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Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2335499 Khan Academy
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1782102 CrashCourse
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1433441 It's AumSum Time
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 42712 Socratica
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 284281 Professor Dave Explains
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1072841 Tyler DeWitt
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 45878 Socratica
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
Types of Bond: Ionic, Covalent, Coordinate, and Hydrogen Bonds
 
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Types of Bond in chemistry are explained in this video. The explanation of chemical bonding and different types of chemical bonds that are explained in this video include ionic bonds, covalent bonds, coordinate bonds, and hydrogen bonds. Ionic Bond: Ionic bonding is seen when two atoms form a bond by donating or accepting electrons. In this type of chemical bonding, there is an electrostatic attraction between the ions which are oppositely charged. Covalent Bond: In covalent bonding, two atoms share electrons to be able to attain the configuration of their nearest noble gas. It is also called a molecular bond and is characterized by electrons sharing between atoms. Coordinate bond: In the case of coordinate bonding, both the electrons that form the bond come from the same atom. Coordinate bond is also known as a coordinate covalent bond or a dative covalent bond. Hydrogen Bond: Hydrogen bonding is a type of electrostatic attraction and is seen when a hydrogen atom which is bonded to a highly electronegative atom (like Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine) comes close to another adjacent atom having a lone pair of electrons. Get more information about the types of bond here- https://byjus.com/chemistry/ionic-covalent-and-coordinate-bond/ Thank you for watching. If you liked this video, please subscribe to our channel and press the like button. Click on the bell icon to turn on notifications and you will never miss out on our latest videos! Explore more content like this on our channel. Still have a doubt about this topic? Or Have an idea/ suggestion for a new video? Please comment below.
Views: 29330 BYJU'S
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2477463 CrashCourse
What are metallic bonds? | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about particles in a metal, that are held together by metallic bonds.What are metallic bonds? Find out more in this video! This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool
Ionic Bond | #aumsum
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1215592 It's AumSum Time
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1527636 CrashCourse
Properties of Water
 
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Explore some properties of water with the Amoeba Sisters! It's all about those hydrogen bonds. Video has handout: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts Terms discussed include adhesion, cohesion, surface tension, specific heat - all made possible by those amazing hydrogen bonds. Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology *We mention that water makes up "3/4 of the Earth's surface" and we wish we had said "nearly" This number is going to be an estimate, but here is a source that puts it around 71%. https://water.usgs.gov/edu/earthhowmuch.html We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 769706 Amoeba Sisters
Valence electrons and bonding | Periodic table | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to get Lewis structures from electron configuration, and how valence electrons are involved in forming bonds. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/atomic-radius-trend?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/copy-of-periodic-table-of-elements/v/periodic-table-transition-metals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 472931 Khan Academy
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 100525 Whats Up Dude
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 628841 Bozeman Science
Ionic Bond in Hindi - Definition, Examples and Properties (Chemical Bonding)
 
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Hi, guys. I made this video as my entry into the 'Khan Academy India Talent Search'. If you are a teacher and would like to take part in it, here are the details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vP19zUIo4Q In this video, I discuss the ionic bond and its characteristics. The language is Hindi mixed with English.
Views: 66892 Busting JEE Main
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 267545 RicochetScience
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
08:52
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 733236 Tyler DeWitt
Electronegativity and bonding | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
11:39
Electronegativity differences in bonding using Pauling scale. Using differences in electronegativity to classify bonds as covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
GCSE Science Chemistry (9-1) Metals and Alloys
 
03:57
Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at the properties of metals and of alloys. We then explain these properties by linking them to the structures. Image credits: Gold ingot (By Swiss Banker [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons) Bronze guitar string (By Badagnani (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)
Views: 119882 Freesciencelessons
The CHEMICAL BONDS Song  - NOW WITH CLOSED CAPTION SO YOU CAN SING ALONG!  Mr. Edmonds  -
 
