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Videos uploaded by user “NanoTube - The National Nanotechnology Initiative”
Magnetoelectric Nanoparticles (MENs) to Treat Cancer
 
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This NDnano research project is focused on demonstrating the efficacy of using externally-controlled magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) as a drug delivery platform to target cancer cells. MENs have a magnetic (Fe/Co) core and a piezoelectric (barium titanate) shell. Using bioconjugation techniques, cancer drugs are bound to the MENs. The magnetic and electric properties of these carrier vehicles, in conjunction with the distinctive electric potentials of cancer cells, can be leveraged to concentrate therapy drugs at tumor sites and enable their selective penetration into cancer cells via a process called nanoelectroporation. Cancer cells experience greater electroporation effects under the small local electric fields generated by the MENs' piezoelectric shells than those experienced by normal cells and are therefore more permeable. Once the MENs penetrate the cancer cells, an alternating magnetic field is applied to the target site, which results in the drug being released from the MENs inside the cancer cell. University of Notre Dame's Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano) research group http://nano.nd.edu/
What are Quantum Dots?
 
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NIH's NIBIB's 60 Seconds of Science explains how quantum dots work and why they glow. Music by longzijun 'Chillvolution.'
Portable Devices for Disease Diagnostics
 
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Visit www.nano.gov/NanoFilmPublicVoting to view other movies from the Nano Film (www.nano.gov/VideoContest) contest and vote for your favorite. Shrinking chemical instrumentation can show the same improvements that have revolutionized the computer industry. Faster, cheaper, and portable are some of these benefits. With the worlds analytical instrumentation market in the billions of dollars and only 0.1% using small biosensors there is a vast market growth potential and need, as the shortcomings with large instruments can be solved. Imagine the benefits to mankind from the ability to do an analysis anywhere in the world at any time! The possibilities are endless. Our research focuses on fabricating such a device for an array of diseases. Simply changing the capture molecule on the sensor surface dictates which disease is being tested for. Fabricated at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, these sensors fit in the palm of the hand. The biosensors work on the nanoscale by detecting biological molecules in very small amounts. Taylor Mabe UNCG, Nanoscience Dept. University of North Carolina at Greensboro Jenna Schad Biology Dept. & Film Dept. University of North Carolina at Greensboro Laboratory website: Wei Group Website - https://sites.google.com/a/uncg.edu/wei-s-group-jsnn/home Joint School of Nanoscience & Nanoengineering website - http://jsnn.ncat.uncg.edu
What's a quantum dot?
 
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Western Carolina University graphic design student Ali Burke, explains a common nanomaterial, a quantum dot (QD). Ali's professor, Mary Anna LaFratta integrates science into her projects because "design is, in part, about making information easy to navigate and accessible. Visually explaining concepts related to STEM disciplines is one application of design and a potential career direction for students." Western Carolina University Professor Mary Anna LaFratta challenged her motion graphics students to create one minute animations to explore these questions and to illustrate nanotechnology: science, engineering, and technology at the nanoscale. Professors and students from the School of Art and Design and the School of Music collaborated to compose music, record narration, and build animations.The animation scripts came from nanotechnology experts at nano.gov and the animations are airing via Science Matters on the Community Idea Stations PBS TV stations in Central Virginia. This project spans science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics and media (STEAM+M) For more information check out nano.gov and ideastations.org/science-matters/hot-shots/hot-jobs/whats-quantum-dot
Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis
 
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JCAP was established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy Energy Innovation Hub that aims to find new and effective ways to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. JCAP is led by a team from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and brings together more than 100 world-class scientists and engineers from Caltech and its lead partner, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. JCAP also draws on the expertise and capabilities of key partners from the University of California campuses at Irvine (UCI) and San Diego (UCSD), and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. JCAP is the Nation’s largest research program dedicated to the advancement of solar-fuels generation science and technology. http://solarfuelshub.org/
The Nano Song
 
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Everything you need to know about the wonders of nanotechnology... as a musical... with puppets...
High density energy storage using self assembled materials
 
