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How to Calculate ROI (Return on Investment)
 
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Watch more How to Start a Business videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/437106-How-to-Calculate-ROI-Return-on-Investment Return on investment, or ROI, is the overall profit made on an investment expressed as a percentage of the amount invested -- one of the most important gauges of business success. Learn how to figure out your ROI. Step 1: Determine net profit Determine the company's net profit, also known as net earnings. Tip Make sure not to confuse net profit with gross revenue. Step 2: Calculate total investment Calculate the total investment, which can be found by adding total debt to total equity. Step 3: Multiply by 100 Divide the net profit by the total investment and multiply by 100 to find the basic return on investment. If the net profit is $100,000 and the total invested is $300,000, then the return on investment would be 33 percent. Step 4: Compute stock ROI Compute the return on stock investments with a variation of the basic formula. Step 5: Find the value Imagine you invest $5,000 in a company. One year later, the stock's value has risen to $5,200 and you earn $100 in dividends. Use the new formula to calculate your ROI at 6 percent. Did You Know? In 1919, the DuPont company developed their own ROI formula, known as the DuPont Formula.
Views: 36179 Howcast
16. [Lean Manufacturing] How To Calculate Net Profit And Return on Investment.
 
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For further information go to: http://www.themanufacturingmentor.com | The simple way to understand your numbers! I provide Executive Coaching, Lean Manufacturing Consulting, and Lean Manufacturing Training
Views: 10722 ManufacturingMentor
How to Calculate NPV, IRR & ROI in Excel || Net Present Value  || Internal Rate of Return
 
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http://alphabench.com/data/excel-npv-irr-tutorial.html Tutorial demonstrating how to calculate NPV, IRR, and ROI for an investment. Demonstrates manual calculation of present values as well as the use of NPV and IRR functions in Excel. The spreadsheet used can be downloaded at: http://alphabench.com/data/NPV-IRR_STR.xlsx Capital Budgeting includes the analysis of various projects with financial measurements such as Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and Return on Investment (ROI). This video discusses all of these concepts briefly while demonstrating the calculation of them using Excel. Excel Functions: NPV IRR
Views: 42829 Matt Macarty
How to Calculate ROI on a Real Estate Investment
 
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Return on investment, or ROI, is the single most important metric to consider when it comes to purchasing rental real estate. ROI is used to evaluate the performance of an investment. This metric determines how profitable your investment will be. If you’re assessing a real estate investment, ROI is critical. It is the entire reason for investing in real estate! You need to know how to use a simple and conservative formula in order to thoroughly analyze the return on a rental property. In this video, I’ll show you a simple and straightforward way to calculate ROI. You’ll learn about the cash-on-cash formula, and the importance of being conservative in your estimate. We'll talk about cash flow, expenses, and more! How to Evaluate Debt Service on a Rental Property: https://goo.gl/CNzxFq BOOK A FREE CALL WITH OUR TEAM TODAY AT MORRIS INVEST: https://goo.gl/DNIIh0 CHECK OUT OUR OTHER GREAT VIDEO PLAYLISTS LIKE: VIDEOS ABOUT TURNKEY REAL ESTATE INVESTING: https://goo.gl/1bGEhB OR VIDEOS ABOUT GETTING STARTED IN REAL ESTATE https://goo.gl/dPfWeY OR VIDEOS ABOUT REAL ESTATE NEWS https://goo.gl/m1b3U8 SUBSCRIBE AND JOIN OUR AWESOME COMMUNITY: https://goo.gl/Polf6I LISTEN TO THE PODCAST: iTunes: https://goo.gl/vM969n FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/claytonmorris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MorrisInvest Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/claytonmorris
Views: 98325 Morris Invest
Investopedia Video: How To Calculate Return On Investment (ROI)
 
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Be the first to check out our latest videos on Investopedia Video: http://www.investopedia.com/video/ Return on investment allows an investor to evaluate the performance of an investment and compare it to others in his or her portfolio. Find out how to calculate ROI and how to use to your advantage. For more on different ROI ratios, and how to use them -- check out; FYI On ROI: A Guide To Calculating Return On Investment http://www.investopedia.com/articles/basics/10/guide-to-calculating-roi.asp How To Calculate ROI For Real Estate Investments http://www.investopedia.com/articles/basics/11/calculate-roi-real-estate-investments.asp Find Quality Investments With ROIC http://www.investopedia.com/articles/fundamental/03/050603.asp CFA Level 1 Exam Prep: Financial Ratios - Return On Investment Ratios http://www.investopedia.com/exam-guide/cfa-level-1/financial-ratios/return-investment-ratios.asp
Views: 149862 Investopedia
Investment Appraisal - Calculating Net Present Value
 
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The basics of how to calculate present value and net present value are explained in this short revision video.
Views: 60610 tutor2u
How To Calculate The Numbers On A Rental Property | Net Yield And ROI | Real Estate Investing Tips
 
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How To Calculate The Numbers, Net Yield And ROI On A Rental Property | Real Estate Investing - A step by step guide to help you calculate the numbers on an investment property, so you can be sure that you are looking to buy a good investment. Links: http://www.monoperty.com/calculations http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/mortgages/mortgage-rate-calculator#results Share this video: https://youtu.be/gtqVOOzgIt0 Subscribe To My Channel to Get More Great Information http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Monoperty Andy Walker is the creator of monoperty.com, where he blogs online as a property investor and landlord, sharing what works, and what doesn't, to help you start or expand your property portfolio. Check out Andy's informative videos and tips and join the conversation. If you have any questions, please leave a comment in one of the videos or head over to monoperty.com/ask. How To Calculate The Numbers, Net Yield And ROI On A Rental Property | Real Estate Investing 0:00 The difference between an asset and a liability. 1:32 Gross yield 2:30 4 Figures you need to know 3:05 Annual rental income 3:24 Mortgage payment 4:43 Insurance 4:50 Property management company 5:10 Repairs 5:34 Voids 6:32 Net yield 7:08 Return on investment Other Videos To Watch: How To Find The Best Mortgage For Your Investment Property https://youtu.be/7S2OpFw0u-U A Guide To Researching Investment Properties https://youtu.be/8iULJRhNfvQ A Checklist For Viewing Investment Properties https://youtu.be/DTBSMSkih2U Other Great Resources: http://monoperty.com Connect With Me: http://www.facebook.com/monoperty https://twitter.com/monoperty https://www.linkedin.com/in/andywalker3 How To Calculate The Numbers, Net Yield And ROI On A Rental Property | Real Estate Investing
Views: 18278 Monoperty
Difference between Gross and Net Investment
 
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Gross investment spending is total investment on new capital inputs Net investment is gross investment adjusted for capital consumption (depreciation)
Views: 11937 tutor2u
How to Calculate the Net Operating Income (NOI) & Cap Rate for Real Estate Investments
 
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How to Calculate the Net Operating Income (NOI) & Cap Rate Link to the Answer Key (Try to do it yourself before looking!) - https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AvFYNI9VGM6TdDRaZ2ppamlKM1ItOHRxaWlraUdjM1E How to Calculate the Net Operating Income (NOI) & Cap Rate Connect with me on LinkedIn ("friend"): ​ http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=41316581&locale=en_­US&trk=tab_pro Check out my website: www.groundedcapital.com Subscribe to my Newsletter here: http://eepurl.com/x9dD1
Views: 45887 Marc Pfeiffer
How to calculate NPV and IRR (Net Present Value and Internal Rate Return) EXCEL
 
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HI Guys, This video will teach you how to calculate NPV (Net Present Value) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR) in Excel. Please go to our website www.i-hate-math.com for more tutorials. http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning !
Views: 324859 I Hate Math Group, Inc
3 ways to value a company - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Valuing a company is more art than science. Tim Bennett explains why and introduces three ways potential investors can get started. Related links… • How to value a company using discounted cash flow (DCF) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfcRUzKZZE8 • How to value a company using net assets - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV68zoBKTJE • What is a balance sheet? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuKEcxVplnY MoneyWeek videos are designed to help you become a better investor, and to give you a better understanding of the markets. They’re aimed at both beginners and more experienced investors. In all our videos we explain things in an easy-to-understand way. Some videos are about important ideas and concepts. Others are about investment stories and themes in the news. The emphasis is on clarity and brevity. We don’t want to waste your time with a 20-minute video that could easily be so much shorter.
Views: 249491 MoneyWeek
NPV and IRR in Excel 2010
 
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Description: How to calculate net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) in excel with a simple example. Download the excel file here: https://codible.myshopify.com/products/npv-and-irr-in-excel-2010-excel-files Some good books on Excel and Finance: Financial Modeling - by Benninga: http://amzn.to/2tByGQ2 Principles of Finance with Excel - by Benninga: http://amzn.to/2uaCyo6
Views: 848120 Codible
How to calculate investment NPV in Excel | lynda.com tutorial
 
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This Excel tutorial shows how to calculate the net present value (NPV) of an investment. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Excel-2010-tutorials/Financial-Functions-in-Depth/83199-2.html?utm_medium=viral&utm_source=youtube&utm_campaign=videoupload-83199-0304 This specific tutorial is just a single movie from chapter three of the Excel 2010: Financial Functions in Depth course presented by lynda.com author Curt Frye. The complete Excel 2010: Financial Functions in Depth course has a total duration of 2 hours and 20 minutes, and explores dozens of functions for evaluating cash flows, calculating depreciation, determining rates of return, and much more Excel 2010: Financial Functions in Depth table of contents: Introduction 1. Analyzing Loans, Payments, and Interest 2. Calculating Depreciation 3. Determining Values and Rates of Return 4. Calculating Bond Coupon Dates and Security Durations 5. Calculating Security Prices and Yields 6. Calculating Prices and Yields of Securities with Odd Periods Conclusion
Views: 119065 LinkedIn Learning
How to Calculate ROI (Return on Investment)
 
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This video shows how to calculate ROI. ROI, which stands for Return on Investment, is calculated by dividing income (profit) by the amount of capital invested. Thus, if a department of a large firm had income of $10 million and used $50 of capital, the ROI of the department would be 20%. ROI is a frequently used measure of profitability. If two divisions of a firm have a similar level of profit but one of the divisions uses a lot more capital to achieve the profit, the ROI will show that the division achieving the same profit with less capital is making better use of its resources. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 1262 Edspira
Net Investment Income and Tax on Net Investment Income for Private Foundations
 
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Net Investment Income and Tax on Net Investment Income for Private Foundations
Views: 243 Ed Kaplan
Net Present Value Explained in Five Minutes
 
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(1) Part 1 explains the concepts of net present value (2) Part 2 shows how to calculate NPV on Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional
Views: 349168 collegefinance
Net Present Value (NPV)
 
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This video explains the concept of Net Present Value and illustrates how to calculate the Net Present Value of a project via an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 511502 Edspira
IRR (Internal Rate of Return)
 
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This video explains the concept of IRR (the internal rate of return) and illustrates how to calculate the IRR via an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 622323 Edspira
Introduction to present value | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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A choice between money now and money later. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/present-value-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/time-value-of-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 757056 Khan Academy
How to Calculate ROI (Return On Investment) in Excel
 