03:33
This song is about the formation of the two types of chemical bonds: IONIC BONDS and COVALENT BONDS. The tune is to "Dancing Queen" by Abba (the song from their album, Arrival). After looking for several song melodies, this one fit the words the best. Many thanks to my current and former science students for their encouragement! Document with words is in "Docs" section for dsecms on Teachertube, OR BELOW: The Chemical Bonds Song -- to the tune of "Dancing Queen" by Abba from the album Arrival. Words by Doug Edmonds. Oooh yeah, Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Watch you'll see! First we'll start with ionic bonds, A metal and nonmetal are involved. The metal gives over electrons, the nonmetal ... it receives. The atoms become IONS! Metals might have 1,2 or 3 Electrons for the nonmetal to receive It all depends on what's needed, to make the number 8 For the nonmetals' outer shell. AND IF IT HAPPENS FOR THEM ... They both become IONS ...... CHARGED ATOMS .... They become IONS! The metal's positive, the nonmetal's negative, They become IONS, oh yeah. The metal's plus, the nonmetal minus, and opposites they do attract. So what you get, when they come together, is an IONIC BOND. So what about those covalent bonds? It's not about loss and gain of electrons. Valence electrons they are shared, to complete the outer shells Of the nonmetals set to bond. IT'S WHEN NONMETALS JOIN ... to make covalent bonds With shared electrons ,,,, they're covalent bonds. Not a transfer, instead they share valence electrons, oh yeah! Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Play the song again ! Ionic bonds, covalent bonds ..... both chemical bonds!
Views: 215210 dsecms
Chemical Bonding part 3 Ionic Compounds and their Physical Properties
 
04:45
In this tutorial, ionic compounds and their general physical properties are discussed. Specifically, questions such as how ions are arranged in an ionic compound are addressed along with the definition of an electrolyte. Two different PhET simulations are used to demonstrate these properties. A number of different physical properties are discussed such as the common high melting and boiling points of these compounds and their brittle nature. Solubility and Conductivity of ionic compounds in different physical states are addressed.
Views: 126 Sarah English
What are Ionic Bonds?  | The Chemistry Journey | FuseSchool
 
02:55
In this video you'll learn the basics about Ionic Bonds. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! The Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
17:51
This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 148820 AtomicSchool
Metallic nature | Chemical bonds  | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
09:28
Properties of metals and how we can explain their properties using electron "sea" model. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/covalent-networks-metallic-and-ionic-crystals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-and-chemical-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 144802 Khan Academy
Minerals and Chemical Bonds
 
09:01
Chemical bonds and their influence on the diagnostic characteristics of minerals
Views: 417 joanna hodge
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
07:21
Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 140086 AtomicSchool
Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
 
28:30
Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
Views: 1959690 CBSE Udaan XI
Ionic Bond
 
06:34
DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 70812 DeltaStep
Covalent Nature of Ionic Bonds -Fajan's Rules  - Chemical Bonding And Molecular Structure (Part 11)
 
27:21
Need help in Chemistry? Are you in 11th or 12th grade? Then you shall find these videos useful. Barring 10 videos on "IUPAC Nomenclature" and 8 videos on "Comparing acid base strengths of organic acids", which I made as they were requested by students. I have uploaded videos following the chapters of the NCERT Text book for Class 11 to be followed by class 12. I am making the videos in sequence so You can play the videos from the beginning to do the entire course. I hope you work with your teachers and me and 'kill it' in the final exams - Boards in India or Regents in the USA.. Wishing you all the best!! HAPPY STUDYING!! If you have questions regarding the video, please do write in the comments. I will get back to you as soon as possible.
Views: 5828 Seema Dhawan Arora
Covalent networks, metallic crystals, and ionic crystals | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
09:14
Covalent networks, metallic crystals, and ionic crystals: Some of the strongest molecular structures. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/copy-of-dot-structures/v/drawing-dot-structures?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 285915 Khan Academy
Naming Ionic and Molecular Compounds | How to Pass Chemistry
 