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Many alternative fuels that may help slow down global warming suffer from technical barriers. Hydrogen and methane gas (also called 'natural gas') are both more environmentally friendly than gasoline, but contain very little energy per unit of volume. This video shows how self-assembled porous materials can lead to fuel tanks that are able to highly concentrate gaseous fuels and thus hold a lot of energy in a small space. Cutting edge algorithms and materials are depicted, drawing from research and development in the previous two years at Northwestern University in the Snurr and Hupp laboratories.
A real time water sensor
 
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"We are working on the real time detection of water contaminants, including heavy metal ions and bacteria, etc. It can be used for the early warning of water pollution, water quality assessment, and continuous monitoring, which will eventually help to protect public health. It is realized as an electronic sensor, which employs the advanced thin layer nanomaterial and takes advantage of its electrical properties. We are making efforts to enable the sensor to monitor the quality of different kinds of water sources, nature water, drinking water, and more. Not only working in the lab, in the near future we hope it could be commercialized and thus maximize its benefits in the field of human health protection." University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Nanotechnology for Sustainable Technology and Environment http://www4.uwm.edu/nsee/
Cloaking Using Nanotechnology
 
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In this video, Josh Landis and Mitch Butler discuss metamaterials; a type of nanotechnology. These materials can theoretically make objects disappear from plain sight. This cloaking technology has a wide range of applications and could forever change our "view" of the world.
Nanotechnology at the White House Science Fair
 
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President Obama learns about a nanotechnology-enabled sensor for detecting signs of cardiac arrest from White House Science Fair participant Ruchi Pandya.
Nanomanufacturing
 
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NSF's Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing proves good test bed for large-scale nanomanufacturing designs
Single Breath Disease Diagnostics Breathalyzer
 
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This invention could give new meaning to the term “bad breath!” It’s the Single Breath Disease Diagnostics Breathalyzer, and when you blow into it, you get tested for a biomarker—a sign of disease. For as amazing as that sounds, the process is actually very simple thanks to ceramics nanotechnology.
3D Printed Microfluidic Channels
 
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Visit www.nano.gov/NanoFilmPublicVoting to view other movies from the Nano Film (www.nano.gov/VideoContest) contest and vote for your favorite. This work demonstrates a simple method to fabricate 3D microchannels and microvasculature at room temperature by direct-writing liquid metal as a sacrificial template. The printed structures can be embedded in a variety of soft (e.g. elastomeric) and rigid (e.g. thermoset) polymers. Whereas conventional fabrication procedures typically confine microchannels to 2D planes, the geometry of the printed microchannels can be varied from a simple 2D network to complex 3D architectures without using lithography. The method produces robust monolithic structures without the need for any bonding or assembling techniques that often limit the materials of construction of conventional microchannels. Removing select portions of the metal leaves behind 3D metal features that can be used as antennas, interconnects, or electrodes for interfacing with lab-on-a-chip devices. This mechanism allows the rapid prototyping and development of personalized healthcare sensors that can be embedded in consumer-targeted wearable bio-monitoring devices. Dishit Parekh Advisor: Michael D. Dickey Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC Laboratory website: www.che.ncsu.edu/dickeygroup/index.php
DARPA New Voices - Max Shulaker
 
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DARPA Risers Max Shulaker (Stanford) explains his ongoing research into enabling much faster, lower-power microchips. He spoke at DARPA's "Wait, What?" forum on Sept. 10, 2015.
How is nanotechnology helping to protect the environment?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Savage from the National Science Foundation
ASME Nanotechnology in Action
 
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Cleanrooms are essential for fabricating micro- and nanoscale devices. In this video, James Marti, PhD., senior scientist at Minnesota Nano Center (MNC), highlights the benefits of cleanrooms and how they support interdisciplinary research in nanoscience and applied nanotechnology. The cleanroom at MNC offers ultra-high resolution lithography tools, including a state-of-the-art electron beam lithography tool capable of fabricating sub-10 nm features. Visit https://www.asme.org/ to learn more.
What are the top 10 tools for nanotechnology for a biophysicist?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Lindsay from Arizona State University
Big Things from a Tiny World
 
