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How Do I Start Investing? How Do I Buy a Stock? | Ask A Fool
 
02:41
In this edition of "Ask a Fool," analyst Austin Smith answers the question "Where do I start? How do I choose and purchase a stock?" He defers to the proven Peter Lynch model of buying what you know, which means investing in companies that you personally understand and that have relatively transparent business models. For beginning investors, some popular stocks with easy-to-comprehend business drivers include McDonald's (NYSE: MCD), Starbucks (Nasdaq: SBUX), and Coca-Cola (NYSE: KO). Once you've identified a stock you're committed to, the next step is to open a brokerage account. Austin provides some popular companies as examples. You'll need your stock's ticker symbol, which can be found easily with a Google search, or by typing the company name into the search box at http://www.fool.com. Decide on the number of shares you'd like to buy, and then simply call your broker or use their online interface to place a trade. To compare online brokerages side-by-side and to learn more about what's involved with opening an account, visit Fool.com's "How to Invest" hub: http://bit.ly/17nlnx6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Do you have a question about stocks, investing, a specific company, managing your money, or any other aspect of the financial world? Simply email [email protected] and we'll do our best to get it answered! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com. Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 86676 The Motley Fool
Which Is Better, a 457 or a 401(k)? | Ask a Fool
 
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This video is part of The Motley Fool's "Ask a Fool" series. Have a question about stocks, investing, a specific company, managing your money, or any other aspect of the financial world? Simply email [email protected] and we'll do our best to get it answered! In this installment of Ask a Fool, Fool contributor Dan Caplinger takes a question from a Fool reader, who writes, "Which is better: a 457 or a 401(k)? If you had a choice for a 457 or a 401(k) or both to invest in, which would be the best option?" ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com. Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 21150 The Motley Fool
Which Index Fund to Invest in for the Long Term
 
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In this clip, Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp explain the differences between the two most popular market index funds, and which one will give you a better return on your investment. Also, they look into the different fee structures of several of the most popular firms you’d buy these funds from. This podcast was recorded on Mar. 8, 2016. Imagine owning Amazon.com (up over an insane 4,000% since 2001) when Internet sales rendered big-box retailers obsolete... Now an industry 99% of us use daily is set to implode... And 3 established companies are positioned to take advantage. Click http://bit.ly/1zQXjzy for a stunning presentation. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 11799 The Motley Fool
What's the Difference Between a Growth Stock and a Value Stock?
 
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The Motley Fool's Austin Smith answers the question: "What is the difference between a growth stock and a value stock?" Austin identifies value stocks as those which are mis-priced, or trading to a discount to their intrinsic value. Value investors are buying companies with the expectation that shares will rise to reflect the real value of the company. Meanwhile growth stocks are those which investors are buying with the expectation of large earnings in the future. There are a few tell-tale signs covered in the video to help you identify whether you're looking at one type of stock or another. Austin reminds investors that growth and value strategies aren't mutually exclusive, and thinks Warren Buffet said it best when he quipped that "growth and value investing are joined at the hip".
Views: 17241 The Motley Fool
Stocks or Mutual Funds in My Roth IRA? | Ask a Fool
 
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This video is part of The Motley Fool's "Ask a Fool" series. Have a question about stocks, investing, a specific company, managing your money, or any other aspect of the financial world? Simply email [email protected] and we'll do our best to get it answered! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com. Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 23368 The Motley Fool
How Amazon Makes Money: AWS
 
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If you need it in 2 days, Amazon is your go-to destination. The company has been at the forefront of the e-commerce revolution, unseating brick and mortar retail over the past two decades. You can’t hear words like “Alexa” and “Prime” without thinking of the company, proving the ridiculous reach of Amazon’s retail brand. But what if I told you that retail isn’t really how Amazon makes money? In this video, we’re going to break down the small segment that makes Amazon go, and the one that might fuel the next phase of its growth. In 2018 Amazon captured an estimated 50% of online sales in the U.S. en route to generating over $200 billion in retail sales in the U.S. and abroad. But retail operations aren’t a big moneymaker for Amazon. In fact, in some cases they cost the company cash. That $200 billion sales figure I mentioned before – it’s actually $208 billion. That’s the combined results of Amazon’s North America and International retail segments. Amazon is actually losing money on its international retail operations. Combined, the company’s retail operations only produce about $5 billion of operating income on that $208 billion in sales. That’s because the company competes on price and convenience, which means slim margins on sales and expensive priority shipping and logistics operations to get packages to customers fast. Thankfully for Jeff Bezos and co, Amazon has another operating segment that rakes in money – AWS. AWS stands for Amazon Web Services, and it’s a catch-all for the various cloud services Amazon provides that allow businesses to store information and deliver content. Amazon is the runaway leader in the cloud services space – in 2018 it owned nearly 30% of the overall market -- nearly twice the market share of the next closest competitor. That leadership position led to a big windfall for Amazon. In 2018, AWS booked almost $26 billion in revenue, but because cloud services is a high-margin business that scales well, it generated over $7 billion in operating income. Put another way, Amazon made the same amount of money on $26 billion in AWS revenue as it did on $140 billion from its North American retail operations. Over the coming years, AWS’s impact on the business will only be more pronounced – the segment is grew 47% in 2018, compared to 33% growth in North American retail and 21% growth in the company’s international segment. AWS is Amazon’s cash cow right now, but the company has another major moneymaker in the works. Amazon has been aggressively investing in a digital advertising. Based on management’s comments, it is already a “multi-billion-dollar business” – most estimates peg it at around $10 billion in revenue in 2018. Investors should be thrilled to hear that, because digital ads are even more lucrative than the company’s AWS business, and the segment grew over 90% last year and doesn’t show many signs of slowing down. So AWS is how Amazon makes money… for now. But we might have to re-do this video in a year or two. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 8815 The Motley Fool
Social Security Benefits: Is Waiting Just Plain Wrong?
 
