Modal Helping Verbs in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Lesson 6: All Prepositions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Lesson 7: All Conjunctions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Lesson 8: Daily Use English Sentences https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Lesson 9: Vocabulary Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7Ny0kgrgXfoltFX8zxMr10 Lesson 10: Daily English Speaking Practice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5RSgM5wsAbCbTMXi9AAJFh Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4myjPpnomQnvU37GUbXE2s Lesson 11: Hindi to English Translation & Tricks https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6n6xk9pPe1xUc3VhAB6Ra0 Lesson 13: Active and Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Lesson 14: Be Being Been | Concept & Use https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Lesson 15: Advance Grammar & Spoken Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Lesson 16: Gerund, Infinitives and Participles https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5DdSQoWpx85VqxzMr8Rbkf Lesson 17: Phrasal Verbs in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4N0emQQe7ZjjzwbcB9jRdQ Lesson 18: English Practice Exercises & Test Papers https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Lesson 19: English के Doubts Clear करो https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7gZn51MoIEMOvLd36mzdKl Lesson 20: English Conversations https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh Lesson 21: English Speaking with Kids https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JDlK6GUD3KkyqzbdGZSXm Lesson 22: Listening Practice Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5b-qNJZTsRYqUqGmOsb9N1 Lesson 23: Pronunciation & Sound Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Lesson 24: Do you know? इंग्लिश की छोटी-2 बातें https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Lesson 25: Subject Verb Agreement for Competitive Exams https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6lS-vakv_E76Ill-AUH-g9 Lesson 26: Interviews Questions & Tips https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AzcTWgqWpQpRkOeQuuSMd Lesson 27: Letter Writing in English https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5FG7i2wA5bMxcTr7OxnGyi #vocabularywordsenglishlearnwithmeaninginhindi
Views: 161998 Spoken English Guru
use of wish in english|काश का इंग्लिश में use|special uses in english
 
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Please watch: "[Hindi]use of almost in english|almost in english|meaning and use of almost" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaxQiRegtlE --~-- Follow me on facebook go to my page: LINK: https://www.facebook.com/Mattys-English-365673703862174/ =========================================================== Follow me on Instagram: LINK: https://www.instagram.com/madhav_matty/?hl=en =========================================================== How to learn conjunction with best Trick: LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccGDJhb7Fvk =========================================================== How did I learnt English: LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZyXCkkZubk&t=16s =========================================================== How to learn vocabulary: LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5dOJ93ukWE&t=11s....vocabulary =========================================================== For more videos my Youtube channel link: LINK: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC49CZev488Pt7oWKV_QaMoQ?view_as=subscriber......channel ================================================================================== ********************BEST OF LUCK******************
Views: 69000 Matty English
APA Style 6th Ed.: In-Text Citations, Quotations, and Plagiarism
 
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This video will show you how to set up your paper following correct APA Style guidelines in Microsoft Word 2010 for PC. This specific video focuses on using parenthetical and in-text citations, quotations, and how to properly credit authors to avoid plagiarism. The steps should be very similar on every version of Word since 2007 for PC. On Word for Mac, I believe the steps are the same, but the interface is different. For how to make a Title Page and Running Head: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKWKswH29kM For how to make a Reference List: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Yv--VVS9Zw For more information about APA Style, pick up the latest version of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, or browse through the resources at the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/
Views: 361672 Samuel Forlenza
Annotating Text
 
07:08
Views: 228504 Katie Cranfill

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