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Learn how nanotechnology can address some of the world's biggest challenges and improve our everyday lives.
Storing the Library of Congress in a Device the Size of a Sugar Cube
 
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When President Clinton announced the National Nanotechnology Initiative in 2000, he listed three challenges for the nanotechnology community. Watch experts discuss the progress that has been made to meet one of those challenges.
Changing the World with Nano-Textured Silicon: A Conversation with Dr. Marcie Black
 
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In this special anniversary episode of Stories from the NNI, Dr. Lisa Friedersdorf, Director of NNCO, talks to Dr. Marcie Black, CEO and Co-founder of Advanced Silicon Group. Marcie and Lisa discuss the promise of nanotechnology to solve the world’s problems, Marcie’s experience developing her technology, and her thoughts on the NNI. CREDITS Special thanks to: Dr. Marcie Black CEO and Co-founder Advanced Silicon Group Music: Corporate Uplifting by Scott Holmes http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/Corporate__Motivational_Music/Corporate_Uplifting_1985 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode Produced by: Dr. Mallory Hinks AAAS S&T Policy Fellow at NNCO Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this podcast are those of the guest and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office or United States Government. Additionally, mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by any of the aforementioned parties. Any mention of commercial products, processes, or services cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation.
Why do we need a National Nanotechnology Initiative?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Whitman from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
How will nanotechnology impact additive manufacturing in the next 5 years?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Kate from the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Kentucky Multi-Scale Manufacturing and Nano Integration Node http://www.kymultiscale.net/ http://www.nnci.net/
Moth Inspired Solar Materials
 
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Researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Functional Nanomaterials look to moth eyes to improve solar materials
How are textile nanotechnologies improving both our air and water?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Ford from the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Research Triangle Nanotechnology Network Node https://www.rtnn.ncsu.edu/
Chlorination-less
 
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"Access to clean water is a major international issue that must not be ignored. Our research is finding a new method for the disinfection of drinking water. Even so, chlorination is the most common treatment for the disinfection of drinking water, but has a lot of disadvantages. Disinfectant by-products (DBP’s) produced by the chlorine disinfection process can cause health problems such as cancer to humans that drink water or inhale vapor. Also some bacteria are able to adapt to this chemical treatment. This is why we are proposing a physical treatment using Ultra Dispersed Diamond (UDD) for the disinfection of drinking water. The UDD is a nanodiamond powder, which has bactericidal properties and is biocompatible. After applying the UDD material to the contaminated water we have promising results. There was a reduction of fecal E. coli colonies as time passed and the density of the material increases. This process will be healthier, cheaper, and more environmentally friendly since it is reusable." University of Puerto Rico , Rio Piedras Campus Laboratory website: http://www.uprnano.com/ Funding source: National Science Foundation and NASA EPSCoR
Turning MXene into Highly Conductive Clay
 
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MXenes, an exciting new family of two-dimensional transition metal carbides, have recently been shown to absorb and release water on the atomic scale as seen in clays. However, MXenes are also highly electrically conductive materials. The combination of these two properties is very exciting, and we have exploited it to produce electrodes for supercapacitors with very high charge storage per unit volume. This could lead to smaller, slimmer mobile electronic devices. The new process also trims down the time required, is safer and easier than its predecessor, and requires no binders or conductive additives as is the case for other materials. Drexel University Laboratory websites: http://max.materials.drexel.edu/ ; http://nano.materials.drexel.edu/ ; http://nano.drexel.edu/ Funding sources: US National Science Foundation under grant number DMR-1310245 ; Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST) Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, and Office of Basic Energy Sciences
How can nanotechnology revolutionize the agriculture and food system?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Scott from Cornell University
New nanotechnology to produce sustainable, clean water for developing nations - Science Nation
 