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How to calculate ROI in Excel using formula. dollar return on investment excel spreadsheet, how to calculate roi in excel percentage Excel File: http://www.uploadkr.com/users/wajahat/ROI_20.xlsx If you have any question please feel free to ask. Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE Source: investopedia.com How to Calculate ROI ROI Calculation in Excel ROI Calculation - Made easy How to calculate Return on Investment roi calculation in excel how to calculate roi in excel how to calculate return on investment in excel calculating return on investment in excel how to calculate training roi in excel measure roi in excel
Views: 30187 InnoRative
How to value a company using net assets - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Following on from his "3 ways to value a company" video, Tim introduces the first method called the 'net assets approach'. Along the way he explains how it works, how it helps investors, and also points out some of its pitfalls.
Views: 101137 MoneyWeek
What Is the Net Investment Income Tax? And Why You Need to Care
 
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When President Obama signed the “Affordable Care Act”, aka Obamacare, it came with a pretty significant tax bite called the Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). From the IRS: “The NIIT applies at a rate of 3.8% to certain net investment income of individuals, estates and trusts that have income above the statutory threshold amounts.” Now, you may be thinking, “I don’t have anywhere near $250,000 in MAGI to worry about this tax. So, what’s the big deal?” But the IRS also states: “Taxpayers should be aware that these threshold amounts are not indexed for inflation”? Not indexed for inflation... Hmmmm..where have we heard that before? Oh yeah, the provisional income rules for the taxation of Social Security benefits as well as the Alternative Minimum Tax. When the legislation to tax Social Security and then the Alternative Minimum Tax were first enacted very few people were affected, thus no outrage, as only “the rich” paid. Now almost everyone pays some tax on their Social Security benefits. (As of the 2017 tax bill fewer taxpayers are caught in the AMT web, thankfully.) Pretty sneaky, eh? Oh, but it gets worse. How is Net Investment Income derived? Again, straight from the IRS website: What are some common types of income that are not Net Investment Income? Wages, unemployment compensation; operating income from a nonpassive business, Social Security Benefits, alimony, tax-exempt interest, self-employment income, Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends (see Rev. Rul. 90-56, 1990-2 CB 102) and distributions from certain Qualified Plans (those described in sections 401(a), 403(a), 403(b), 408, 408A or 457(b)). (emphasis mine) Here the IRS is telling us that distributions from retirement accounts are NOT subject to the NIIT, which is factually correct. What they don’t say is that distributions from retirement accounts are counted as income to determine if you need to pay the NIIT on your dividends, interest and capital gains. Some might even call this an error of omission. I certainly do. Let me give you an example of how this works. You are single. You have $180k income. You take a $50k IRA distribution. Your total income now is $230k. That $50k IRA distribution is not subject to NIIT. But if you have capital gains, interest and dividend income, those will be subject to the NIIT because that $50k IRA distribution put you above the $200k threshold! Large distributions from your qualified accounts could add 3.8% to your tax rate on dividends, interest and capital gains. That is nearly a 25% tax increase! Yeah, I get it. This tax won’t affect many people so it’s not a huge deal. Well, it’s not a big deal now but I assure you it will be because of inflation, just like taxes on Social Security. So, what do you do to avoid this??? Take a guess… Distributions from the Roth are not counted in your Adjusted Gross Income and thus will not ensnare you in NIIT trap. Once again, YAY for the ROTH! Is there anything it can’t do? ================================= If you like what you see, a thumbs up helps A LOT. It tells YouTube that people are engaged and so the Youtube algorithm will show the vide to others who may be interested in the content. So, give me a thumbs up, please! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE by clicking here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSEzy4i9xrKPoaU9z0_XbmA?sub_confirmation=1 Contact me: [email protected] GET MY BOOKS: Both are FREE to Kindle Unlimited Subscribers! The Tax Bomb In Your Retirement Accounts: How The Roth IRA Can Help You Avoid It https://amzn.to/2LHwQpt Strategic Money Planning: 8 Easy Ways To Put Your House In Order https://amzn.to/2wKGi50 GET ALL MY LATEST BLOGPOSTS: http://heritagewealthplanning.com/blog/ PODCAST: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/josh-scandlen-podcast/id1368065459?mt=2 http://heritagewealthplanning.com/category/podcasts/ LET'S SOCIALIZE! Facebook: http://Facebook.com/heritagewealthplanning Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshscandlen/ Quora: https://www.quora.com/profile/Josh-Scandlen Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/1/108893802372783791910
How To Work Out the RETURN ON INVESTMENT on Properties | Samuel Leeds
 
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To spend two days with me at the Property Investors Crash Course, claim your FREE ticket at: https://www.property-investors.co.uk A lot of property investors struggle to work out the return on investment when purchasing a property. In this video I explain exactly how to do calculate the ROI to ensure you're generating profit on the properties you buy. Share this video: https://youtu.be/P29R156tz78 Subscribe to this channel for more content: https://www.youtube.com/SamuelLeeds?sub_confirmation=1 How To Start Investing In Property: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD72LIRCoRw&list=PL2pwVLNuxBo-6LAqip-DiNmNpDlmfxx9A How To Buy Property Below Market Value: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsSE16fz7ws&index=3&list=PL2pwVLNuxBo9-mqWRERxqIkXpsXXnhzBP How To Buy A House with No Money Down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XoOaz1K1mo&index=3&list=PL2pwVLNuxBo8LdQHChi5Vdymq6oHgZz0t&t=0s How To Finance Property Deals: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DIStoRbaFE&list=PL2pwVLNuxBo9mQlt-GMmjUHPgm5GRtjZe FOLLOW ME on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/778613042238071 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leeds.samuel/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samuel-leeds-64660683 Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChZcrWJ6gl1ct2jYPnZ556Q
Views: 4215 Samuel Leeds
Calculating Numbers on a Rental Property [Using The Four Square Method!]
 
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Learn how to analyze a rental property with the unique "four square" method and make sure your next rental property investment is a cash cow! In this video from BiggerPockets.com, Brandon Turner (author of The Book on Rental Property Investing and co-host of the BiggerPockets Podcast) shares with you the step by step method for determining the monthly cash flow and cash on cash return for any rental property investment. Calculating the numbers on a rental property doesn't need to be difficult - and this video proves it.
Views: 1028744 BiggerPockets
Cash Flow from Investing (Statement of Cash Flows)
 
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This video shows how to calculate Cash Flow from Investing Activities for the Statement of Cash Flows. A comprehensive example is provided to illustrate how Cash Flow from Investing accounts for the net cash effects of the purchase or sale of fixed assets, the purchase of sale of securities, and the purchase or sale of other investments. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 50680 Edspira
NPV - Net Present Value, IRR - Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period.
 
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Project management topic on Capital budgeting techniques - NPV - Net Present Value, IRR - Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period, Profitability Index or Benefit Cost Ratio.
Views: 436337 pmtycoon
Return on Investment Calculation ROI
 
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http://www.ProfitableHospitality.com This calculator shows the 'payback' time and ROI for equipment and service investments. It takes into account the saving or profit increase expected and how long the equipment will last. Compare this to bank interest and new equipment can often be an excellent investment. Useful for justifying purchasing decisions! Examples shown for purchasing a new expresso machine, Point of Sale system and paying for a new Website. Just one of the hundreds of management and cost-control resources at http://www.ProfitableHospitality.com
Views: 36531 Profitable Hospitality
Financial investment tutorial: Understanding return on investment (ROI) | lynda.com
 
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Every investment is expected to deliver a return, but what does "return" mean exactly? Find out in this tutorial, which defines return on investment (ROI) and shows how to calculate ROI. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Business-Data-Analysis-tutorials/Financial-Literacy-Making-Investment-Decisions/145931-2.html?utm_campaign=JWYCs8rRHzg&utm_medium=viral&utm_source=youtube. This tutorial is a single movie from Making Investment Decisions by lynda.com author Rudolph Rosenberg. The complete course is 56 minutes and shows how to evaluate investments, assess risk, calculate a rate of return, and identify good professional and personal investment opportunities—no finance background required. Introduction 1. What Is an Investment? 2. The Net Present Value (NPV) Methodology 3. Application to Real-Life Situations Conclusion
Views: 23203 LinkedIn Learning
Real Estate Investing Terms Part 1 - NOI, Cap Rate & Cash on Cash - Real Estate Investment Tips
 
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For an experienced SF Bay Area real estate agent visit http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com Like me on Facebook: http://fb.com/iLiveInTheBayArea Thumbs up, favorite, share, subscribe and make a comment! One thing that's commonly asked of me from non-commercial agents and investors alike is what all the different terms mean. Net Operating income (NOI), Cap rate, Cash on Cash, Internal Rate of Return (or IRR) and Net Present Value, or NPV. Knowing these terms and how to calculate them is essential to anyone who invests in real estate. This is especially true for new investors. If you're learning or if you're a bit unfamiliar with where to start, be sure to watch me "How to Start Investing" video. I'm going to explain each one of these the same way I explain it to my clients in my two part video. In this video we'll discuss Net Operating Income, Cap Rate and cash on cash. In my "Investing Terms Part 2" video we'll tie in the internal rate of return and net present value. To start off, let's take a look at a make believe commercial investment property. Here we have a property listed at about $2M. To keep numbers simple, let's say after all expenses, but NOT including the mortgage principle and interest, it nets $150k/year. Now this $150k is called the "Net operating income". Net Operating income, or NOI for short, is what you make after accounting for taxes, insurance, vacancy & credit loss, repairs, management (if any), utilities and other miscellaneous costs. Again, this is NOT including a mortgage principle and interest. Now we simply plug it into a formula that I always remember as "IRV". Income over Rate equals Value Income is the NOI we just discussed, which in this case is $150k/year, rate is the Cap Rate, and Value is the price of the property. Now this formula can go multiple ways just like a simple math. If we plug in our Income and our value, but don't know our rate, we simply solve it by dividing by Value Going back to our example, we know our Income, we know we need to divide it by our value and then solve our cap rate. $150,000 divided by $2m is .075, or 7.5% - which is our cap rate. Now, a lot of people get so stuck on the cap rate, they forget that it's not the best way to analyze a property's potential. When you think of a cap rate, think of a photograph or a snapshot. A cap rate is simply a quick snapshot of a property for just ONE YEAR as it stands and WITHOUT any financing. Since I've explained what NOI is and how to find the Cap Rate lets figure out how we determine Cash on Cash. Pretend you don't have the full $2M to buy the property cash, or presume you want to use leverage as discussed in my "Using Leverage Properly" video and instead plan on putting a 35% down payment and getting a loan for the rest. Well, a cap rate is really no longer going to give you an accurate depiction of how much money you're making now is it? Remember, you're not putting $2M in the bank anymore; you're talking about only putting $700k into the bank and obviously you're not going to make $150k/year because now you have a loan to pay for! First, I've listed the potential loan here. It's a 65% loan to value amount, meaning you put down 35% they'll give you 65%. The interest rate is 5.5%, amortized over 30 years. This will give us an Annual Debt Service of $88,575. Annual Debt service is really just a fancy way of saying Mortgage Principle and Interest. We now have $700k invested as our down payment, and that $150k/year is now down to $61,425 after paying the debt service. Solving for cash on cash is a very similar formula as the IRV Cap rate formula. Take the income per year, which is now $61,425 and divide that by the initial investment of $700k which will equal .08775, or 8.775%. We're going to use this same example in my "Investing Terms Part 2" video, so be sure to watch that one next time you have a few minutes. In the meantime, be sure next time you analyze a property you take into account what kind of return it could make with and without leverage. Sometimes it could make all the difference. Sometimes it might convince you that it's just better off to pay cash for the property you're looking at. Regardless of which it is, feel confident knowing you can calculate the difference between both scenarios using the NOI and make an informed decision...now that's good to know. Contact Davide Pio Today | SF Bay Area Real Estate http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com | 510-815-2000
How to find the Expected Return and Risk
 
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Hi Guys, This video will show you how to find the expected return and risk of a single portfolio. This example will show you the higher the risk the higher the return. Please watch more videos at www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning !
Views: 195977 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Formulas to calculate your NET profit and RETURN ON INVESTMENT
 
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Using excel to calculate NET and ROI
Views: 179 Ken Allewelt
Return on capital | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to return on capital and cost of capital. Using these concepts to decide where to invest. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/investment-consumption/v/investment-vs-consumption-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/investment-consumption/v/human-capital?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: When are you using capital to create more things (investment) vs. for consumption (we all need to consume a bit to be happy). When you do invest, how do you compare risk to return? Can capital include human abilities? This tutorial hodge-podge covers it all. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 157701 Khan Academy
Chapter 1: Explanation How To Calculate Property Investment - Net vs Gross Yield
 
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This Video is the first out of three within our "understanding returns on investment" trilogy. In chapter one Hadar Orkibi shares his simple return on an investment calculating formula. This video explains the difference between Gross and Net Yields. New Zealand Property Investors Network: http://www.PropertyGenie.co.nz/author/hadar-orkibi
Views: 3044 NZPropertyInvestors
Episode 99: How to Calculate Net Present Value
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1C07Z5S View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Net Present Value, commonly referred to as NPV, is a capital budgeting tool used in corporate finance and is designed to help firms assess the financial feasibility of various capital expenditures. Based largely on the time value of money, NPV compares the value of the initial investment to the cash flow generated over a number of years. An NPV greater than 0 supports the acceptance of the project, while an NPV less than 0 supports the rejection of the project. Over the course of this video we'll walk through how to calculate NPV using the present value formula. Although the process is rather simple once you understand the basics, calculating NPV can be rather time consuming. To ensure accuracy make sure that you are organized when writing out your calculations as one number can certainly affect your results. If you have any questions please leave a comment and I'll do my best to back to you. Thanks for watching.
Views: 196775 Alanis Business Academy
Expected return and its calculations - NET OUTCOME is + or - .
 
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The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return.positive or negative average net outcome
Views: 218 financeschoolin
Real Estate Investing Terms Part 2 - Internal Rate of Return (IRR) & Net Present Value (NPV)
 
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For an experienced SF Bay Area real estate agent visit http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com Like me on Facebook: http://fb.com/iLiveInTheBayArea Thumbs up, favorite, share, subscribe and make a comment! Welcome to part two of my investing terms video. We're going to continue off of the same scenario we were speaking of in my "Investing Terms Part 1" video, which discussed NOI, Cap Rate and Cash on Cash. As a refresher of what the details were in regards to the property, we were looking at a $2m income property that made $150k NOI. We figured the cap rate was 7.5%, and that if we used leverage our cash on cash return jumped up to 8.775%. Now, we're going to get into the two more complex formulas. The first one we're going to go over is called Internal Rate of Return, or IRR. The second is called Net present value, or NPV. Both of these can correlate with each other quite often, but let's take them on one by one. First, the IRR concept. IRR basically is looking at the investment OVERALL, from START to FINISH -- and the key word there is FINISH because there must be an exit strategy -- and determining how what percentage you made. So let's take a look at our property. $2M to buy it cash, $150k for 3 years, and then at the end of the 3rd year a huge bonus of $4M. Using IRR we've made 32.10%. As I explained our money has made 32.10% every year from start to finish...again, the key word there is finish. Which brings us finally to the Net Present Value, or NPV. Net Present Value means to convert all the future cash flows into today's dollars. Which even for me is still a bit of a confusing way to understand it. Let's go back to the bank we just left. Here you are sitting at a table with a good investor friend of yours. You tell your friend all the details of what just happened the last 3 years. How you gave the bank $2M and they gave you back $150k every year for 3 years...then how after 3 years you went to go take your $2M out and instead they gave you $4M. You're good investor friend explains everything about the Internal Rate of Return and basically how much money you just made year after year. While you guys are talking, he or she asks you...how much were you okay with making??? Kind of an odd question, but a valid one. As an investor, you have to know how much you are comfortable with making. This is discussed more in my "Determining Net Present Value" video. For the sake of argument, let's say you tell your friend you were more than comfortable making 20%, and that over 32% was great, but MUCH higher than you expected. What you can now do is determine the Net Present Value. In other words, if you could go back in time and see what you would make per year and when you took your money out, how much *COULD* you have paid in the BEGINNING and still have made that 20%? Well, let's look at our property in the same fashion. Making $150k/year and you make $4M at the end of 3 years, how much more could you have paid to still make a 20% IRR? After plugging in a few numbers, the amount it $630,787. In other words, if you pay the original $2M, PLUS the additional $630,787, you're new IRR will be 20%...right at the percentage you were comfortable with... Now at this point you may be asking why you would need this information?? Let's say you are looking at a property and there are a lot of interested buyers and of course multiple offers. Obviously there can only be one buyer. By knowing your desired NPV and plugging it in your formula you can see how high would be your maximum to where you would still make your desired return. This works in the opposite manner. If you're looking at this same property and your NPV target was 35%, you would be finding out how much LESS you had to pay for the property. Remember that if you're looking for a quick judgment snapshot, think of IRV for your cap rate formula. If you're looking to hold a property for a while and what to figure out what your making after all expenses -- even if you have a loan, use your cash on cash formula. If want to know the true value of your investment from start to finish, think internal rate of return. And if you're trying to find out the difference of what you need to accomplish to hit that target IRR, think of the Net Present Value. Of course, there's a few more formulas out there in the investment world, but when it comes to income property, these will definitely give you a leg up in determining what your investment is really worth...now that's good to know. Contact Davide Pio Today | SF Bay Area Real Estate http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com | 510-815-2000
What is NOI - Real Estate with Grant Cardone
 
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Our offerings under Rule 506(c) are for accredited investors only. GENERALLY, NO SALE MAY BE MADE TO YOU IN THIS OFFERING IF THE AGGREGATE PURCHASE PRICE YOU PAY IS MORE THAN 10% OF THE GREATER OF YOUR ANNUAL INCOME OR NET WORTH. DIFFERENT RULES APPLY TO ACCREDITED INVESTORS AND NON-NATURAL PERSONS. BEFORE MAKING ANY REPRESENTATION THAT YOUR INVESTMENT DOES NOT EXCEED APPLICABLE THRESHOLDS, WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO REVIEW RULE 251(D)(2)(I)(C) OF REGULATION A. FOR GENERAL INFORMATION ON INVESTING, WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO REFER TO WWW.INVESTOR.GOV. I want to give you my new Real Estate book for FREE! Just follow this link: https://10x.grantcardone.com/real-estate-made-simple-book The NOI is Net Operating Income. You have income, expenses, and then you have NOI. 5 units and above are dependent on NOI. It’s what the price is based off of, what the banks look at, and what the cap rate is made from. To determine the NOI you take Gross income minus expenses = NOI. The higher the NOI the more cash flow it’s going to produce. 3 questions to ask in multi-family: 1.How much will you pay for the property? 2.How much will it operate for? 3.How much can you sell it for when you exit? You can make money with any of these three ways, but ideally all three. Keep in mind that as soon as something comes on the market and it becomes a good deal with a good NOI, you often have over 10 or more buyers coming in immediately. Loopnet is the garbage dump for properties that aren’t selling. As an example, there is a deal for 14 units in Athens, Georgia. It costs 750K so you’d put 190K down and finance 460K. It’s 70% occupied. The NOI is 45K and the debt would be 32K annually. That means you’d basically be putting 190K at risk to make $1300 a month. That deal probably isn’t worth it! The bottom line is you have to know what you are doing with any investment. GrantCardone.com http://www.grantcardone.com
Views: 102497 Grant Cardone
Commercial Real Estate - NOI, Cap Rate, & Price
 
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A quick description of Net Operating Income, Capitalization Rate, and Price - What they are, how they interact with each other, how to use them, etc. If I have made any mistakes, or omitted what seems like important relevant info then please message me or leave a comment! http://relevantproperties.com
Views: 136591 InvestRelevant
How to Retire Early: The Shockingly Simple Math
 
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Enroll in our Personal Finance Masterclass for just $10: https://www.videoschoolonline.com/YTFinance How to retire early - let's break down the steps to early retirement. Take a premium course at http://www.videoschoolonline.com/course-library/ This video shows you how to retire early with shockingly simple math. I've been a personal finance nerd for a while, and the idea of early retirement is really interesting. I'm a huge fan of Mr. Money Mustache who wrote a great article on the shockingly simple math behind early retirement. Since I make videos, I wanted to take his theories and break them down into a digestible video. I hope you enjoy! And like I say in the video, please like and share this video, then leave a comment. What do you think? Is this amazing or crazy? What is your savings rate? What other personal finance questions do you have? I credit a lot of this work/theory to Mr Money Mustache. Read his full article about it here (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/01/13/the-shockingly-simple-math-behind-early-retirement/). Also, check out this cool early retirement calculator (https://networthify.com/calculator/earlyretirement?income=50000&initialBalance=0&expenses=17000&annualPct=5&withdrawalRate=4) Script: Hi, my name is Phil. I’m a video creator and online instructor. I’m also a personal finance nerd. Because of that, I want to create a series of videos that breaks down some of the most mystifying topics that plague our society. In a world where people’s finances are typically locked away and not-talked about, I believe opening up the gates of financial conversation will help everyone live a better and smarter life. In this first video, I want to explain the shockingly simple math behind early retirement - thanks to one of my biggest heroes, Mr Money Mustache. While the ability to retire may seem like a distant and unreachable goal for many, the premise comes down to one thing. You need to invest money so that it earns more money. This could be investing in stocks or bonds, real estate, or any other of investment vehicles. As soon as your investments earn enough money for you to live on each year, you are able to retire. Let’s break it down further to know when you can retire. The most important concept is knowing your savings rate, basically how much you make minus your expenses. If you spend 100% of your income, you will never retire… because you will never be able to invest any money that earns money for retirement. If you spend 0% of your income, you can retire right now… because somehow you are living without needing to make any more money. Between 0% and 100% are a number of savings rates that correlate with the years it will take to retire. For this, let’s assume your annual investment return is 5% (which is conservatively low) and your withdrawal rate is 4%… meaning you spend 4% of your net worth each year. For example, if you have a $1,000,000 net worth, and you live on $40,000. If your savings rate is 10%, you will be able to safely retire after 51.4 years. Safely, meaning you will never run out of money. If your savings rate is 25%, you can retire in 31.9 years. 50%, you can retire in 16.6 years. And if you can somehow save 75% of your income, you can retire in 7.1 years. Now getting to that savings rate might not be easy in our world of societal pressures, keeping up with the Joneses, and bad habits. But you can get closer by making smart decisions, avoiding debt, and living simply. The key take away is… Cutting your spending rate is way more powerful than increasing your income because no matter how much money you make, decreasing your spending will speed up the process. A note, The math behind early retirement works if you are working a minimum wage job or a 7-figure CEO salary. It’s all about the savings rate. So if you want to retire in 10 years, the math tells us that you need to save 66% of your income. Now there is a lot that I didn’t talk about - like how to invest, and how to cut expenses to get to a high savings rate. Those will come in a future video. For now, get excited about the honest truth about retirement (and early retirement at that!)! Let me know what you think in the comments below? Is this exciting or bogus? Until next time… start being money smart. Please subscribe to the channel and leave a comment below! Video School Online: http://www.videoschoolonline.com Courses: http://www.videoschoolonline.com/course-library/ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/philebiner Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/videoschoolonline
Capital Budgeting Techniques (PB, ARR, NPV, PI & IRR) ~ Financial Management for B.Com/CA/CS/CMA
 