12:42
Naming compounds have never been so simple! With my strategy and step by step examples, you will be naming compounds like a pro in no time! This video explains every single type of ionic compound rule and covalent compound rule you will see and there are even practice problems to lock in what you just learned. 📗 FREE CHEMISTRY SURVIVAL GUIDE https://melissa.help/freechemguide 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️GOT A QUESTION? ASK ME HERE https://melissa.help/me 👉 SHOP MY STEP-BY-STEP CHEMISTRY NOTES👈 https://melissamaribel.com/ -Thermochemistry Notes https://melissa.help/thermonotes -Acids and Bases Notes https://melissa.help/acidbase1notes -Naming Compounds and Acids Notes https://melissa.help/namingnotes -Dimensional Analysis, Significant Figures, and Density Notes https://melissa.help/sigfignotes -Gas Laws Notes https://melissa.help/gaslawsnotes -Stoichiometry Notes https://melissa.help/stoichnotes -Redox Reactions Notes https://melissa.help/redoxnotes -Molarity Notes https://melissa.help/molaritynotes -Limiting Reactants Notes https://melissa.help/limreactnotes -Lewis Structures Notes https://melissa.help/lewisnotes -Kinetics Notes https://melissa.help/kineticsnotes 🧡SHOW YOUR SUPPORT ON PATREON https://www.patreon.com/melissamaribel 👍MELISSA'S FAVORITES ON AMAZON https://www.amazon.com/shop/chemistrywithmelissamaribel --OTHER RESOURCES TO HELP YOU GET THROUGH SCHOOL-- 🙌 This was my go-to homework help when I was in school. Chegg Study is one of my favorites. https://che.gg/melissamaribelstudy 📚 I made the mistake of buying all of my textbooks, I wish I had the option of renting them. Thankfully you do, with Chegg Textbook Rentals. https://che.gg/melissamaribelrentals 💰 If you bought a textbook and don’t want the hassle of selling it, Chegg can do the work for you, with Chegg Buyback. https://che.gg/melissamaribelbuyback 📝 QUICKSTUDY REFERENCE GUIDES ⬇️ 📕 CHEMISTRY BREAKDOWN AND REVIEW https://amzn.to/2t50xWx 📙 CHEMISTRY EQUATIONS AND ANSWERS https://amzn.to/2MPjC88 📘 CHEMISTRY TERMINOLOGY https://amzn.to/2t9cv1o DISCLAIMER: Some links in the description are affiliate links, which means that if you buy from those links, I’ll receive a small commission. This helps support the channel and allows me to continue making videos like this. Thanks for the support! 💁‍♀️ HI I'M MELISSA MARIBEL I help students pass Chemistry. I used to struggle with this subject, so when I finally graduated with a bachelor's degree in Chemistry, I became a tutor so that you wouldn't have to struggle like I did. I know that with the right help, YOU CAN LEARN ANYTHING! 👋 FOLLOW ME Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellomelissam/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hellomelissam/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hellomelissam Practice problems with step by step answers: http://bit.ly/2YGSkX5 TIMESTAMPS 1:13 Naming Strategy 1:53 Ionic Compound Naming Rules 9:49 Covalent Compound Naming Rules Example 11:49 Practice problems ___________________________________________________________________ Music: [China Electro] China-P (Morocco No Copyright music) - https://youtu.be/uDkddvltoUk Music: The Rover - S Strong https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI ___________________________________________________________________
Views: 346888 Melissa Maribel
Chemical Bonding
 
06:49
Chemical Bonding Though the periodic table has only 118 or so elements, there are obviously more substances in nature than 118 pure elements. This is because atoms can react with one another to form new substances called compounds (see our Chemical Reactions module). Formed when two or more atoms chemically bond together, the resulting compound is unique both chemically and physically from its parent atoms. Let's look at an example. The element sodium is a silver-colored metal that reacts so violently with water that flames are produced when sodium gets wet. The element chlorine is a greenish-colored gas that is so poisonous that it was used as a weapon in World War I. When chemically bonded together, these two dangerous substances form the compound sodium chloride, a compound so safe that we eat it every day - common table salt! In ionic bonding, electrons are completely transferred from one atom to another. In the process of either losing or gaining negatively charged electrons, the reacting atoms form ions. The oppositely charged ions are attracted to each other by electrostatic forces, which are the basis of the ionic bond. Notice that when sodium loses its one valence electron it gets smaller in size, while chlorine grows larger when it gains an additional valence electron. This is typical of the relative sizes of ions to atoms. Positive ions tend to be smaller than their parent atoms while negative ions tend to be larger than their parent. After the reaction takes place, the charged Na+ and Cl- ions are held together by electrostatic forces, thus forming an ionic bond. Ionic compounds share many features in common: •Ionic bonds form between metals and nonmetals. •In naming simple ionic compounds, the metal is always first, the nonmetal second (e.g., sodium chloride). •Ionic compounds dissolve easily in water and other polar solvents. •In solution, ionic compounds easily conduct electricity. •Ionic compounds tend to form crystalline solids with high melting temperatures. Checkout for more information: https://chemistry.tutorvista.com/physical-chemistry/chemical-bonding.html Follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tutorvista https://twitter.com/TutorVista
Views: 13377 TutorVista
Hydrogen bonding in water | Water, acids, and bases | Biology | Khan Academy
 