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This technology would enable communities to produce their own water filters using biomass nanofibers, making clean water more accessible and affordable Description: The world's population is projected to increase by 2-3 billion over the next 40 years. Already, more than three quarters of a billion people lack access to clean drinking water and 85 percent live in the driest areas of the planet. Those statistics are inspiring chemist Ben Hsiao and his team at Stony Brook University. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the team is hard at work designing nanometer-scale water filters that could soon make clean drinking water available and affordable for even the poorest of the poor. Traditional water filters are made of polymer membranes with tiny pores to filter out bacteria and viruses. Hsiao's filters are made of fibers that are all tangled up, and the pores are the natural gaps between the strands. The team's first success at making the new nanofilters uses a technique called electrospinning to produce nanofibers under an electrical field. Hsaio's team is also looking to cut costs even further by using "biomass" nanofibers extracted from trees, grasses, shrubs -- even old paper. Hsiao says it will be a few years yet before the environmentally friendly biomass filters are ready for widespread use in developing countries, but the filters will eliminate the need to build polymer plants in developing areas. Ultimately, those filters could be produced locally with native biomass or biowaste. The research in this episode was supported by NSF award #1019370, Breakthrough Concepts on Nanofibrous Membranes with Directed Water Channels for Energy-Saving Water Purification. NSF Grant URL: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showA... Miles O'Brien, Science Nation Correspondent Kate Tobin, Science Nation Producer
Helping Nanotechnology Work for Everyone
 
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Center for Nanotechnology in Society dedicated to helping the public become a voice in nano and other emerging technologies When you think of researchers working on nanotechnology, you probably picture scientists and engineers manipulating incredibly small structures in a state-of-the-art lab. But there are many others who are also interested in the future of this technology, including community planners, political scientists, urban designers--maybe even your next door neighbor. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University is engaging the public and a wide range of experts to think deeply about where nano and other emerging technologies are headed and how to make them work effectively for everyone. Recent and ongoing activities include the Futurescape City Tours, the Phoenix 2050 Design Studio, the Nano Around the World card game and the Life Cycle Assessment for Responsible Innovation workshop. The research in this episode was supported by NSF awards #0937391 and #0531194, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University.
Winner of the 2016 Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes Contest - Nanoman
 
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Eric Liu from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia, won with "Nanoman," who fights the malignant crab-monster "Cancer." Check out the press release - http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=138323
How will nanotechnology enable many marvelous things?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Adams from Rice University
From Lab to Fab  Pioneers in Nano Manufacturing
 
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How can we mass-produce sophisticated products from materials too small to see? "From Lab to Fab" follows the story of two nanotech entrepreneurs navigating the rocky road from discovery to commercialization, with products ranging from tiny implantable body sensors to bullet-proof vests and aircraft flooring. Produced by the Museum of Science, Boston, in collaboration with the Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing, headquartered at Northeastern University, with funding from the National Science Foundation (EEC-0832785, CMMI-1344567). Executive Producer: Carol Lynn Alpert. For Lawrence Klein Productions LLC, Director: Lawrence Klein; Editor: Sam Green; Cinematography: Gary Henoch; Animation: James Sullivan. Inquiries: [email protected] ©2015 Museum of Science. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License
Connecting Classrooms and Researchers with the Sustainable Nano Blog
 
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Dr. Miriam Krause discusses ways that Sustainable Nano (sustainable-nano.com) can benefit and involve K-12 educators and students. Sustainable Nano is produced by the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology, a multi-institute chemistry research center funded by the National Science Foundation. This webinar will include information on how the blog and podcast are produced and the types of educational resources provided so far. For more information on the Teaching Nano & Emerging Technologies Network, please visit www.nano.gov/TeacherNetwork.
Nanotube Sponge
 
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A sponge made of pure carbon nanotubes with a dash of boron shows remarkable ability to absorb oil spills from the surface of water. For more: http://news.rice.edu/2012/04/16/nanosponges-soak-up-oil-again-and-again-2/
Nanotechnology 101 The Biggest Thing You've Never Seen
 
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Audio and slides from the public lecture given by the Director of the U.S. Government's National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), Dr. Michael Meador, at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. Dr. Michael Meador discusses the fundamentals of nanotechnology—what it is and why it’s unique—and how this emerging, disruptive technology will change the world. From invisibility cloaks to lightweight, fuel-efficient vehicles to a cure for cancer, nanotechnology might just be the biggest thing you can’t see.
How can nanotechnology help us improve the health and safety of the environment and ourselves?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Farrell from the NIH National Cancer Institute
How do Doctors Target Cancer Cells?
 
