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Georgia – A Future Bridge Between East And West | Doing Business in Georgia
 
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Georgia is an emerging destination for international property investors, but not exclusively them alone. The World Bank expects Georgia’s economic growth to be at an average rate of 5.5 per cent, per year, over the medium term, based on greater policy certainty, improved market access and strong structural reform implementation. Irakli Kilauridze, Managing Director, Colliers Georgia, and Sulkhan Khabadze, Director, British Georgian Chamber of Commerce in London discuss the business climate and investment opportunities in Georgia. According to World Bank projections, Georgia’s economic growth is expected to be at an average rate of 5.5 per cent, per year, over the medium term. This is based on greater policy certainty, improved market access and strong structural reform implementation. Georgia wants to be the link between China and Europe, which they hope will be one of the country’s growth drivers. At the moment Georgia is negotiating a free trade agreement with the Asian giant and they are already a part of the free trade area of the EU. At the beginning of March, the European Commission proposed to lift visa obligations for Georgian citizens. Foreign investors have already arrived in Georgia. According to the World Investment report, they invested 1.3 billion dollars in 2014, alone.
Poland: The Capital Of Catching Up | Growth Of Polish Economy
 
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Growth Of Polish Economy. Watch this video to find out why Poland is one of the best places to make investments. Read more here: http://www.emerging-europe.com/regional_opportunities/poland/polish_economy_invest_gdp_growth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy poland gdp poland economy polish economy economy of poland economy in poland poland economic growth economy poland poland economy facts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_rJUWX1YrY
TTIP: What Can Small And Medium Firms Expect
 
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Did you know how many small and medium businesses there are in the European Union? Almost 22 million! Out of that, over 1.5 million are located in Poland. These small and medium firms face the same trade barriers as their large peers when trying to sell to the US but they have fewer staff and less money to deal with them. TTIP, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, is bound to create new opportunities for small and medium companies. The existing tariffs of up to 30 per cent can really make a difference for SMEs between making and losing a sale. With TTIP most of the tariffs will disappear thus making European products more competitive in the US. SMEs are leaders in innovation and creativity that drive job creation and economic growth in the Transatlantic marketplace. They need strong protection of their intellectual property rights. TTIP will make sure these rights are protected and enforced, also for SMEs. TTIP will also increase transparency, reduce costs and administrative delays, improve regulations while achieving higher levels of health, safety, and environmental protection. The new procedures will be more efficient, cost-effective and compatible. For more news, reviews, insight and opinions about business in Central and Eastern Europe, go to Emerging-Europe.com
The Opportunities of Challenge — an interview with Sir Suma Chakrabarti, President of the EBRD
 
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“It’s nearly 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall and I think there’s been outstanding progress,” says Sir Suma Chakrabarti, President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), in a video interview with Emerging Europe. “You can see lots of areas of progress but we also have to recognise there’s still a huge amount of work to do and if you look at the transition process, it was undoubtedly painful in some ways, [not only] socially, economically, but also physically. Of course, there’s a huge agenda still in terms of trying to make sure that we have an inclusive transition going forward.” Sir Suma admits that not everybody has benefited equally and this remains a major economic – and also political and social – challenge that needs to be addressed urgently. “But overall, without a doubt, the positives outweigh the negatives… although there is still a huge job ahead,” he says. The President also believes that the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development has played a key role in the transition process in the region over the last 26 years. “One easy measure that people always use is the amount of investment and the number of the projects. It’s €117 billion, or more in fact now, in terms of investment, and it’s about 4,700 projects. But for me the greatest thing is to actually look at what we call transition impact, [so] I think we have been associated with a real period of success on that basis,” the President adds. In addition to finance, the bank offers policy dialogue, a variety of advisory services and engagement in institutional and legal reforms. The EBRD is now focused on continuing green and inclusive growth. “In Central and Eastern Europe, we have one of the most energy intensive regions of the world and that is very much a legacy of the Communist era. We need to reduce energy costs in the region very, very quickly and substantially. The EBRD has made a major effort on this; we’ve been working through what we call a Sustainable Energy Initiative since 2006. We have now set ourselves this target to have 40 per cent of our investments by 2020 being focused on green energy, and we are already at one third of our investments. This agenda marries our desire to be environmentally friendly and to help deal with climate change issues with, at the same time, being very business-like about it,” he says. As far as inclusion is concerned, the EBRD is focused on supporting female entrepreneurs, helping youth into work and supporting less advantaged population groups. Women’s access to finance remains a big obstacle in many countries where the bank invests and, together with donor countries and other agencies, the EBRD is working hard to overcome this issue. “We need to take it further, [so] we need to really help the undeveloped regions in all our countries of operation,” Sir Suma adds. The dynamic political and economic situation in Europe and also around the globe brings about new challenges. “One of the biggest challenges is the growth agenda. We need to grow faster,” says the President. But where there are challenges, there are always opportunities; and, for the EBRD President, they are everywhere across the regions where the bank invests and operates. “These societies are rich in skills. The education level in many of these countries is very high compared to many other emerging markets, while labour costs often are still low. We can also see huge investment opportunities. We have nearly 400 projects a year; and that shows the investment opportunities because we’re doing projects that commercial banks are still reluctant to do.” In the view of the EBRD, the largest institutional investor across emerging Europe, the future of the Old Continent lies in emerging Europe. “The Central and Eastern European success story of the last thirty years has shown that contribution – and it will continue to do so in the future. We forecast for this year that Central Eastern Europe will be growing faster than Western Europe, and that’s a sign of the potential of Central Eastern Europe. To tap that potential, I think we need to go beyond just thinking of ourselves as part of Europe. The great thing, I think, about many of these countries now, is that they have started seeing themselves in a bigger context. They are trying to tap investment from all over the world; they look at the Gulf, they look at Asia, they look at North America as well as Western Europe; and I think that’s a game changer in that region, and that will make it very successful. And if they are successful, Europe as a whole will be successful,” Sir Suma concludes. For more, go to emerging-europe.com
The Czech Republic Is On the Way To Become a Fully Developed Economy
 