06:47
Reactants and products in reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/hydrogen-bonding-in-water/v/hydrogen-bonding-in-water?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 264726 Khan Academy
Properties of simple covalent substances
 
03:52
This video discusses the properties of simple covalent substances (such as melting & boiling points and electrical conductivity) and explains these properties by relating them to their bonding & structure.
Chemical Bonds
 
05:34
Chemical Bonding A chemical bond results from strong electrostatic interactions between two atoms. The nature of the atoms determines the kind of bond. COVALENT bonds result from a strong interaction between NEUTRAL atoms Each atom donates an electron resulting in a pair of electrons that are SHARED between the two atoms For example, consider a hydrogen molecule, H2.When the two hydrogen, H, atoms are far apart from each other they do not feel any interaction. As they come closer each “feels” the presence of the other. The electron on each H atom occupies a volume that covers both H atoms and a COVALENT bond is formed. Once the bond has been formed, the two electrons are shared by BOTH H atoms. An electron density plot for the H2 molecule shows that the shared electrons occupy a volume equally distributed over BOTH H atoms. Potential energy (kJ/mol) Separation (Å) It is also possible that, as two atoms come closer, one electron is transferred to the other atom. The atom that gives up an electron acquires a +1 charge and the other atom, which accepts the electron acquires a –1 charge. The two atoms are attracted to each other through Coulombic interactions – opposite charges attract – resulting in an IONIC bond. Animation Potential energy (kJ/mol) Separation (Å) What factors determine if an atom forms a covalent or ionic bond with another atom? The number of electrons in an atom, particularly the number of the electrons furthest away from the nucleus determines the atom’s reactivity and hence its tendency to form covalent or ionic bonds. These outermost electrons are the one’s that are more likely to “feel” the presence of other atoms and hence the one’s involved in bonding i.e. in reactions. Chemistry of an element depends almost entirely on the number of electrons, and hence its atomic number. The periodic table By the late 1800’s it was realized that elements could be grouped by similar chemical properties and that the chemical and physical properties of elements are periodic functions of their atomic numbers – PERIODIC LAW. The arrangements of the elements in order of increasing atomic number, with elements having similar properties placed in a vertical column, is called the PERIODIC TABLE. Columns are called GROUPS (FAMILIES) and rows are called PERIODS. Elements in a group have similar chemical and physical properties. The total number of electrons within a group is different, increasing in number down a group However, the number of electrons furthest away from the nucleus, called the OUTER or VALENCE electrons is the same for all elements in a group. Groups are referred to by names, which often derive from their properties I – Alkali metals; II – Alkaline Earth metals VII – Halogens; VIII – Noble gases The elements in the middle block are called TRANSITION ELEMENTS Elements in the A group are diverse; metals and non-metals, solids and gases at room temperature. The transition elements are all metals, and are solids at room temp, except for Hg. Among the transition elements are two sets of 14 elements - the LANTHANIDES and the ACTINIDES Physical and Chemical properties such as melting points, thermal and electrical conductivity, atomic size, vary systematically across the periodic table. Elements within a column have similar properties Atomic radius (Å) A “zig-zag” division of the table divides metals from non-metals. Elements to the left of the zig-zag line are metals (except for hydrogen, which is unique) and to the right are non-metals. Elements along the border have intermediate properties and are called metalloids.
Views: 153 SliderBase
Ionic and metallic bonding- structure and  properties
 
06:32
I've made this set of videos to use with my classes alongside teaching them. They're studying for A Level Chemistry (OCR). Do let me know if I've made any mistakes. I might have used fairly un-scientific language at times to try and get points across. I use powerpoints that I've been using in lessons, with resources that have been built up over the years (via colleagues, TES etc). I've lost track of where some of it's come from. So if there's something here you think needs an acknowledgement (or even to be removed), I apologise! Please let me know, and I'll do so.
Views: 1247 DrKChem
Ionic VS Covalent Bonds: Rap Battle!
 
01:58
Hi! I'm Anesha and this is my channel, Likeable Science. As the name probably tells you, the purpose of my videos is to make science likeable! Using humor, visual learning, time-lapse, raps, and songs, Likeable Science videos are based on a middle/high school curriculum, and help you to learn quickly in a fun and interesting way! If you like science, check out Likeable STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) at our website: https://www.likeableSTEM.com Likeable STEM includes this channel and others like Likeable Computing to teach all about computer science. Visit the Likeable STEM website for volunteering opportunities, chances to write in our blog, and for more learning opportunities! You better brace yourself for Likeable Science's first rap battle: ionic VS covalent bonds! This rap battle will give you all the information you need to distinguish the differences between ionic and covalent bonds. Enjoy!
Views: 1681 Likeable Science
4 Ionic Structure and Properties
 
06:44
4th in a series of films exploring the structure and bonding of the different types of material covered in chemistry. Here we look at how the bonding of ionic substances can be used to explain their properties.
Views: 2650 WACE Chem
Covalent bonds and the properties of water
 
06:42
This video is about Covalent bonds and properties of water.
Views: 442 Jarrett Arnold
√√ Covalent Network Substances | Bonding and Classification | Chemical Earth | Chemistry
 
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https://www.iitutor.com Covalent network substances (covalent lattice) Covalent network substances or covalent lattices include elements such as carbon and silicon, and compounds such as silicon dioxide and silicon carbide. The key to their properties lies in the three-dimensional network of strong covalent bonds between the atoms which hold the lattice together. Covalent network substances have the following characteristic properties. ● Very high melting and boiling points ● Non-conductors of electricity in the solid and liquid states ● Extremely hard and brittle ● Chemically inert ● Insoluble in water and most other solvents. The high melting and boiling points and the extreme hardness of covalent network substances suggest that the atoms in these solids are joined by very strong covalent bonds. These strong covalent bonds produce rigid three-dimensional network structures. The non-conductivity of covalent molecular sub-stances is due to the lack of mobile charged species in the solid and liquid states. There are no delocalised electrons nor charged ions capable of conducting an electric current. Graphite is an exception to this, in that its covalent bonds are confined to two-dimensional parallel planes. Delocalised electrons in these planes explain the electrical conductivity of graphite. Weak intermolecular forces between these planes hold the structure together and explain why graphite power is used as a dry lubricant.
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Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
4   Non covalent bonds
 
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Views: 6546 BioTechGuru
What are Intermolecular Forces? || Chemical Bonds || Chemistry
 
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Chemistry students often confuse Intermolecular Forces and Intramolecular Forces. What are Intermolecular Forces? These are the electrostatic attractions that draw different chemical species together. There are two main kinds of intermolecular forces: dipole interactions and dispersion forces. In this video, we'll do a survey of the various kinds of intermolecular bonds, collectively known as "van der Waals Interactions." "INTER-" refers to the forces between two different chemical species. "INTRA-" refers to the forces within a SINGLE chemical molecule or compound that holds it together. We have separate videos about intramolecular bonds, like ionic bonds and covalent bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:00 Overview of Intermolecular Forces/ van der Waals 0:35 Types of Dipole Interactions 0:41 Ion-Dipole Forces - Ions attracted to a polar molecule 1:24 Ion-induced Dipole Interactions 2:25 Dipole-Dipole Forces - Two polar molecules attracted to each other 3:06 Hydrogen Bonds - Special case of Dipole Dipole interaction 4:32 Dispersion Forces 6:39 Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces This video was made possible with the help of our Patrons on Patreon! We would especially like to recognize the generosity of our VIP Patron, Tracy Karin Prell. We are able to do so much more science communication thanks to Tracy! We are thrilled she is on our team. ///////////////////////// Related videos about chemical bonds: Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/2d4RZ7i Ionic vs Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios.
Views: 12553 Socratica