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Social Security gives you the choice of whether to take smaller benefits as early as age 62 or wait for larger benefits until as late as age 70. Even though countless analysts have shown that many people get more money in the long run by waiting longer before taking Social Security benefits, millions remain unconvinced and take them as early as they can. In the following video, Dan Caplinger, The Motley Fool's director of investment planning, looks at the arguments for and against waiting to take Social Security benefits. Dan notes that even though you get a reduced benefit by taking Social Security early, you get the money at a time when it might have more value to you in terms of enriching your life. Moreover, with break-even dates in your late 70s or early 80s, many people simply don't believe the actuarial figures that suggest they could live a lot longer than they expect. Dan looks at data showing that 40% of retiree-age Social Security recipients are 75 or older, with one in eight 85 or older, and notes that the data doesn't include the impact that delaying Social Security can have on younger spouses and survivors. Dan concludes that you must take health issues and other personal information into account to make the best decision, with no hard-and-fast rule applying to every single individual. Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 16427 The Motley Fool
3 Top Marijuana Stock Picks
 
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There are dozens of marijuana stocks that investors can consider buying, but not every marijuana stock is equal. It's only early-days for the marijuana industry and while the $150 billion market offers significant potential, many marijuana upstarts are likely to fail. Given bankruptcy risks and recent sky-high stock market valuations, it's gotten increasingly harder to separate the wheat from the chaff. In this clip from The Motley Fool's Industry Focus: Healthcare, analyst Shannon Jones asks guests Todd Campbell, Sean Williams, and Keith Speights: What marijuana stocks are smart buys now? Tune in to find out why Organigram (NASDAQOTH: OGRMF), Aphria Inc. (NASDAQOTH: APHQF), and Liberty Health Sciences (NASDAQOTH: LHSIF) top their list of the best buys in the industry today. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 54854 The Motley Fool
How Does Costco Make Money?
 
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Editor's note: The member figures in the video are in thousands, so the 51,600 member number cited is actually 51.6 million paid members. You might think that Costco is your average retailer… but it’s not. The “everything in bulk” store sells cleaning supplies, jeans, pet food, and anything in-between, but Costco doesn’t actually make much money on the merchandise it sells. In this video, we’re going to break down exactly where the cash really comes from for Costco. According to the company’s 2018 results, it sold $138 billion in merchandise – that’s a lot of Kirkland brand trail mix and discount prescription glasses. The products they sold cost the company $123 billion, leaving $15 billion for the business. BUT WAIT! We also have to account for all the company’s retail employees, pallet trucks, and store overhead expenses that enable Costco to sell those goods and give away those sweet, sweet free samples. All those costs combined totaled nearly $14B. So we’ve got: • Sales of $138 billion • Cost of goods sold of $123 billion • And selling, general, and administrative costs of $14 billion. That leaves us with just $1 billion dollars… but the company reported over $3 billion in net income for the year. So where’d the extra money come from? Costco’s real source of income, its memberships. In order to shop at Costco, you need to be a member, and annual membership costs either $60 or $120, depending on the benefits an individual or business chooses. Those membership fees add up over time, in the company’s 2018 results, they said they collected $3.1 billion in membership fees. A huge chunk of this revenue flows directly down to the company’s bottom line, because memberships are relatively cheap to create – all the company needs to do is give people a card, maintain a tracking system, and occasionally provide some customer service. All told, that’s a much higher-margin business than selling products to consumers, even at regular retail prices. If you look over the past few years, you’ll see Costco’s net income tracks pretty closely to the revenue it brings in from membership fees. Year Membership fees Net income 2016 $2.6 billion $2.4 billion 2017 $2.8 billion $2.7 billion 2018 $3.1 billion $3.1 billion The revenue from membership fees is what allows the company to offer customers the marked down prices and cheap private label goods they’ve come to expect. It also means that while merchandise sales matter for the company, the metrics that Wall Street tends to care about are mostly related to Costco’s member base. When the company reports earnings, investors want to see the company continue to add members, and over the past few years, it has: Year Paid members 2016 47,600 2017 49,400 2018 51,600 And the members the company brings in are generally pretty satisfied with what they’re paying for. Costco maintains a member renewal rate of around 90%. Satisfied members keep the money consistently flowing in, and it helps insulate Costco from the creeping competition of e-commerce. The membership model has helped Costco earn the “Amazon-proof” label, and kept the company’s brick and mortar business thriving even as online sales make up a larger portion of U.S. retail. Membership fees, it’s how Costco actually makes money. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 10647 The Motley Fool
How Does Netflix Work & Make Money?
 
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Have you ever been deeply involved in a pivotal part of your favorite show, only to be rudely ripped away by an annoying (and oftentimes irrelevant) commercial? If so, you weren’t watching Netflix. You see, Netflix doesn’t rely on ads to support, grow, and source its revenue. Unlike Hulu and Amazon Prime Video, the world’s leading streaming service offers every single customer a completely ad-free viewing experience. And people are into that. So without ads, how does Netflix manage to make money? In this video, we’re going to break down exactly how Netflix’s unique business model allows it to capture such a sizable audience, and how its vision for the future could cement the streaming disruptor as a bona-fide media titan. In 2018 Netflix brought in a total of $16 billion in annual revenue, up 35% year over year. The online streaming platform also grew its net income to $1.2 billion last year, double what it was in 2017. But where does that money come from? All told, roughly 139 million users pay between $8 and $16 to Netflix to stream shows, documentaries, and films every single month. In fact, in the US, Netflix’s biggest market, an estimated 54% of households now have the streaming service. That’s a lot of people binge watching in their pajamas. Last year alone, Netflix accounted for 10% of all overall screen time in United States, which adds up to 100 million hours of television per day. More eyeballs means more stream time, and for Netflix, more paying members. But it’s not just uninterrupted reruns of “The Office” and “Friends” that keep Netflix at the front of the pack. Netflix, which started as a DVD rental company, also produces its own original content: shows you just can’t find anywhere else, and just can’t put down. The company has created full-blown frenzies with its Original content – so much so that releases like “Bird Box” have become cultural events. The company estimates around 80 million member households watched the blockbuster in the first four weeks following its release. Netflix has been a steady hitmaker with its Originals, and created tentpole franchises with “House Of Cards,” “Stranger Things,” and “Ozark,” among others. These titles build buzz, bring in new members, and keep loyal fans happy, but they don’t come cheap. Instead of licensing this content, Netflix is paying the upfront cost to produce and market it. In 2018, the company spent around $12 billion on content, up from $9 billion a year ago. In 2019, the company is targeting a content spend of $15 billion. While Netflix is profitable, on a cash flow basis this content spend actually takes the company negative. In 2018, Netflix had a free cash flow of -$3 billion. And they plan to burn through an additional -$4 billion next year. You heard that right. That’s billion, with a B. The company is taking on debt to build out its content library of Originals. The plan is to eventually scale that spend down over time as the archive becomes so big that even the most avid binge-watchers can’t cruise through it all. It’s a bold strategy, but so far it’s working. As of today, Netflix is the seventh largest internet company in terms of revenue. Thanks for watching – if you have a company you’d like to see us break down, mention it in the comments section below, and be sure to like the video and subscribe to get more videos like this one from The Motley Fool. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 10994 The Motley Fool
How Do I Buy a Stock? | Investing Basics by The Motley Fool
 
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Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource is truly all you need to get started today. To claim your free copy, simply click the link above -- no credit card required! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Motley Fool analyst Austin Smith answers the crucial question to becoming an investor: How do I buy a stock? Many people are excited about our Foolish recommendations, but are still held back by one big hurdle -- knowing how to purchase shares of their favorite companies. Once you get started it's actually quite easy. Because we Motley Fools are advocates of the "do it yourself" investing strategy, Austin suggests opening an account with a discount brokerage firm. These companies charge anywhere from $7-$10 to buy and sell your positions. As a Foolish rule of thumb, don't forget to keep your trading fees below 2% on average. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 20066 The Motley Fool
How to Make Money in the Stock Market -- Growth & Value Investing
 
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Hey I'm Fool.com editor Nick Sciple, and on this episode of FAQ we're answering the question you've all been asking: How DO you make money in the stock market? People invest to make money: plain and simple. Except in special circumstances, like shorting a stock, investors buy a stock with the hopes that it will increase in value, allowing him or her to sell the shares later at a higher price and pocket the difference as profit. But how can we know that a stock is going to go up -- before we buy it? In the short term, stocks go up or down for an endless number of reasons, from military conflict and news releases all the way down to individual Tweets. However, there's only one reason a stock prices increase or decrease over the long term [which is all that matters]: to match the value of a company's assets and cash flows. As Ben Graham famously said, "In the short run, the market is a voting machine, vacillating based on the news of the day, but in the long run, it is a weighing machine, measuring the actual value of a business." Now that we know why a stock's value increases over the long term, we can answer how to make money in the stock market. There are 2 ways make money in the stock market: buy a company for less than it's worth OR buy a company at a fair value and hold it as it grows over time. Imagine I offered to trade you a $1000 car for 500 bucks. Would you take it? Most of you probably said yes -- Free 500 bucks, right? You know you can take that car, and with patience and effort, find a buyer for the car's full value. Maybe the seller didn't want to put in that effort, didn't know what the car was really worth, or for whatever reason, needed the car gone quick. and that's why she sold it to you. This same thing often happens in the stock market: a stock falls out of favor, whether due to bad news around the company, market volatility, or innumerable other reasons, and its price falls below what the company would be worth to a reasonable purchaser based on its earnings and assets. Intelligent investors can then purchase shares of the company for less than the company itself is worth, and just like with the car, sell the shares for a tidy profit once the market realizes its mistake. Also like the car, it may take a long time to find a buyer, markets can remain irrational for a long period of time. However, this strategy has been among the most successful in the history of investing. This approach, buying shares of companies for less than the resale value of the company as a whole, is known as value investing, and has been used for decades by famous investors as Warren Buffett and Benjamin Graham to build incredible wealth. Now, imagine I offered to sell you a grocery store in a small town of 100 people for fair value. This grocery store is the only one in town, everyone in town shops there for all their food, and it’s profitable. You know that in 5 years a new factory will be built in the town bringing 500 new people to the area and the total population up to 600 people. Would you take my offer? Of course you would! You know that in 5 years the grocery store will have 6 times as many customers as it has today. With a larger customer base, it should pull in even more money, making the store look extremely undervalued in 5 years! This same phenomenon often occurs in the stock market. For example, when Amazon went public in 1997, it enjoyed a market value of around $450 million. Over the ensuing 20 years as consumer preferences have shifted toward e-commerce and the company has wrangled emerging trends like cloud computing, streaming games, and advertising, Amazon's earnings have skyrocketed by 34,000% as it has enjoyed growth in those markets and the company now holds a market value of ¾ of a trillion dollars. For investors who were patient -- and confident-- enough to hold the company for the long term, through 50%+ selloffs, competitive risks, and probably some boredom, Amazon has provided life-changing returns. This investing style, buying companies with promise for future growth and holding for the long term to realize benefits from growth, is known as growth investing and has been used by investors like Phillip Fisher and The Motley Fool's Gardner Brothers to great success. Whether you invest for value or growth -- or you shoot for some of both -- successful investing requires knowledge and patience: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 8850 The Motley Fool
How Is An MLP Different from a Regular Stock? | Ask a Fool
 
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Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ In this edition of The Motley Fool's "Ask a Fool" series, Motley Fool One analyst Jason Moser takes a question from a Fool reader who asks: " I was wondering if you could tell me what exactly is a Master Limited Partnership?" Jason discusses how MLPs are structured, why they can be attractive investments for income investors and some of the risks and challenges associated with investing in MLPs. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 5868 The Motley Fool
How to Invest: 5 Effective Investing Principles
 
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One of the most common questions we get is: “How do I get started investing?” It’s understandable – the stock market is confusing (and volatile!), and the financial media makes it seem like you need a doctorate in economics to even consider investing in stocks. But the truth is, getting started investing – and investing well -- can be easy. Surprisingly easy. What you need is a simple framework – a step-by-step guide on how to invest. So, we made one. It’s packed with information – how much you need to have to invest (it’s probably less than you think), how to build the right mindset for investing, and how to find great investments. We even give you a great fund to start your investing journey. Now, maybe you want to know about how to invest in individual stocks. We don’t cover that in this video. We cover that here: Our goal is to help you get started on a long investing journey. That’s why principle #2 in the video above is: “Play the long game.” The available data shows that long-term investors dramatically outperform short-term investors in the stock market. Investing is a marathon, not a sprint, and there’s a huge opportunity for shareholders who have a long-term mindset. Let us know what you think of the video! Leave us a comment below if you have any questions or thoughts, and we’ll reach out! -------------------------------------- You can read more about The Motley Fool's disclosure policy here: https://www.fool.com/legal/fool-disclosure-policy/ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/p... Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com
Views: 5379 The Motley Fool
When is Dividend Reinvestment a Bad Idea? - Ask a Fool
 
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Dividend stocks have gotten more popular than ever as a source of income, but what if you don't need the cash that dividends provide? Reinvesting dividends often makes a huge difference to your long-term performance, but there are cases when it's the wrong move. In this installment of our Ask a Fool series, Fool contributor Dan Caplinger answers a reader's question about when you shouldn't reinvest dividends. Dan notes that reinvesting dividends can work out badly if a stock stumbles, and so you should closely evaluate each dividend-payer in your portfolio to see whether dividend reinvestment is appropriate. He also gives some guidelines for other situations when you should think twice about reinvesting your payouts.
Views: 11804 The Motley Fool
FIRE 101: The Core Rules of Financial Independence Retire Early
 
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No matter how you found your way to The Motley Fool, the odds are high that if you’re reading our articles, listening to our podcasts, or checking out some investment options, you’re at least somewhat thinking about your plan for a comfortable retirement. After all, our mission statement until recently was “Helping the World Invest -- Better," and one of the biggest things anyone invests for is their old age. But what if you don’t want to wait until you hit your 60s or 70s to fully enjoy the fruits of your labors? If that describes you, you’re not alone: A small but growing community of people in this country are coalescing under the acronym FIRE, which stands for Financial Independence/Retire Early. They’re living on less, saving much more, and preparing for -- if not full retirement -- a point where they have sufficient resources to feel fully in control of their lives. In this episode of the Motley Fool Answers podcast, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp have invited Jonathan Mendonsa and Brad Barrett, creators of the ChooseFI website and podcast. In this segment, they get down to business, and cover the basics of how they modified their lifestyles and spending to position themselves for financial independence decades ahead of the traditional timeline -- and how you can too. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 13303 The Motley Fool
What Stocks Have a Long History of Paying Dividends? | Ask A Fool
 
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This video is part of The Motley Fool's "Ask a Fool" series. Have a question about stocks, investing, a specific company, managing your money, or any other aspect of the financial world? Simply email [email protected] and we'll do our best to get it answered! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com. Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 9151 The Motley Fool
What is the minimum number of shares I can buy in a stock? - Ask a Fool
 
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Fool.com - In the video above, I answer a question that came from Melissa on Facebook: "What is the minimum number of shares I can buy?" My take? The number of shares isn't what matters; it's about the amount allocated. When investing in small increments, though, there are a few things to keep in mind, including discount brokerage minimums, trading commissions, or low- or no-fee plans like a Direct Stock Purchase Program. To submit a question of your own, find us on Facebook or Twitter via the #AskAFool hashtag.
Views: 11117 The Motley Fool
Why Do Companies Pay Dividends? And Are High Yield Dividend Stocks Actually Good?
 
05:15
The word "dividend" gets thrown around a ton, but what does it actually mean, and why do companies pay dividends? In this video, we break down the different ways companies decide to allocate capital, why companies pay dividends, and how dividend reinvesment plans (DRIP) work We also dig into some core metrics investors need to watch with dividend stocks -- dividend yield and payout ratio. Dividend yield is the annual dividend payments divided by the price for one share of the company's stock -- it gives you a sense of the return you'll earn even if the company's share price stays flat. Payout ratio is a measure of how able a company is to continue paying its dividend. It is calculated by dividing a company's annual dividend payments by its net income. Investors interested in good dividend stocks might want to start their search with the dividend aristocrats. These are stocks that have consistently raised their dividend every year for at least the past 25 years. They have been able to do that because they have strong businesses that are able to shift with trends and weather economic downturns -- and really those are some of the most important attributes of a good dividend payer. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 5147 The Motley Fool
How Does Shorting a Stock Work? And How is it Different than Buying Stock?
 
03:13
When you buy a stock, you’re hoping that the value will go up over time. If you’re shorting a stock, you’re expecting the opposite, that the value of the company will go down in the future. Buying a stock is simple, you have money in your account, you buy it, it’s yours. Shorting is a little more complicated. When you’re short, you actually borrow shares via your brokerage and immediately sell them at market price. The proceeds from the sale get deposited into your account and you have an open short position. To close the position, you have to go out and buy shares and return the same number of shares to the person you borrowed them from. Shorting is A LOT riskier than buying stocks, the main reason for that – the upside/downside is flipped. When you own a stock, the worst case scenario is that you lose all your money. When you’re short, it’s the opposite. The most you can gain is 100% of your money back, but you could lose more than you originally invested because there is no theoretical limit to the price of a stock. There are some other downsides to being short: - You have to pay to watch your thesis play out – generally there is a stock loan fee associated with shorting and it eats into your returns. - You have massive downside with big earnings surprises or M&A activity, which can lead to "short squeezes" -- if you’re shorting a stock that has a high level of short interest, people like you will look to quickly cover their positions, which can cause the impact of earnings surprises and the like even more pronounced. - You’re betting against the general motion of the market – Historically the stock market has returned 6-7% annualized. Going short is a bet against that general trend. - You’re on the hook for dividends paid out while the shares are out on loan. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 4199 The Motley Fool
What is a Stock Split? And Why Do Companies Split Their Shares?
 
04:32
What does it mean when a company decides to do a stock split? For the company and existing shareholders, it actually doesn't change that much. Stock splits change the number of ways ownership is sliced, but they don't change the value of a company or the value an individual holds. That's because when a company announces a stock split, they give existing shareholders stock as a dividend to make them whole for the increase in share count. If it doesn't change anything in terms of value, why do companies split their stock? - Stock splits reduce the price per share, making it easier for new investors to become a shareholder of the company. This is partially why Apple split its stock 7-for-1 in 2014. - Splits also increase the number of shares outstanding, which can help with liquidity. - Some special securities like options are sold in blocks of 100 shares, so if a company’s stock price is very high, it requires a lot of money upfront to create these transactions. Really, stock splits are simply cosmetic changes to how ownership of a company is held, which is why fewer companies are doing them. It's best to think of a stock split like your share of a pizza pie -- you can have one slice of a pizza that's been cut four ways, or two slices of the same pizza that's been cut eight ways. Either way, you're getting the same amount of pizza. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 3700 The Motley Fool
Should You Convert Your IRA to a Roth?
 
05:40
If you want the tax-free benefits of a Roth IRA, you can get them by converting an existing traditional IRA. Find out the details here. This podcast was recorded on Jun. 6, 2016. Imagine owning Amazon.com (up over an insane 4,000% since 2001) when Internet sales rendered big-box retailers obsolete... Now an industry 99% of us use daily is set to implode... And 3 established companies are positioned to take advantage. Click http://bit.ly/1zQXjzy for a stunning presentation. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 6198 The Motley Fool
Exploring the World of REITs | Where the Money Is - 4/25/14 | The Motley Fool
 
11:30
Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 8686 The Motley Fool
What Is the Russell 2000?
 
02:58
The Motley Fool's Brian Richards answers the question: What is the Russell 2000? And why should investors pay attention to it?
Views: 9460 The Motley Fool
Tesla Model X Redefines the SUV
 
05:11
In this video, Motley Fool senior technology analyst Daniel Sparks looks at Tesla Motors' 2015-launched Model X and discusses why the SUV is so critical to the electric-car maker's business. From its Falcon Wing doors to its massive and unique windshield, Sparks believes demand won't be a problem for Tesla's newest electric vehicle. Further, Sparks believes Tesla CEO Elon Musk was spot on when he said Model X is a better SUV than the Model S is a sedan. Motley Fool thanks Cinepro Studios for helping with some of the video footage. Imagine owning Amazon.com (up over an insane 4,000% since 2001) when Internet sales rendered big-box retailers obsolete... Now an industry 99% of us use daily is set to implode... And 3 established companies are positioned to take advantage. Click http://bit.ly/1zQXjzy for a stunning presentation. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 94784 The Motley Fool
Jack Bogle on Index Funds, Vanguard, and Investing Advice
 
51:14
Jack Bogle transformed the investment management industry. Over a career lasting nearly half a century, Bogle was a crusader for individual investors, working to bring the interests of asset managers in line with those of their investment clients. In 1975, Bogle founded the Vanguard Group, structuring the business as a mutual company, meaning that Vanguard is owned by the funds it manages and, as a result, the funds' investors. A year later, Bogle and Vanguard introduced the first ever index mutual fund available to the general public, aiming to track the performance of the broader market while charging the lowest fees possible. At first, many in the investment industry snickered at Vanguard's new index funds, but over time Bogle's idea took hold. While maintaining some of the lowest fees in the business, Vanguard has grown its assets under management from $1.8 billion at its founding to $5.3 trillion as of September 30, 2018, making Vanguard the second largest asset manager in the world. Despite Vanguard's incredible success, Bogle didn't become fantastically rich. Instead, Jack passed on as much savings as possible to Vanguard investors, bringing fees for his funds to razor-thin levels (and dragging the rest of the fund market with him). As a result, Bogle helped all investors get better returns on their retirement savings, drastically reducing underperformance caused by high management fees. As Bogle said in 2012, "My ideas are very simple. In investing, you get what you don't pay for." All investors are indebted to Jack Bogle for his efforts over 40+ years to make the investment industry better serve the interests of individuals. As we remember Bogle's life and his contributions, we hope you'll enjoy this conversation between Bogle and Motley Fool Motley Fool CEO Tom Gardner recorded in 2016. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 46729 The Motley Fool
Cannabis Stocks: Which Marijuana Companies Are Worth Watching?
 
09:45
What a difference a few years makes. Marijuana has gone from being a strictly illegal commodity virtually everywhere to one which is for all practical purposes legal in many U.S. states -- albeit with restrictions and regulations -- and totally legal as of last month in Canada. As a result, a number of public companies have sprung up to grow and wholesale the crop. But this early in newly open market, it’s still quite hazy how profitable those businesses might be, and speculation about that has led, inevitably, to seriously speculative stock price movements. In this segment of Motley Fool Answers podcast, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp ask David Kretzmann, who heads up The Motley Fool group that focuses on the cannabis business, to offer his best advice on which pot stocks he’d recommend today, whether a marijuana-focused ETF would be a solid choice, and how much of your portfolio should be devoted (at a maximum) to this space. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 18634 The Motley Fool
2 Industries to Invest in 2019, and 2 Poised to Plunge
 
04:33
Picking great stocks can be tricky, but you can do it successfully -- and helping individual investors do it is pretty much our raison d’etre at The Motley Fool. So if you’re ready to add more companies to your portfolio, we always have suggestions. As Motley Fool Money host Chris Hill previews the new year with senior analysts Aaron Bush and Matt Argersinger, he poses for them a core question: What sectors and spaces do they predict will really heat up in 2019? For Bush, it’s the software-as-a-service space -- and he has a three-stock basket to recommend. Argersinger, meanwhile, offers the perhaps counterintuitive view that with interest rates and inflation rising, real estate -- and homebuilders in particular -- are poised to deliver a rebound over the next few years. On the other hand, they suggest staying away from cannabis stocks and Facebook (NASDAQ: FB), even after their recent declines. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 6859 The Motley Fool
IBM + Red Hat: Is This Cloud Acquisition a Winner?
 
06:41
Assuming it passes muster -- and there’s no reason to expect it won’t -- IBM’s (NYSE: IBM) announced purchase of Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) for $33 billion will make it the third-largest M&A deal in the U.S. tech space ever. So even for a legacy giant, this is serious business. And at $190 a share, it’s paying a 63% premium from where the target closed Friday. So for investors, the obvious question is: What is it about this particular deal that makes it so vital for IBM? To explain what’s up, MarketFoolery host Mac Greer has analysts Emily Flippen and Jason Moser join him for this podcast to review the competitive situation in the cloud, and talk about the ways the Red Hat acquisition will enhance IBM’s offerings, and consider how this linkup could play out. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2618 The Motley Fool
The Pitfalls and Payoff of MLPs
 
04:48
The following video is part of our "Motley Fool Conversations" series, in which Motley Fool contributor and financial planner Dan Caplinger discusses topics from around the investment world. Today, Dan looks at master limited partnerships and their potential risks and rewards. With their wide exposure to the natural resources industry, MLPs have gained in popularity because of their tax benefits and high dividend yields. Dan looks at various ways to invest in MLPs, providing some specific names of MLPs with interesting opportunities, and also points out some of the complications that investors in MLPs have to face.
Views: 10583 The Motley Fool
Why Does Warren Buffett Love Bank Stocks So Much?!?!
 
06:43
Among the more humorous and memorable misquotes of the 20th century was Willie Sutton's apocryphal response to a reporter asking him why he robbed banks: “Because that's where the money is.” But while Sutton didn’t actually say that, Warren Buffett is apparently on that same page when it comes to financial institutions: When Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-A) (NYSE: BRK-B) gave the details on its holdings this week, half of the biggest holdings were banks. In this segment of the podcast, MarketFoolery host Mac Greer, along with senior analysts Andy Cross and Ron Gross, reflect on how the investing guru is doing so well with what, at first glance, might seem to be a fairly boring portfolio. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 4034 The Motley Fool
When Warren Buffett Retires, What Will Happen to Berkshire Hathaway Stock?
 
03:24
The Oracle of Omaha’s investing genius is part of what makes his company great. But it’s only part. Even people who will never buy a single share of stock know the name Warren Buffett. His celebrity as a brilliant investor transcends his niche, and his iconic status has to be recognized as supporting the stock value of his conglomerate/holding company, Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-A) (NYSE: BRK-B). But the man is 88 years old, which is why many people -- including, recently a Motley Fool Answers listener -- have been asking themselves about how much “key man risk” there is here. Will Berkshire shares slump the day Buffett announces his retirement? In this segment, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp discuss the eventual future of Berkshire with Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2548 The Motley Fool
Stocks to Buy When the Market Crashes: The Trade Desk
 
02:57
The stock market is heading lower -- indeed, all the gains the major indexes made in 2018 have evaporated. So this might not feel like an opportune moment to advocate for stock purchases. Even so, rain or shine, every 10 weeks or so, Rule Breaker Investing podcast host and Motley Fool co-founder David Gardner picks a set of five stocks to recommend, and shares them with anyone who wants to listen. Well, it’s that time again, and he has more than enough companies to choose from. To narrow his options, he set four rules for this sampler. 1. The stock had to have been a big-time winner for the RuleBreaker portfolio over the long term. 2. It had to have had hit a new high in September. 3. It had to have fallen at least 20% from that high in the weeks since. 4. The company name had to start with the letter T. For his fourth pick, he chose one that you have almost certainly been touched by, even if you don’t realize it. Digital advertising company The Trade Desk (NASDAQ: TTD) is one of the leaders in getting companies’ ads in front of just the audience they are seeking. In this segment, he talks about a couple of the key reasons he wants to put its ticker symbol in front of you. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 3114 The Motley Fool
Is Walt Disney Stock about to Have a Huge Year?
 
05:02
There’s a lot to be excited about when you look at Walt Disney’s (NYSE: DIS) 2019 box office slate. The company has seven of the ten most anticipated releases for 2019. It also has the two Star Wars lands opening this years and a huge slate of theme park additions coming. The company has also learned from some of its past mistakes in building anticipation toward those theme park changes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2850 The Motley Fool
Buying Index Funds | Ask A Fool - 4/4/14 | The Motley Fool
 
02:33
Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ In this edition of The Motley Fool's "Ask a Fool" series, Motley Fool analysts Jason Moser and Brendan Mathews take a question from a reader who asks, "I am a relatively novice investor trying to move away from managed mutual funds into more index funds/ETFs. I'm hesitating to buy index funds right now though, because the market seems to be at a peak. Does this matter when buying index funds? Will there be benefits (like dividend payments) that make it worthwhile no matter what level the market is at? Or should I wait a while and hope for cheaper prices of ETFs?" Jason and Brendan both think investing with ETFs and/or index funds are great ways to cut the costs that many actively managed funds can bear. Buying shares in something that mirrors the S&P 500 for example can give an investor plenty of diversity while offering them all the opportunity to partake in the market's overall gains. Because Fools tend to look at investing over the course of many years though, instead of trying to time the market and invest when prices are lower investors are better served by investing on a consistent basis. Buying in both the good and the bad times will help smooth out returns over the long haul while eliminating the need to try to figure out where the market is going to go in the short run. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 4421 The Motley Fool
How to Get Health Care if You Retire Early
 
04:29
Here, at The Motley Fool, our goal is to make the world smarter, happier, and richer. And at the very least, those last two are entirely in line with the goals of the FIRE movement -- the acronym stands for Financial Independence/Retire Early. It’s a fine idea in principle -- live somewhat frugally, work hard, save and invest intensively, and then retire decades ahead of the traditional timeline to enjoy the fruits of your labors. Even if its proponents don’t jump straight to full retirement, their goal is to put themselves in a financial position where they have sufficient resources to feel fully in control of their lives. But even if you can set yourself up to cover your normal expenses, your health can take unpredictable turns, and insurance and medical costs in this country are still out of control -- especially if you don’t have an employer chipping in. For this episode of the Motley Fool Answers podcast, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp have invited Jonathan Mendonsa and Brad Barrett, creators of the ChooseFI website and podcast, to explain about how the FIRE lifestyle works, and in this segment, they talk about how ultra-early retirees can cover health insurance without breaking the bank. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2143 The Motley Fool
What Is A Penny Stock? Should You Invest In Penny Stocks? - The Motley Fool Investing Basics
 
02:29
http://www.fool.com - Motley Fool Co-founder David Gardner explains "What is a penny stock?" And "should you invest in penny stocks?" Visit http://wiki.fool.com/Penny_stock for more.
Views: 16766 The Motley Fool
3 Renewable Energy Stocks Dividend Investors Should Love
 
04:30
Solar stocks have had a very ugly year, but there's one group that even the most risk-averse investors out there should take a closer look at: Yieldcos. Listen in to why the power producers have great long-term prospects, and should prove to be the safest, most reliable stocks in the renewable energy and solar industry.  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2377 The Motley Fool
Is This the Greatest Oil Field in the World?
 
02:24
In this video, Motley Fool energy analyst Joel South discusses what could become the largest oil play in the world, the Spraberry Wolfcamp shale, in Texas' Permian Basin. He tells us how fracking and horizontal drilling have only recently given drillers access to these vast reserves, and gives his picks for which companies will give investors exposure to this exciting new space. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com. Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool
Views: 9796 The Motley Fool
3 Social Security Secrets You Probably Don't Know
 
02:25
Social Security is an essential part of most people's financial planning for retirement. But many people don't know everything they should about the Social Security program. In the following video, Dan Caplinger, The Motley Fool's director of investment planning, looks at three Social Security secrets that few people know. Dan points out that only 70% of the program's 57 million beneficiaries are retired workers, with disabled workers, survivors, and dependents making up the remainder. He also notes that some state and local government workers don't participate in Social Security, instead having their own separate pension plans. Dan concludes with a reminder that divorced spouses can claim benefits under an ex-spouse's work history under certain circumstances, as long as they were married 10 years or more and meet other requirements. Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 54721 The Motley Fool
What is an Inverted Yield Curve, and Does it Predict a Recession?
 
04:51
Wall Street has gotten extremely twitchy recently for a host of real world reasons, but this week, a more obscure recession warning bell sounded: The yield curve inverted. To be clear, this is an effect, not a cause, of pessimistic investor sentiment -- but at the same time, fear breeds more fear. In this segment of the MarketFoolery podcast, host Chris Hill and senior analyst Emily Flippen describe why it's a danger sign that 5-year Treasury notes are yielding less than 3-year notes, and how investors might want to adapt their strategies in consequence. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2442 The Motley Fool
John Bogle, Founder of The Vanguard Group | A Motley Fool Special Interview
 
58:46
Jack Bogle, founder of the world’s largest mutual fund, shares his thoughts on investing. Investing made simple: The Motley Fool's essential guide to investing is now available to the public, free of cost, at http://bit.ly/1atRpHZ. This resource was designed to cover everything that new investors need to know to get started today. For your free copy, just click the link above. Visit us on the web at http://www.fool.com, home to the world's greatest investing community! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 158746 The Motley Fool
Listener Question: What Happens To The Stock When A Business Goes Bankrupt?
 
03:21
How to write off stock losses on your taxes (indefinitely!), the complications of holding on to a stock that’s mostly worthless, and more. This podcast was recorded on Mar. 10, 2016. Imagine owning Amazon.com (up over an insane 4,000% since 2001) when Internet sales rendered big-box retailers obsolete... Now an industry 99% of us use daily is set to implode... And 3 established companies are positioned to take advantage. Click http://bit.ly/1zQXjzy for a stunning presentation. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 3014 The Motley Fool
What Stocks Do Well in a Recession? And What Should Investors Stay Away From?
 
05:14
Picking great stocks can be tricky, but you can do it successfully -- and helping individual investors do it is pretty much our raison d’etre at The Motley Fool. So if you’re ready to add more companies to your portfolio, we always have suggestions. As Motley Fool Money host Chris Hill previews the new year with senior analysts Ron Gross and Jason Moser he poses them this question: What sectors and spaces do they predict will really heat up in 2019? In Gross’s view, it’s time for investors to go on the defensive, allocating more of their portfolios to utilities and discount retailers. Moser too, is looking at the slowing environment and interest rates rise, and seeing strong possible growth for smaller banks. On the other hand, the Fools will be shunning Fitbit and Zillow, respectively, and in this segment from this podcast, they’ll explain why. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 4228 The Motley Fool
How to Find the Best Growth Stocks
 
33:56
Our team has an unbelievable track record of spotting game-changing disruptors before the rest of the market caught on: Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) in 2002 (Up more than 10,000%) Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) in 2004 (Up more than 19,000%) Salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM) in 2009 (Up more than 1,900%) We've been able to deliver outstanding returns in many of our services thanks to our knack for uncovering companies with multibagger potential, and today we're going to show you how we do it! In this broadcast, we break down the key metrics -- revenue growth, earnings compounding -- we look at for identifying top stock ideas AND we talk about some of our best stock ideas for 2019 and beyond! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 23789 The Motley Fool
This Healthcare REIT Is Best-In-Class for High Yield Dividends
 
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The real estate investment trust HCP Inc. (NYSE: HCP) has been busy restructuring its portfolio to focus less on skilled nursing and more on life sciences and that could allow it to deliver dividend increases to investors. With interest rates rising, is it OK to include this dividend stock in income portfolios? In this clip from The Motley Fool's Industry Focus Healthcare, host Shannon Jones and Motley Fool contributor Todd Campbell explain how this REIT hopes to keep its funds from operations flowing. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 2780 The Motley Fool
FIRE: The Keys to Financial Independence Retire Early Lifestyle
 
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No matter how you found your way to The Motley Fool, the odds are high that if you’re reading our articles, listening to our podcasts, or checking out some investment options, you’re at least somewhat thinking about your plan for a comfortable retirement. After all, our mission statement until recently was “Helping the World Invest -- Better," and one of the biggest things anyone invests for is their old age. But what if you don’t want to wait until you hit your 60s or 70s to fully enjoy the fruits of your labors? If that describes you, you’re not alone: A small but growing community of people in this country are coalescing under the acronym FIRE, which stands for Financial Independence/Retire Early. They’re living on less, saving much more, and preparing for -- if not full retirement -- a point where they have sufficient resources to feel fully in control of their lives.  In this episode of the Motley Fool Answers podcast, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp have invited Jonathan Mendonsa and Brad Barrett, creators of the ChooseFI website and podcast, to explain how even folks with ordinary incomes can reach financial independence decades ahead of the traditional timeline.  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 43178 The Motley Fool
Financials: Analyzing Bank Stocks the Easy Way *** INDUSTRY FOCUS ***
 
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A 15-minute, 3-step guide to analyzing bank stocks. Imagine owning Amazon.com (up over an insane 4,000% since 2001) when Internet sales rendered big-box retailers obsolete... Now an industry 99% of us use daily is set to implode... And 3 established companies are positioned to take advantage. Click http://bit.ly/1zQXjzy for a stunning presentation. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 6730 The Motley Fool

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