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Explained various capital budgeting techniques with the help of one single question which are : 1. Pay Back Method 2. Average Rate of Return Method 3. Net Present Value Method 4. Profitability Index Method 5. Internal Rate of Return Method Student can also watch the following lectures related with the Financial Management : 1. Capital Budgeting (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOaGNDmKpzo 2. How to calculate PVF, PVAF, CVF, CVAF values on calculator : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUTDq6hpais 3. Present Value of Perpetuity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVxvJ_JTiug 4. Time Value of Money (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeox8DLagHU 5. Cost of Capital (Cost of Debt, Preference Shares, Equity and Retained Earnings) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGN_IonxroE 6. Cash Budget (Introduction) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Yx5bFOZfo 🔴 Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal 🔴 Download Assignments: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing 🔴 Connect with Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CANareshAggarwal #CapitalBudgeting #FinancialManagement
Views: 289494 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
How to Calculate Numbers on a Rental Property
 
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Discover our straight-forward and easy to use formula for calculating the numbers on a prospective rental property purchase. Welcome to Hipster’s first how-to video! I’m going to show you how to run quick numbers on a rental property. You can use this easy and fast formula for any property you’re looking at. I'll be behind the scenes doing the calculations on my white board and calculator (yes, it really is that big!) to show you how it works. This is an actual rental property I'm using as an example, including the actual purchase price and numbers. (You have to love my handwriting!) You always want to verify the numbers you run before you buy any property (for example, with a property manager), but it helps to do your homework first. This particular house is in Indianapolis and gets $1,075 in rent. It was built in 2002. Super cute little house: three bedroom, two bath. But all we care about right now is the numbers… Want to know more about the latest deals? Subscribe to our Newsletter: http://goo.gl/41tmRK ----- Are you a responsible professional ages 30-49 and want to make smart investments? Have you thought about real estate investing but ruled it out because it sounded complicated or risky? Do you want to grow your money, but are worried about scams and ripoffs? Are you a cool person who I’d just enjoy saying “hi” to? If you answered "YES" to any of those questions, then we should talk. I help people just like you to find smart, safe, passive real estate investments so your money is working hard for you, even if you lack real estate investing knowledge. If you're cautious or nervous, then I can help you get educated on the best real estate investments possible and guide you towards getting that first investment property under your belt. When the passive income starts flowing, you'll be hooked and be ready for more properties, and I can introduce you to actual high quality deals and partners that I would, and do, actually invest in myself. I promise, I won’t refer you to anyone I haven’t personally bought through myself. (true story)
Views: 361856 Hipster Investments
How to Calculate Net Present Value (Npv) in Excel
 
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In this tutorial, you will learn to calculate Net Present Value, or NPV, in Excel. In this tutorial, you will learn to calculate Net Present Value, or NPV, in Excel. Net Present Value is a financial function that is calculated for an investment, and it represents the present value of the investment minus the amount of money that costs to buy in. Excel offers a preset function for this called NPV. Please be aware that all the investment cash flows must occur at the same interval for the calculation to be accurate. NPV has two arguments: rate -- which refers to the discount rate, and the range of values that contains future cash flows. Step 1: Open the document in which you want to calculate NPV. Step 2. Go to the cell where you want the function to be calculated, and type the following: = npv (our discount rate /12 as the rate is compounded monthly, the range of values you want to be considered)+the initial investment, in our case the starting 100,000$. Step 3. Excel will calculate for you the Net Present Value of this investment. Step 4. Go to the cell that you want to hold the NPV result for comparison, and type: =npv(the same discount rate/12,the range of values)+the initial investment. Hit Enter. Step 5. Excel will calculate for you the Net Present Value of this investment. Step 6. Now that we see both results, we will agree that the first option is better and proceed with it. Result: Congratulations, you have learned how to calculate the Net Present Value in Excel.
Net Investment
 
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An Easy Overview Of Net Investment
Views: 599 Christopher Hunt
Return on Investment (ROI) | Managerial Accounting | CMA Exam | Ch 11 P 2
 
17:22
Residual income, common fixed cost, Return on investment, ROI, segment margin, traceable fixed cost Present value of single amount, present value of annuity, ordinary annuity, annuity due, future value of annuity, future value of annuity, return on investment, net present value, NPV, internal rate of return, IRR, payback period, cost of capital, capital budgeting, simple rate of return, Ratio analysis, book value per share, return on stockholders equity, return on equity, payout ratio, retention ratio, financial statement analysis, profitability ratio, long term solvency ratio,
Buyer Net Income vs Seller Net Income in Multifamily and Commercial Investment Real Estate
 
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Detailed quantitative video on the stark differences between how sellers calculate Net Operating Income and how Buyers calculate Net Operating Income. The key is to help sellers understand how buyers and the lenders use market rate adjustments to determine value.
Views: 108 Beau Beery
3 Easy Steps! IRR Internal Rate of Return Lecture on How to Calculate Internal Rate of Return
 
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OMG wow! Soooo easy I subscribed here http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mbabullshitdotcom for Internal Rate of Return or IRR. In advance of going deeper into this approach, we need to evaluate the definition of "Rate of Return" (with no "internal" yet). Rate of Return would be the "speed" you are going to earn back profit on an annual basis, every twelve months, endlessly, in contrast to an amount you in the beginning invest. With the intention that it can be compared to the invested bigger sum, this is written just like a percent (%). By way of example, if you invest 100 dollars, and you earn back 3 dollars per annum endlessly, then the "rate of return" is 3%. Trouble-free, is it not? But let us alter the situation somewhat. Suppose, on the same $100 investment previously mentioned, you will definitely make money for a couple of years... and not all in identical amounts in each year? And what if the money coming in will likely stop after a certain number of years? For instance, you are going to get $5 on your 1st year, possibly $8 on your 2nd year, $3 around the third year, and $95 during the fourth year (which could become a final year... so it's not ad infinitum). What is the rate of return now? As you can tell, on this most recent problem, it isn't really easy to find the percentage rate. This is because it's not as simple as in the initial case above for the reason that the annual cash flow is not just a standardizedsum (similar to the $3 in the initial situation above) and it's not without end. This percentage within this newest situation has become popularly known as Internal Rate of Return. Given that it is really not simple to get the percentage, we can easily declare it really is like "a hidden" percent... therefore the term "internal"... due to the reason that the word "internal" is similar to a formal way of expressing "hidden". How is the principle beneficial? If the IRR of your respective undertaking or business enterprise is less than your cost of debt or the total interest rate you would pay to your bank (in case you raise funds money coming from the bank to do the investment or plan), then it is a foul deal. Exactly why? Remember! Because if you will pay 3% to your bank to accomplish a venture or make an investment decision, and then it produces an IRR of only 2%, then you definitely lose 1%. Then again, when your IRR or Internal Rate of Return is above the percentage at which one would borrow from the bank to cover an investment or task, then it is a fine deal, as a result of the helpful "spread" in between your rate of return and cost of debt. Similarly, in case your IRR is the same thing as the interest one would pay to your bank, then you're break-even. This, in summary, is really a simple clarification of IRR. Note that in more difficult problems, you might weigh up your internal rate of return not simply to your cost of debt, but to you cost of equity or weighted average cost of capital or WACC instead. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKqzSGMz9Sk what is irr, the internal rate of return, what is internal rate of return, irr, internal rate of return, khan academy, investopedia
Views: 525201 MBAbullshitDotCom
Get the Net Present Value of a Project Calculation - Finance in Excel - NPV()
 
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Premium Course: https://www.teachexcel.com/premium-courses/68/idiot-proof-forms-in-excel?src=youtube Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt Excel Tutorials: https://www.teachexcel.com/src=yt This tutorial shows you how to get the Net Present Value of a project or business venture in the future using excel. You can do this very easily in excel spreadsheets and this will teach you how to do that using the estimated cash flows of a project. The NPV() function is used for the calculations. This is also a basic discounted cash flows example. This includes discount rate and number of periods in order to use the npv function. To follow along with the spreadsheet used in the video and also to get free excel macros, tips, and more video tutorials, go to the site: http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
Views: 266719 TeachExcel
LCGE II - Cumulative Net Investment Loss (2014)
 
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Business Career College is a national financial services education provider. See our insurance, financial planning and continuing education courses, including self-paced and instructor led options, at https://www.businesscareercollege.com For great industry articles, follow on Twitter (https://twitter.com/JasonWattBCC) or like on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BusinessCareerCollege/).
Views: 2248 BCC Education
Best INVESTMENT idea opportunity in India in Hindi, What is PPF Account, PPF Calculator, PPF vs FD
 
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Want a FREE Headphones? Watch this Video- https://youtu.be/XUJVZPWrU8k Want to SAVE MONEY ? Download this Free Expense Tracking App to Save Money and Create Wealth- https://goo.gl/QZXs4N This Video Explains you how you can double, triple, or multiply your money with PPF Account, You Can Start a Public Provident Fund (PPF) Account with your bank where you have your savings account like- SBI, PNB, ICICI Bank, etc. This video will tell you about the rules of PPF, What is PPF, Minimum amount required opening PPF, Minimum amount to deposit in PPF in one financial year, Maximum amount to be deposit in a year in PPF, when can withdraw money from PPF, PPF Calculator in Hindi, and so on. And this video will motivate you also for better savings and tell you in brief how to save a lot of money with your earnings, salaries, business, etc. PPF account is far better than FD (Fixed Deposits) and RD (Recurring Deposits). My Gears:- Camera- https://amzn.to/2CeUAvI Phone- https://amzn.to/2Pz2unL Laptop- https://amzn.to/2yHkRPW Cam stick- https://amzn.to/2yNy9uz 2nd Camera- https://amzn.to/2yEIvfX Mini Tripod- https://amzn.to/2OmLQLk Mic- https://amzn.to/2CgUBzi Desktop- https://amzn.to/2Aa12D0 Thanks and Regards Invisible Baba -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "BAAR BAAR Apna PHONE CHECK Karte ho ? TOH YE VIDEO DEKHO" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8I3zON0-uTY -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 582642 Invisible BABA
Incremental IRR
 
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Due to differences in the scale, timing, and riskiness of projects, we cannot simply compare the IRRs (incremental rates of return) of two projects. However, we can compute the incremental cash flows of choosing one project versus the other and compute an incremental IRR for these cash flows. This incremental IRR can then be compared to the discount rate to determine which project is more profitable. That being said, the incremental IRR is problematic when some of the negative cash flows do not precede the positive cash flows. Furthermore, the incremental IRR tells us which project is more profitable but it does not tell us whether each of the projects has a positive NPV on a stand-alone basis. And, if the projects have different costs of capital, then we have the additional problem of not knowing the cost of capital to which we should be comparing the incremental IRR. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 59914 Edspira

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