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In 2015, the Czech GDP per capita amounted to over $17,000 and was the third highest in emerging Europe, after Slovenia and Estonia. Now the country has the second lowest unemployment rate in the European Union, with 4.2 per cent in July 2016, but the economy faces its own challenges. Jan Mládek, Minister of Industry and Trade, Czech Republic, spoke to Emerging Europe, about the advances the country has to make to become a fully developed economy.
High Dollarisation the Largest Challenge for Georgia’s National Bank
 
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The de-dollarisation strategy will open new opportunities to invest in the local currency, Archil Mestvirishvili, Deputy Governor of the National Bank of Georgia, tells Emerging Europe. photo: National Bank of Georgia More: emerging-europe.com
People — Emerging Europe's Greatest Asset
 
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There are about 5.5 million students in the region, about 50 per cent more than in 2000. According to UNESCO, that means there are 46 students per 1,000 inhabitants, six more on average than in the European Union. The people are much younger than in Western Europe. Compared to the EU where 82 per cent of the population is below the age of 65, that share is higher by 2 per cent and in countries like Slovakia, Belarus, Poland and Romania is between 85 and 87 per cent. An OECD report shows that almost 13 per cent of 15 year olds from Central and Eastern Europe plan a career in computing and engineering. Polish teenagers ranked at the top of the list of 55 countries with 20 per cent, compared to the OECD average of 11 per cent, 9 per cent of German and 7 per cent of UK students picking engineering and computing as their future careers. For more information about emerging Europe visit http://www.emerging-europe.com/ #studentseurope #studentsineurope #studentsinPoland #studyineurope #numberofstudentsineurope
CEE — The Outsourcing Destination | Part 5 — Emerging locations
 
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Emerging Europe Live is a series of engaging studio panel discussions about topics relevant to the region. They are recorded live and feature a selection of renowned experts, businesses and institutions. The first episode in the series is entitled CEE: The Outsourcing Destination. It features a special interview with the Minister for Economy of Bulgaria, a country that was named the Outsourcing Destination of 2015 by the UK-based National Outsourcing Association. The interview is followed by a discussion among experts and practitioners: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association; Elias van Herwaarden, EMEA Service Leader for Global Location Strategies, Deloitte; Iglika Yordanova, Managing Director for Colliers International, Bulgaria and Scott Newman, Senior Vice President and Managing Director for State Street Bank GmbH, which has two outsourcing centres in Poland with almost 3,000 employees. We discussed the following topics: • What the most recent trends are in the sector. • What companies who want to outsource to the CEE region are looking for; • Which particular CEE locations are the most attractive; which are the most promising ones/rising stars; • What the advantages of the CEE region are and how can the region differentiate itself from competing locations • Why the CEE region, as a whole, is becoming increasingly popular as far as the outsourcing sector is concerned. • Which cities/countries stand out when we look at their value propositions (human resources, office space, quality of life, etc.?) • How investors’ needs have changed over the last few years when it comes to locating their outsourcing centres?
Lviv — Ukraine's Brightest Hope For ICT And Tourism — Doing Business in Ukraine | MIPIM 2016
 
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Lviv is the largest city in Western Ukraine. It is the country’s seventh most populous city and is becoming increasingly popular among investors and tourists alike. The European football championships that were held in Poland and Ukraine in 2012 helped to popularise the city internationally and resulted in a new tourist infrastructure. Now Lviv wants to make use of that popularity and to promote a few of its key sectors; in particular tourism and IT. The latter now provides jobs for 15,000 people compared to virtually none a decade ago and it generates an estimated $300 million in annual turnover. Emerging Europe spoke to Andriy Sadovyy, Mayor of Lviv, about the city's value propositions and advantages over other destinations in the region. He also told us that the atmosphere of the city is amazing, but one really should come here, to the city, to experience this atmosphere.
CEE — The Outsourcing Destination | Part 2 — State Street Bank & growing competition in the sector
 
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Emerging Europe Live is a series of engaging studio panel discussions about topics relevant to the region. They are recorded live and feature a selection of renowned experts, businesses and institutions. The first episode in the series is entitled CEE: The Outsourcing Destination. It features a special interview with the Minister for Economy of Bulgaria, a country that was named the Outsourcing Destination of 2015 by the UK-based National Outsourcing Association. The interview is followed by a discussion among experts and practitioners: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association; Elias van Herwaarden, EMEA Service Leader for Global Location Strategies, Deloitte; Iglika Yordanova, Managing Director for Colliers International, Bulgaria and Scott Newman, Senior Vice President and Managing Director for State Street Bank GmbH, which has two outsourcing centres in Poland with almost 3,000 employees. We discussed the following topics: • What the most recent trends are in the sector. • What companies who want to outsource to the CEE region are looking for; • Which particular CEE locations are the most attractive; which are the most promising ones/rising stars; • What the advantages of the CEE region are and how can the region differentiate itself from competing locations • Why the CEE region, as a whole, is becoming increasingly popular as far as the outsourcing sector is concerned. • Which cities/countries stand out when we look at their value propositions (human resources, office space, quality of life, etc.?) • How investors’ needs have changed over the last few years when it comes to locating their outsourcing centres?
Business Opportunities in Belarus Encourage Outside Interest
 
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Increasingly, more foreign companies are identifying business opportunities in Belarus and are setting up their offices, or investing, in the country. Torsten Merkel, CEO of Pure Energy Intelligence; Selçuk Erdoğan, Managing Partner at Ketenci Law Firm, and Galymbek Mamrayev, Deputy Chairman of the Kazakhstan Public-Private Partnership Centre, discussed the energy sector, financial services and the public private partnership mechanism, as prospective areas for development in the country.
Polish Cities Of The Future: It's Time
 
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In February 2015, fDi Magazine will publish its inaugural Polish Cities of the Future ranking for 2015/16. “Polish cities have proven their attractiveness for foreign direct investment and are competitive on not just a regional but also a global scale," says Courtney Fingar, Editor-in-Chief, fDi Magazine, the Financial Times Group. “Now it is time to see how they measure up against each other and what the respective merits of Poland’s many thriving cities are,” she adds. In order to analyse the most recent FDI promotion activities of cities, we are inviting local, regional and national levels of investment promotion agencies, economic development units, governments, governors and mayors to supply additional information regarding their current investment promotion activities in order to help enhance their city’s competitiveness in the rankings. Results will be published in the February/March 2015 issue of fDi Magazine, which will have special distribution at the MIPIM international property event in Cannes in March 2015. The latest European cities and regions of the future ranking featured Wroclaw, Katowice and Poznan in the Top 10 Eastern European Cities. To find full details and the entry form, click here. For more news and opinions about the CEE region go to http://emerging-europe.com
Hungary: Rapidly Growing Economy Attracts Investors | Doing Business in Hungary
 
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With a 78 per cent of FDI per GDP ration, Hungary ranks first in the Central and Eastern European region, says Róbert Ésik, President of the Hungarian Investment Promotion Agency (HIPA), in a video interview with Emerging Europe. Currently, HIPA has a portfolio of 169 investment projects, 76 per cent more than in 2015.
The Great Stone Industrial Park — Making Doing Business Easy in Minsk | Belarus
 
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In Minsk, construction on the new Great Stone Industrial Park, which will eventually exceed ninety one square kilometres, is well underway. The Park already has 13 km of internal streets, electricity, water supply, sewerage and gas and telecommunication services. On completion at the beginning of 2017, 20,000 m2 of industrial and commercial space will be available for rent. Emerging Europe visited the Industrial Park to confirm its residents will have all the necessary services and will be able to start their activities and any necessary construction work, in the second half of 2016.
CEE Countries Expect Brexit to Result in More Opportunities for the Region
 
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It is now over two months since the EU referendum in the UK and the post-Brexit future looks more optimistic for Central and Eastern Europe. The CEE region is already preparing to accommodate foreign businesses, whichever they are, that are currently based in the UK. During the 26th Economic Forum in Krynica, Emerging Europe organised a panel discussion about the post-Brexit future of FDI in the CEE region. We invited experts from across the region and the UK to discuss the topic: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association and Director of the European Outsourcing Association, Goran Mickovski, Minister for FDI, Macedonia, Natallia Nikandrava, CEO, National Agency of Investment and Privatisation, Belarus, Katharina Arnold, Senior Manager Foreign Direct Investment, Conway Advisory, Germany, Przemysław Kamil Rosiak, Partner Associate, KPMG, Poland, and Robert Juodka, Managing Partner, Attorney at Law, PRIMUS Attorneys at Law, Lithuania.
Plzeňský Prazdroj: A Legendary Beer Producer Succeeds in Sustainable Development
 
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The story of Czech Plzeňský Prazdroj began in October 1842, when Josef Groll brewed the first batch of bottom-fermented lager. He used light barley, that was only partially malted, and none of the roasted or smoked barley that the German brewers were using whilst added generous portions of the fragrant Saaz hops to his brew. Thus he created a unique beer and a completely new category of beer (Pils, Pilsner), which has become the most popular type of beer in the world. Neither its recipe nor the brewing process has changed since it was first made. Emerging Europe spoke to Paolo Lanzarotti, CEO of Plzeňský Prazdroj, about the company’s brands, its high-quality products and its business approach which recently resulted in the 2015 Deloitte Central European Sustainability Report Award for its sustainable development report.
CEE Real Estate Varies Across the Region
 
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Despite being relatively small as a whole, the real estate sector in Central and Eastern Europe cannot be treated as a homogeneous market. Emerging Europe spoke to real estate experts from Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, and Serbia about the specifics of each national market and prospects for future growth.
TTIP: Features, Advantages And Benefits
 
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Who will win the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership negotiations and benefit from the TTIP? The European Union? The US? Consumers? Should we be afraid of the consequences? The TTIP negotiations are the most open and transparent negotiations in the European Union’s history. Yet the public seems to often have a different view. There are also misconceptions and fallacies about certain areas the TTIP covers. Apart from investment-related issues the TTIP covers other topics such as market access, trade in services, the public-private sector, financial services, audiovisual and digital services, public procurement, energy, small and medium-sized companies, regulatory issues as well as sustainable development, environment and labour. For more news, reviews, insight and opinions about business in Central and Eastern Europe, go to Emerging-Europe.com
Improving the Business Environment is Vital for Moldova’s Government
 
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After four per cent growth in 2016, we expect a growth rate of over four-and-a-half per cent in 2017, Octavian Calmac, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economy of Moldova, tells Emerging Europe. More: emerging-europe.com
Doing Business In Latvia: Linking The East And The West
 
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The European Union’s fastest GDP growth rate of over 4 per cent in 2013 and the recent adoption of the euro are not the only factors that make Latvia an attractive foreign direct investment destination. For example, Mexican CEMEX, one of the world's largest building materials suppliers and cement producers, chose Latvia almost a decade ago. "Through an analysis of the region and where the attractive markets were and also the markets where the talent pool of engineers is relevant, we decided that Latvia was a market to expand in. So in 2007, we took a decision to expand our manufacturing investing over €300 million," says Graham Russell, CEO, CEMEX Baltic Region. Today, the company has expanded to the other Baltic countries, Finland, Sweden and Russia. Alise Pīka, Deputy Head of the Investment and Development Agency of Latvia in the UK, confirms that Western companies choose Riga for their headquarters serving the CIS market and Russian companies open their offices in Latvia, thus being close to home and still operating from inside the European Union. A video produced by konceptia.com
Krakow – The Future will be Built on the Past | Doing business in Poland
 
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Krakow, Poland’s second largest city is already a European metropolis and one of the country’s major tourist destinations. Over 10 million visitors passed through the city in 2015, alone. At MIPIM Krakow presented its key development projects. Elżbieta Koterba, Deputy Mayor for City Development, Krakow, told Emerging Europe about the project the city was presenting at MIPIM Krakow is quite unique when it comes to its development. Globally, we are ranked ninth as far as business process outsourcing and research and development centres are concerned. This makes our current offers for developers exceptionally wide. We have prepared a new study, on urban planning, which includes strategic projects that will be part of the city’s future development up until 2023. One thing we have to offer is Nowa Huta of the Future. This is a multifunctional project which will include areas designated to research and development centres, technological parks and other subjects related to the knowledge-based economy. Another part of the project will have a designated focus on residential developments for people working in the area as well as sports and pastime activities. We have discovered geothermal waters and we want to encourage investors to build recreation facilities there. This project will not only be beneficial for the city of Krakow and the needs of its inhabitants but also for the entire region of Lower Poland, or Małopolska. It is an enormous project covering an area of almost 500 hectares. That means that we will need a large amount of capital and a great number of investors. Krakow was the first city in Poland to be included in UNESCO’s world heritage and we have another interesting project tied to that. We have selected an area in the city where we will allow skyscrapers to be built. We believe this project presents an outstanding opportunity for investors. Not only will these buildings not disrupt the city’s landscape, but we will be able to maintain Krakow’s heritage which is very precious to all Poles. I am talking here about the national heritage of Krakow. I must say that the skyscrapers will have an exceptional view on the city. In our opinion this is something that should encourage companies to invest in commercial and residential developments within the project. The working name of it is “the New Town.” Finally, a third project is located near Krakow’s Airport in Balice, which includes areas designated for fairs, exhibitions and hotels. Krakow is a place where tradition is linked harmoniously with modernity. It is a city with a historical heritage that has recently become a hub of outsourcing and knowledge-based economy.
Tourism is the Driver Behind Montenegro’s Development
 
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Pavle Radunović, Minister for Sustainable Development and Tourism in Montenegro, told Emerging Europe that the government plans to remove the development gap between the southern and northern parts of the country.
Poznań is Becoming an Automotive, IT and BPO Hub
 
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Jacek Jaśkowiak, Mayor of Poznań, spoke to Emerging Europe about the new real estate projects awaiting investors as well as the growth of the IT, business services and the automotive sector.
CEE — The Outsourcing Destination | Part 1 — Bojidar Loukarsky, Bulgarian Minister of Economy
 
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Emerging Europe Live is a series of engaging studio panel discussions about topics relevant to the region. They are recorded live and feature a selection of renowned experts, businesses and institutions. The first episode in the series is entitled CEE: The Outsourcing Destination. It features a special interview with the Minister for Economy of Bulgaria, a country that was named the Outsourcing Destination of 2015 by the UK-based National Outsourcing Association. The interview isfollowed by a discussion among experts and practitioners: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association; Elias van Herwaarden, EMEA Service Leader for Global Location Strategies, Deloitte; Iglika Yordanova, Managing Director for Colliers International, Bulgaria and Scott Newman, Senior Vice President and Managing Director for State Street Bank GmbH, which has two outsourcing centres in Poland with almost 3,000 employees. We discussed the following topics: • What the most recent trends are in the sector. • What companies who want to outsource to the CEE region are looking for; • Which particular CEE locations are the most attractive; which are the most promising ones/rising stars; • What the advantages of the CEE region are and how can the region differentiate itself from competing locations • Why the CEE region, as a whole, is becoming increasingly popular as far as the outsourcing sector is concerned. • Which cities/countries stand out when we look at their value propositions (human resources, office space, quality of life, etc.?) • How investors’ needs have changed over the last few years when it comes to locating their outsourcing centres?
Emerging Europe: Making Doing Business Easier | Doing Business 2015
 
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Emerging Europe economies keep improving their business environment. According to the WorldBank's Doing Business 2015 report, the number of CEE countries in the Top 50 has grown by 50 per cent since 2010. "That means these countries have introduced a number of regulatory reforms of business environment as seen by local firms," says Marina Wes, Country Manager for Poland at the World Bank. However, there are certain areas such as dealing with construction permits and tax regulations that the whole region has to improve. Some countries are working on new regulations.
Opportunities In The Electronics Sector — Doing business In Estonia
 
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The production of electronic and electrical devices has been one of the fastest growing industries in Estonia. There are now nearly 200 companies manufacturers. Between 2005 and 2013, their sales volumes increased nearly five times. The country’s achievements in areas such as e-government, ease of doing business, e-residency, high-tech education and language skills also translate into the electronics sector. European electronics manufacturers are now considering countries like Estonia as a prospective investment destination. British companies are interested in doing business in Estonia and take part in business missions that showcase the opportunities the country offers. What Estonia offers is the best business environment in the region, low risk, high quality, competitive location, labour costs accounting for a quarter of those in Germany, Sweden or the UK and a simple tax system.
CEE — The Outsourcing Destination | Part 7 — Political risk and less popular BPO destinations
 
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Emerging Europe Live is a series of engaging studio panel discussions about topics relevant to the region. They are recorded live and feature a selection of renowned experts, businesses and institutions. The first episode in the series is entitled CEE: The Outsourcing Destination. It features a special interview with the Minister for Economy of Bulgaria, a country that was named the Outsourcing Destination of 2015 by the UK-based National Outsourcing Association. The interview is followed by a discussion among experts and practitioners: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association; Elias van Herwaarden, EMEA Service Leader for Global Location Strategies, Deloitte; Iglika Yordanova, Managing Director for Colliers International, Bulgaria and Scott Newman, Senior Vice President and Managing Director for State Street Bank GmbH, which has two outsourcing centres in Poland with almost 3,000 employees. We discussed the following topics: • What the most recent trends are in the sector. • What companies who want to outsource to the CEE region are looking for; • Which particular CEE locations are the most attractive; which are the most promising ones/rising stars; • What the advantages of the CEE region are and how can the region differentiate itself from competing locations • Why the CEE region, as a whole, is becoming increasingly popular as far as the outsourcing sector is concerned. • Which cities/countries stand out when we look at their value propositions (human resources, office space, quality of life, etc.?) • How investors’ needs have changed over the last few years when it comes to locating their outsourcing centres?
Katowice — A Polish City For a Change | Doing Business in Poland
 
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The City of Katowice is interested in attracting investors who are looking to create new jobs in the more creative sectors, based on high technologies, environment-friendly as City hall is promoting our city as an ecological one, not just a city based on traditional industries, says Marcin Krupa, Mayor of Katowice, in a video interview with Emerging Europe.
Poland's Rising Outsourcing Destinations | London June 2017
 
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With a view on presenting the opportunities close to home that Poland offers, Emerging Europe, the Global Sourcing Association (GSA) and Pro Progressio are organising a seminar to explore fast-growing business process outsourcing and shared services locations in the country. Senior decision makers from the cities of Gdynia, Lublin and Poznań will be presenting their locations’ diverse value propositions while a stellar selection of experts will provide independent insight via keynotes, a panel discussion and Q&A session. The event will be held at 58VE, a brand new venue in the heart of Embankment, and will be followed by a networking drinks reception in an open terrace overlooking the Thames. This is a unique chance to meet decision makers from highly attractive outsourcing destinations in one place. To get the most out of your participation, make sure to request meetings with city representatives when registering. More: emerging-europe.com
Innovation and Consolidation — Key Trends in Polish Banking
 
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There is no discussion about innovation in the European banking sector without acknowledging the achievements of Polish banks in the area, Wojciech Sobieraj, CEO at Alior Bank, tells Emerging Europe.
Budapest — Development and Investment in a Popular Tourist City | Doing Business in Hungary
 
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It is a top priority for Budapest to make the city a preferred destination for international real estate developments and investments. Long-term urban development concepts and planned future sports events provide great momentum for introducing the city at international forums and for generating investor interest. Dr. Balázs Szeneczey, Deputy Mayor of Budapest, talks to Emerging Europe about the city's opportunities for foreign investors and about the city's candidacy to host the Olympic Games in 2024. This would be the first Olympic Games to be held in Budapest, although the city was promised they could host the event, back in 1920. In the meantime the city is preparing plots of land for foreign investors. Budapest is Europe’s tenth most visited city and 37th globally. Last year, Budapest was ranked the second fastest-developing urban economy in Europe by the Global Metromonitor 2014.
Łódź — A City With Transformation Flowing In Its Veins
 
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The City of Łódź, with nearly 706,000 people, is the third largest city in Poland. The city has its own airport, Władyslaw Reymont Airport, and it is conveniently located not far from Warsaw Chopin Airport and connected by about an hour train ride from Warsaw but it has the greatest roading infrastructure across Poland. Hanna Zdanowska, Mayor of Łódź, spoke to Emerging Europe about how the city has developed over the last six years when Łódź first took part in MIPIM, and the city's future plans and development strategy.
Military Neutrality In Ukraine Is Key To Its Economic Growth | Ukraine Economy
 
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Thousands living in eastern Ukraine are caught in the escalating conflict between government forces and Russian-backed separatists. With foreign retail companies, international trade going down and the devaluation of the hryvnia, the economic situation is worsening and the country is on the verge of bankruptcy. In London, we ask Dr. Mohammad Zahoor, a British businessman of Pakistani origin, who has been working and investing in Ukraine for the last four decades, whether Ukraine can still be attractive for foreign investors and what should the current government do to facilitate the country’s economic growth. A video produced by konceptia.com
Warsaw — A Livable And Green City Of The Future | Doing Business in Poland | MIPIM
 
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Warsaw – the capital of Poland is an amazing city, full of contrasts, question marks and surprises. This Central and Eastern European financial centre, with its immense scientific and academic centre, is a furnace of talents in many areas of knowledge, with about 370,000 students. The city’s GDP is twice as high as the EU average. Emerging Europe spoke to Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, Mayor of Warsaw, about the city's development plans and its offer addressed to property investors.
Polish Special Economic Zones Staying Strong | Doing Business In Poland
 
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Doing Business In Poland - Polish Special Economic Zones Read more here: http://www.emerging-europe.com/regional_opportunities/poland http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_economic_zone http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Fy4igBu0tk
Poznań — Investment And Good Living Along The Warta River | Doing business in Poland
 
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Poznań, one of the two largest cities in western Poland, came to MIPIM to arouse foreign investors’ interest in the city’s real estate projects. We have prepared an offer, including over a dozen of potential investment projects, both in the city centre and in its outskirts. We are concentrating on commercial projects, mainly offices and services. We also have residential projects and recreation facilities. It is important for us to make the city turn back towards the Warta River, which has been in the area for millennia and where we haven’t had any benefit from, as far as recreation and tourism are concerned, for decades. This offer is quite wide. We also have a lot of experience of renovating and revitalising old industrial and military complexes, working together with both domestic and international investors, and projects such as these are also on offer. But Poznań has more to offer to investors, says Mariusz Wiśniewski, Deputy Mayor of Poznań. Poznań, Wielkopolska is very definitely associated with high quality, with work and with entrepreneurial spirit and I am sure this is a great place to start.
SEE Link — Integrated Balkan Stock Exchanges Make CEE More Visible In Europe
 
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SEE Link, a joint project of the stock exchanges in Zagreb, Sofia and Skopje, became operational at the end of March. Emerging Europe spoke to André Küüsvek, Director, Local Currency and Capital Markets Development at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, about the initiative. SEE Link is a cross border initiative integrating regional equities markets without merger or corporate integration, using only technology that will enable participating stock exchanges to remain independent yet complement and to allow investors an easier and more efficient approach to those markets through a local broker. The three national bourses will now become more visible on the map of capital markets in Central and Eastern Europe and the initiative seems attractive for others. The network will help integrate domestic stock markets with a combined equity market capitalisation of US$ 30 billion, allowing for order routing of almost 400 stocks listed on the three exchanges.
TTIP And Polish Small And Medium Enterprises Expanding To the US
 
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Attracted by higher growth prospects and seeking new business opportunities, more and more Polish companies are looking to expand to foreign markets, including the United States. But now companies, especially small and medium, have to overcome a number of obstacles. For example, tariffs between the EU and the US might be relatively low on average but some industries — like food and textile — still suffer from high import duties of up to 30 per cent. This makes European products more expensive than American goods. TTIP, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, a free trade agreement between the EU and the US, will solve that problem. TTIP will also do away with numerous unreasonable bureaucratic procedures, protect European property rights and grant equal access to the US market for European service providers. With a population of over 300 million and one of the world’s highest household incomes, the US is a prospective market for all small and medium firms from the European Union. PL W poszukiwaniu większych zysków ze sprzedaży oraz nowych rynków zbytu, polskie firmy coraz chętniej interesują się zagranicznymi rynkami. Jednak dotychczas firmy, szczególnie małe i średnie, musiały pokonać wiele przeszkód. Choć stawki celne między Unią Europejską a Stanami Zjednoczonymi są przeciętnie dość niskie, w niektórych sektorach, takich jak żywność i tekstylia, dochodzą nawet do 30 procent. W efekcie importowane produkty europejskie są droższe od tych wyprodukowanych w USA. Transatlantyckie Partnerstwo w dziedzinie Handlu i Inwestycji, czyli porozumienie o wolnym handlu między Unią Europejską i Stanami Zjednoczonymi, pomoże rozwiązać ten problem. Usunie także liczne, niepotrzebne procedury biurokratyczne, ochroni europejskie prawa właśności intelektualnej i zapewni równy dostęp do amerykańskiego rynku dla europejskich dostawców usług. Obecnie, firmy, szczególnie małe i średnie, muszą pokonać wiele przeszkód. Chociaż stawki celne między UE i USA są generalnie dość niskie, to np. w takich sektorach jak żywność czy tekstylia dochodzą nawet do 30%.W efekcie produkty wyprodukowane w Unii są droższe od tych amerykańskich. For more news, reviews, insight and opinions about business in Central and Eastern Europe, go to Emerging-Europe.com
The Impact of U.S. Investments In Poland — Successful Together! | Investing In Poland
 
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Poland is the major destination for U.S. investments in Central and Eastern Europe with direct investments worth over €11 billion (out of 29 billion invested in the CEE region in 2012). The actual value of U.S. investments in Poland approaches PLN 91 billion or €22 billion. Companies with American capital employ approx. 200,000 people in Poland. This makes American investors one of the most important employer groups. The average pay of a person employed in an American-owned company was nearly €1,600, or 1.7 times more than the average pay in Poland’s. The majority of companies with American capital first entered Poland in the early 1990s and made reinvestments in the last decade. According to KPMG estimates, more than two thirds of American companies made reinvestments in Poland, e.g. opened another branch, a manufacturing plant, or a business or R&D centre. As far as bilateral trade is concerned, the USA is the most important non-European market for Polish goods: in 2013, Poland exported €3.6 billion worth of goods to the USA. The United States is also the second largest (after China) non-European supplier of goods to Poland: in 2013, American exports to Poland totalled €4.4 billion. Despite a considerable geographic distance between Poland and the USA, the latter is also an important partner in the exchange of services. In 2012, the USA was the third largest supplier of services to Poland and the fifth largest buyer of services. The Impact of U.S. investments in Poland - Successful Together! [ Investing in Poland ] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States invest in Poland investment in Poland investing in Poland
Ostrava — Guided By Tradition But Looking Towards the Future | Doing Business In the Czech Republic
 
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The Czech city of Ostrava is replacing its traditional sectors, such as coal mining and the steel industry, with ICT, nanotechnology and outsourcing services. A few years ago these sectors were only distant goals for the city, but now over 7,000 people are employed in the ICT sector alone. In recent years Ostrava has experienced an enormous economic boom, and is seeing the construction of new hotels and an inflow of investment to its industrial zones. Emerging Europe spoke to Tomáš Macura, Mayor of Ostrava, about the city's advantages and value proposition for foreign investors.
CEE — The Outsourcing Destination | Part 8 — The experts’ advice for location promoters
 
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Emerging Europe Live is a series of engaging studio panel discussions about topics relevant to the region. They are recorded live and feature a selection of renowned experts, businesses and institutions. The first episode in the series is entitled CEE: The Outsourcing Destination. It features a special interview with the Minister for Economy of Bulgaria, a country that was named the Outsourcing Destination of 2015 by the UK-based National Outsourcing Association. The interview is followed by a discussion among experts and practitioners: Kerry Hallard, CEO of the National Outsourcing Association; Elias van Herwaarden, EMEA Service Leader for Global Location Strategies, Deloitte; Iglika Yordanova, Managing Director for Colliers International, Bulgaria and Scott Newman, Senior Vice President and Managing Director for State Street Bank GmbH, which has two outsourcing centres in Poland with almost 3,000 employees. We discussed the following topics: • What the most recent trends are in the sector. • What companies who want to outsource to the CEE region are looking for; • Which particular CEE locations are the most attractive; which are the most promising ones/rising stars; • What the advantages of the CEE region are and how can the region differentiate itself from competing locations • Why the CEE region, as a whole, is becoming increasingly popular as far as the outsourcing sector is concerned. • Which cities/countries stand out when we look at their value propositions (human resources, office space, quality of life, etc.?) • How investors’ needs have changed over the last few years when it comes to locating their outsourcing centres?
Lithuania: A Recognised And Popular Centre of Outsourcing
 
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Lithuania's wealth is in our people's brains, says Asta Skaisgirytė-Liauškienė, Lithuanian Ambassador to the United Kingdom.