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While the tools that allow scientists to work at the nanoscale have only been around for a few decades, biology has always operated at the nanoscale. Researchers are designing nanomaterials to take advantage of the body’s natural processes in order to more precisely target and treat disease. This is especially true with some types of cancer. Student animator Steven Handy, from Western Carolina University, was able to show how nanotechnology is allowing doctors to protect healthy cells while attacking tumors with chemotherapy. Professors and students from the School of Art and Design and the School of Music collaborated to compose music, record narration, and build animations.The animation scripts came from nanotechnology experts at nano.gov and the animations are airing via Science Matters on the Community Idea Stations PBS TV stations in Central Virginia. This project spans science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics and media (STEAM+M) For more information check out nano.gov and http://ideastations.org/science-matters/hot-shots/hot-jobs/how-do-doctors-target-diseased-cells
Using Nanotechnology to Clean Water: A Conversation with Pedro Alvarez
 
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In this special anniversary episode of Stories from the NNI, Dr. Lisa Friedersdorf, Director of NNCO, talks to Prof. Pedro Alvarez, of Rice University. Pedro and Lisa discuss the role nanotechnology plays in water security, exciting research results and applications, and his thoughts on the NNI. CREDITS Special thanks to: Prof. Pedro Alverez Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Rice University Music: Corporate Uplifting by Scott Holmes http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/Corporate__Motivational_Music/Corporate_Uplifting_1985 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode Produced by: Dr. Mallory Hinks AAAS S&T Policy Fellow at NNCO Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this podcast are those of the guest and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office or United States Government. Additionally, mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by any of the aforementioned parties. Any mention of commercial products, processes, or services cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation.
Starting Up with a Nanosensor
 
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Mei He, Kansas State University
How will nanotechnology help bring about universal access to clean water?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Rodrigues from the University of Houston
Using Lasers to Create Super-hydrophobic Materials
 
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Scientists at the University of Rochester have used lasers to transform metals into extremely water repellent, or super-hydrophobic, materials without the need for temporary coatings. Super-hydrophobic materials are desirable for a number of applications such as rust prevention, anti-icing, or even in sanitation uses. However, as Rochester’s Chunlei Guo explains, most current hydrophobic materials rely on chemical coatings. In a paper (http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/...) published in Journal of Applied Physics, Guo and his colleague at the University’s Institute of Optics, Anatoliy Vorobyev, describe a powerful and precise laser-patterning technique that creates an intricate pattern of micro- and nanoscale structures to give the metals their new properties.
What Can Nanotechnology Do for You
 
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For more information check out http://ideastations.org/science-matters/hot-shots/hot-jobs/what-can-nanotechnology-do-you
Spherical Nucleic Acids
 
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This animation describes the structure, properties, and uses of the spherical nucleic acid (SNA), a construct typically composed of a nanoparticle core and densely packed and highly oriented nucleic acid shell. This structure has unique architectural-dependent properties that set it apart from all other forms of nucleic acids. These properties make SNAs extremely useful in in vitro medical diagnostics, intracellular detection, and therapeutics. Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) were developed in the laboratory of Professor Chad A. Mirkin at Northwestern University under the auspices of the International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN). This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, and the National Science Foundation.
Applying a Lab Safety Culture to Nanotechnology: Educating the Next Generation of Nanoscientists
 
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This webinar will discuss how an effective culture of safety in the research laboratory facilitates safe and responsible nanomaterial research.
How is nanotechnology improving materials for space exploration?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Meador from NASA Glenn Research Center
How will sensor nanotechnology impact the environment and its effect on human health?
 
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Nano Nugget featuring Dr. Swager from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology